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With winter approaching and this being my first Diesel engine, what do I put in the gas, Stabil, anti gelling liquid, anti- fungus or all three or two of them or ........?????
 

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With winter approaching and this being my first Diesel engine, what do I put in the gas, Stabil, anti gelling liquid, anti- fungus or all three or two of them or ........?????
That is a loaded question as everyone has their favorite additive. I use Deere's Fuel Protect product Winter Formula. The 16oz bottle is only $6.63.

Part
number
Size and pkg. qty.Treat rate
TY2678716 oz. (473 ml) per bottleEach bottle treats 52 gallons (197 L) of diesel fuel
TY267881 gallon (3.78 L) per bottleEach bottle treats 416 gallons (1575 L) of diesel fuel
TY267895 gallon (18.9 L) per pailEach pail treats 2080 gallons (7874 L) of diesel fuel

TY26787-2.jpg
 

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For sure a loaded question. I use nothing at all in the 3520. The tractor is ran year around and the majority of its fuel comes from service stations. Maybe I'm putting to much trust in their fuel but never a problem so far. The only time I use additives is when I have something that will be sitting most of the winter and it's sitting with a tank of fuel I purchased during the summer. We typically don't have the temps that folks further north sees so I'm sure that plays a large role in not having issues from my lack of additives in fuel.
 

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I can't speak with certainty about the anti-gelling products in your area, however, if you are getting your diesel from a reputable station, I doubt it is needed. As far as the other items, fuel doesn't sit around long enough for me to need any of those. I run my tractor during the winter months too, just not as often, or as hard. I do not put any additives in my fuel tank, nor in the diesel can sitting in my shed. I do however, keep all of them full. Keeping them full prevents condensation, in my sometimes humid climate.

If you are "putting your tractor to bed" for the winter, then I'd top off the fuel tank. And keep an extra full can of fuel on hand. If you intend to run it during the winter, I'd still top off the fuel tank, and top it at the end of each use.

One thing I do, getting ready for a season change, is an oil change. I like to do them Spring and late Fall here, so I know it is ready to go when needed. That way, oil is clean of carbon and able to flow freely. (Well, as freely as it can in your area during really cold spells.) I do other oil changes as I get hours on mine, but even if I only put 10-15 hours on it in the summer, I do an oil change for winter. Same going into Spring.

Maybe others from a much more northern climate can tell what they do. Also, we have some members that are, and have been OTR truck drivers, across the country, and can tell you if they've ever had a problem in their big rigs running diesel, up north. No one I've ever talked to has mentioned it, but then, I'm not sure that I've ever asked.
 

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I can certainly understand you folks who live farther south not worrying about winter fuel conditioning. I'm in PA and we routinely see single digits during the winter months. The OP is showing Northern Wisconsin for a location so I would certainly recommend adding "something" to minimize worries about fuel during the winter.

I would also recommend keeping a spare fuel filter on-hand just in case things still gel up on you.
 

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I can certainly understand you folks who live farther south not worrying about winter fuel conditioning. I'm in PA and we routinely see single digits during the winter months. The OP is showing Northern Wisconsin for a location so I would certainly recommend adding "something" to minimize worries about fuel during the winter.

I would also recommend keeping a spare fuel filter on-hand just in case things still gel up on you.
I think I qualified my reply with my location. However, do your reputable stations up north not add anti gelling to their fuel, before it goes into the tank or can? Even in my part of Texas, some is added.

Great suggestion about the extra filter! What product(s) do you recommend the OP use? :dunno:
 

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I use Power Service Diesel fuel antigel/cetane boost. Works will enough here in Indiana.
 

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I think I qualified my reply with my location. However, do your reputable stations up north not add anti gelling to their fuel, before it goes into the tank or can? Even in my part of Texas, some is added.

Great suggestion about the extra filter! What product(s) do you recommend the OP use? :dunno:
I guess the key would be to find a reputable station. :) Over the years I have called several and asked about whether they add anything to the fuel in the winter and if so WHEN do they start adding it. All I ever got was a "Dunno".

