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Ready for another Saturday night silly question?

What is the difference between a ferrous and non-ferrous circular saw metal cutting blade? I know the difference between the two metals. I have a small Makita 5-3/8" cordless metal cutting circular saw. I have 30-tooth and 50-tooth blades but they both say they are for ferrous metals. Looking on-line I see that most blades are advertised as being for ferrous but a few are in fact labelled as non-ferrous. Both style blades come in 30T and 50T and are carbide tipped. So what makes one 30T or 50T carbide blade suitable for non-ferrous and another one not?

I have to make a 6-inch cut through 1/4-inch thick 6061 Aluminum Tooling Flat Sheet Plate Bar Mill Stock and I'm trying to decide if I can use either of the blades I currently have.
 
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I suspect the aluminum one has a sharper edge. The sharper edge will cut the aluminum better instead of melt it and clog up. The sharper edge would break quicker in steel.

You can try yours and if you lubricate it liberally, feed lightly and make a few cuts before the bar can start melting you might be ok. Did I say lubricate liberally. I mean like Bernie Sanders would if he loved oil.
 

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I suspect the aluminum one has a sharper edge. The sharper edge will cut the aluminum better instead of melt it and clog up. The sharper edge would break quicker in steel.

You can try yours and if you lubricate it liberally, feed lightly and make a few cuts before the bar can start melting you might be ok. Did I say lubricate liberally. I mean like Bernie Sanders would if he loved oil.
Heh heh... any preference on the type of lube? What would Bernie like?

Something like Fluid Film or more like a traditional cutting / tapping fluid?
 
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I would probably use a spray with a straw that you could get down into the slot. Well sorry I just noticed it’s a 1/4”. Good part is that won’t hold the heat as bad. A little thicker might be better but the main thing is slippery. It will melt to the teeth quicker than you think. The good part is if you stop in time you can usually knock it off with a screwdriver. If you wait too long then the base metal of the blade gets hot.

If you have a partner in crime just have them spray while you cut and it should work good
 

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I would probably use a spray with a straw that you could get down into the slot. Well sorry I just noticed it’s a 1/4”. Good part is that won’t hold the heat as bad. A little thicker might be better but the main thing is slippery. It will melt to the teeth quicker than you think. The good part is if you stop in time you can usually knock it off with a screwdriver. If you wait too long then the base metal of the blade gets hot.

If you have a partner in crime just have them spray while you cut and it should work good
Sounds good. I will give that a try. I think I will use the 30T blade as the 50T says it is specifically for thin material.
 
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Sounds good. I will give that a try. I think I will use the 30T blade as the 50T says it is specifically for thin material.
Good idea. Sorry neighbor just called and I had to correct a bat in the house situation. What I am imagining is something like a small circular saw. If so spray with a straw from the underneath side while cutting so the teeth are oily each time they connect and the cooling effect of the aerosol will help as well. You might get it in one pass then. As long as chips are flying keep cutting. You will feel the resistance change instantly when it starts to clog.
 

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Herm is right, my family owns a metal shop. Generally all metal blades cut everything but aluminum well. Aluminum will fairly easily clog blades that aren’t designed for it. We would run less teeth on the saws we set up for aluminum. Most of our saws had multiple speeds and we would run as slow as possible for aluminum. They were liquid cooled saws (blades not motors). Dispute buying the liquid many times I have no clue what it actually was. Local shop sold it to us in unmarked 5 gallon buckets. It really felt like 75% water with some light oil mixed in.


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2017 2038r 72” MMM Command Cut 220r loader
 

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Good idea. Sorry neighbor just called and I had to correct a bat in the house situation. What I am imagining is something like a small circular saw. If so spray with a straw from the underneath side while cutting so the teeth are oily each time they connect and the cooling effect of the aerosol will help as well. You might get it in one pass then. As long as chips are flying keep cutting. You will feel the resistance change instantly when it starts to clog.
Correct. It is a Makita BCS550
 

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What I am imagining is something like a small circular saw.
Now I am imagining a very nice saw. I have one for wood that I probably bought when I bought the house in 90. Used it today and still works like new.
 
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I've always used a carbide tipped saw blade run backwards to cut aluminum.
Its noisy but it leaves a clean cut and is easy to handle.
 

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I've always used a carbide tipped saw blade run backwards to cut aluminum.
Its noisy but it leaves a clean cut and is easy to handle.
I have heard this before from someone a long time ago, I think it was on siding. Forgot all about that. Have you every tried that on something 1/4”? It just doesn’t seem possible for that.:dunno:
 

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I have heard this before from someone a long time ago, I think it was on siding. Forgot all about that. Have you every tried that on something 1/4”? It just doesn’t seem possible for that.:dunno:
Agree. I can see it working on thin aluminum but on 1/4 inch plate it seems like it would do more hammering than cutting.
 

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I’ve cut a lot of aluminum even on the table saw without lube. I don’t recall the grade but it was soft. Take it slow so it doesn’t over heat. Make sure the blade is for non ferrous metals, which is most alternate bevel or triple chip blades. It’s the teeth that throw out the chips and if chips are flying, as was already said, it is cutting and cool.

Personally, I would never run a carbide blade in reverse, the teeth are welded up against the haunch of the blade body and if you run it backwards you risk tearing the teeth off. There is a blade for every application without having to run it backwards.
 
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Back a few years ago when I worked on a high speed ferry we used to just the patch out of the hull to remove the engine with a circular saw.

The hull was 1/4" or better high strength aluminum. They would have the 10' x 20' hole cut in a very short time. The saw curf set the patch up for when it got welded back in.
 

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Well... the job is complete. I ended up using my 30T ferrous carbide blade and didn't need any lubrication. I went very slow and there was no heating of the material whatsoever and no aluminum material sticking to my blade teeth.
 

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Looking at the Milwaukee blade page,,
non-ferrous blades are ground at an angle, 3, 5, or 10 degrees

The ferrous blades all have zero degree blade angle grinds,,

Circular Saw Metal Cutting Blades
 

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Ferrous - non-ferrous

Ferrous means for iron or steel material.

Non-Ferrous is for all other types of material.
 
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Ferrous means for iron or steel material.

Non-Ferrous is for all other types of material.
Or the easier way to test... ferrous = magnetic, non-ferrous = non-magnetic
 

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Except for some types of stainless steel... :tongue:
I always thought it was just cheap stainless that was magnetic? If a magnet stick to SS chances are it will rust.
 
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