I figure at only 1.5oz per 5-gallons for the JD stuff I just dump 'er in there and fa-get-about-it. :)
 

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As a fellow northern Wisconsinite I'd recommend using something in your fuel. Everyone seems to have their favorites... Everyone seems to have reasons why their particular additive is the "best" and nothing else is any good... It can evolve into a "which oil is best" kind of thing...

I've had good luck buying my fuel 10 gallons at a time from the local service station. I buy their "off road use", "non road taxed", red dyed fuel. I don't know if the station sells a winter blend of #1 and #2 or what, so I add 2 ounces / 5 gallons when the temps are cooling off, 40º and cooler, in the fall.... and when it's cold, closer to 0º, I add 4 ounces / 5 gallons

7080387_pws_102512_pri_larg.jpg


Many, many years ago, I worked for a construction company and they would let the cold weather catch them by surprise every year.. :banghead:

It's no fun changing fuel filters outside, in the wind, on a below zero day... A little something in the fuel to prevent gelling would be a good thing.

And just an FYI... Power Service makes several diesel fuel related products and some of the bottles kind of look the same. There's a product to clear the gelling in an emergency, one to keep algae under control...

Good luck!
 

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diesel additives in CT

I bought my 4052 r last february and ran it often all winter....we had a lot of snow....and it started perfectly without hesitation right from the start.
Once I started needing fuel I asked my fuel supplier (gas station that sells diesel) if they condition the fuel....his statement is that he did not think so. So I have fuel in CT cold weather with uncertain additives. I use one of the antigel additives and when the forecast is for below zero I add a couple of gallons of k1 kerosene. I have had two diesel trucks which got me stuck more often than I would like and that was due to poor information and NO ONE actually KNOWS what is being supplied. So, It is not harmful to use the available diesel additives and since I have become more proactive in this regard have had no starting or running problems at all. I suspect the Yanmar engine is a good part of the equation here though a waxed up fuel filter will kill any diesel pretty fast.
I have gleaned what I can from heavy equipment operators who have had experience in this area and so far it has been helpful. Conditioned fuel will assure you of a clean fast start up every time in all weather. The key I think here is how long will the temp be below 32 degrees....then plan on this and be prepared. Conditioning AFTER the freeze is not a lot of help though you just might squeek by....and we all get too busy to be a jump ahead of the weather all the time.

I just changed the oil and will have the tractor cleaned up and greased before snow fall. Then it is a matter of being near an electrical outlet to plug in my block heater if I plan on working out in the cold.
The longer you own the tractor,,,the more you will understand how to keep it running.
Dockw in southwest CT
 

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As a fellow northern Wisconsinite I'd recommend using something in your fuel. Everyone seems to have their favorites... Everyone seems to have reasons why their particular additive is the "best" and nothing else is any good... It can evolve into a "which oil is best" kind of thing...

I've had good luck buying my fuel 10 gallons at a time from the local service station. I buy their "off road use", "non road taxed", red dyed fuel. I don't know if the station sells a winter blend of #1 and #2 or what, so I add 2 ounces / 5 gallons when the temps are cooling off, 40º and cooler, in the fall.... and when it's cold, closer to 0º, I add 4 ounces / 5 gallons

View attachment 484970


Many, many years ago, I worked for a construction company and they would let the cold weather catch them by surprise every year.. :banghead:

It's no fun changing fuel filters outside, in the wind, on a below zero day... A little something in the fuel to prevent gelling would be a good thing.

And just an FYI... Power Service makes several diesel fuel related products and some of the bottles kind of look the same. There's a product to clear the gelling in an emergency, one to keep algae under control...

Good luck!
Second that! Same as I use
 

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We use CenPeCo additive, more than twice the cost of power service but I can assure you none of my FIL’s tractors have ever seen a drop of kerosene which is what most stations use to drop the cold filter plug point. Power service is actually one of lesser quality additives, but they cornered the market many years ago in the trucking industry so they are the name of the game in diesel additives.


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Diesel fuel treatments are like oil brand choices. Everyone has one they like and probably one they don't like. Personally, I use a diesel fuel additive year around as a good diesel fuel additive will enhance the lubrication of injector pump components. I personally would NEVER trust a station to have added a diesel fuel conditioner because the down side is too great had the fuel not been correctly treated for some reason. Also, there is virtually no risk of "over treating" fuel unless you completely ignore the manufacturers dilution ratio's, etc.

I like this brand of Diesel Fuel conditioner.

Howes Lubricator

One thing you want to avoid is having to use products which "Rescue You" from having already experienced a Gel problem or other fuel moisture related issue. Many of those products, such as the 9/11 Rescue Products have a lot of alcohol in them to disperse moisture and deal with the moisture related issues which can impact diesel fuel. Alcohol is very corrosive and using a product which is heavily loaded with alcohol to solve a problem once you have it means you are also unnecessarily putting stress on the fuel system components like the injector pump bearings and seals.

In my opinion, a product I want to avoid ever having to use....



Personally, I have always viewed the small cost of treating the diesel fuel as a wise investment to avoid the hassle, frustration, down time and possible damage to equipment which can occur as a result of diesel fuel issues. But I know some people who refuse to treat the fuel and insist that however they get their fuel from the pump is how they are going to burn it. That is one part of what makes America a great place, we can do whatever suits us.

I think the fact that the OP is asking the question is a good start. Also, most Lucas Products are well made. Sea Foam is also a very proven product and one which I also use in gas engines, transmissions, etc. I suggest picking one brand and sticking with it for consistency and so you are used to always treating your fuel.

I don't know anyone who ever regretted treating their diesel fuel but I have seen many who regretted not treating their fuel and avoiding a fuel issue. If you are going to have a problem, it's going to be when the weather is it's worst, the equipment is needed the most and that's when a problem will occur. The five seconds it takes to add the treatment to my 6 gallon fuel jugs is something I always do when I grab the empty jugs to take them to fill them. You don't have to be real exact with the measurement, too much isn't harmful where too little could be. You don't need to go nuts with adding it, just follow the directions for the product you are using and you should be fine. :good2:
 

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Diesel fuel treatments are like oil brand choices. Everyone has one they like and probably one they don't like. Personally, I use a diesel fuel additive year around as a good diesel fuel additive will enhance the lubrication of injector pump components. I personally would NEVER trust a station to have added a diesel fuel conditioner because the down side is too great had the fuel not been correctly treated for some reason. Also, there is virtually no risk of "over treating" fuel unless you completely ignore the manufacturers dilution ratio's, etc.

I like this brand of Diesel Fuel conditioner.

Howes Lubricator

One thing you want to avoid is having to use products which "Rescue You" from having already experienced a Gel problem or other fuel moisture related issue. Many of those products, such as the 9/11 Rescue Products have a lot of alcohol in them to disperse moisture and deal with the moisture related issues which can impact diesel fuel. Alcohol is very corrosive and using a product which is heavily loaded with alcohol to solve a problem once you have it means you are also unnecessarily putting stress on the fuel system components like the injector pump bearings and seals.

In my opinion, a product I want to avoid ever having to use....



Personally, I have always viewed the small cost of treating the diesel fuel as a wise investment to avoid the hassle, frustration, down time and possible damage to equipment which can occur as a result of diesel fuel issues. But I know some people who refuse to treat the fuel and insist that however they get their fuel from the pump is how they are going to burn it. That is one part of what makes America a great place, we can do whatever suits us.

I think the fact that the OP is asking the question is a good start. Also, most Lucas Products are well made. Sea Foam is also a very proven product and one which I also use in gas engines, transmissions, etc. I suggest picking one brand and sticking with it for consistency and so you are used to always treating your fuel.

I don't know anyone who ever regretted treating their diesel fuel but I have seen many who regretted not treating their fuel and avoiding a fuel issue. If you are going to have a problem, it's going to be when the weather is it's worst, the equipment is needed the most and that's when a problem will occur. The five seconds it takes to add the treatment to my 6 gallon fuel jugs is something I always do when I grab the empty jugs to take them to fill them. You don't have to be real exact with the measurement, too much isn't harmful where too little could be. You don't need to go nuts with adding it, just follow the directions for the product you are using and you should be fine. :good2:
Well said Sulley, our fuel is treated with every fill up, year around like yours always has been, always will be.


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Well said Sulley, our fuel is treated with every fill up, year around like yours always has been, always will be.


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Same here. I buy my fuel in the summer so I know for sure it is summer fuel. I treat the tank at delivery.

I’ve posted this before - maybe you can verify since you are in the business. At fuel station you are buying summer fuel in the summer. Sometime in the fall (I have never been able to verify when either) they start getting loads of winterized fuel. So let’s say they have a 10k gal tank and get a delivery of 5k gallons. So now, until their next delivery, the fuel is only 1/2 treated.

First off - again - who knows when thier thanks will be 100% winterized fuel. Secondly, a lot of folks here use 5 gallon jugs which may last them a couple months between mowing and plowing seasons. So you fill your jug in November thinking you have treated fuel - but do you?

Fuel treatment is not only for anti-gel. It also has properties to help disperse water (I won’t get into the emulsifier vs. demulsifier here - that would end up worse than an oil thread...) plus extra lubricants for the fuel system. So why not spend a few cents per tank full to use treatment year around? Diesel delivery systems in our engines work at very high pressures with very close tollerances. Dirt and water are its worst enemy.
 

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I guess the key would be to find a reputable station. :) Over the years I have called several and asked about whether they add anything to the fuel in the winter and if so WHEN do they start adding it. All I ever got was a "Dunno".

I figure at only 1.5oz per 5-gallons for the JD stuff I just dump 'er in there and fa-get-about-it. :)
Of what?
 

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It varies regionally of course but up here usually this is the time of the year they start “blending”, but they also start out in steps, starting with 10% then 20% until they reach a 30/70. Depending on the turn over of a particular station they could easily be well into very cold before they have a sufficient blend. Three of our four stations don’t have high turnover so right now I’m in the process of almost running them out so I can get the blend where it needs to be.


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Same here. I buy my fuel in the summer so I know for sure it is summer fuel. I treat the tank at delivery.

I’ve posted this before - maybe you can verify since you are in the business. At fuel station you are buying summer fuel in the summer. Sometime in the fall (I have never been able to verify when either) they start getting loads of winterized fuel. So let’s say they have a 10k gal tank and get a delivery of 5k gallons. So now, until their next delivery, the fuel is only 1/2 treated.

First off - again - who knows when thier thanks will be 100% winterized fuel. Secondly, a lot of folks here use 5 gallon jugs which may last them a couple months between mowing and plowing seasons. So you fill your jug in November thinking you have treated fuel - but do you?

Fuel treatment is not only for anti-gel. It also has properties to help disperse water (I won’t get into the emulsifier vs. demulsifier here - that would end up worse than an oil thread...) plus extra lubricants for the fuel system. So why not spend a few cents per tank full to use treatment year around? Diesel delivery systems in our engines work at very high pressures with very close tollerances. Dirt and water are its worst enemy.
I was hoping that you would be one to offer advice, with your experience. Thanks for all of this.
 

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.... (I won’t get into the emulsifier vs. demulsifier here - that would end up worse than an oil thread...) plus extra lubricants for the fuel system. So why not spend a few cents per tank full to use treatment year around? Diesel delivery systems in our engines work at very high pressures with very close tollerances. Dirt and water are its worst enemy.
Stan,

No big deal with the emulsifier/demulsifier additive question.

If the equipment has a water separator, use a demulsifier to turn the water into big droplets in the fuel so it collects in the separator bowl.

If the equipment does NOT have a water separator, use an emulsifier to break up the water droplets so small they pass through the system.
 

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Stanadyne performance formula is what I have run in all my diesels for years with great results. I run it in every single tank, doesn’t cost that much and has year round benefits of upper cylinder lubrication, cetane boost, anti algae, anti gel, helps remove water, etc.

Jason


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