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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a new 1025 and want to install an Artillian diverter on it. I have Power Beyond so didn't want to go the third function route for reasons.

I asked my salesman earlier this week if doing the install myself would pose any warranty issues and he said he'd look into it, but hasn't gotten back to me yet. Has anybody else here looked into this and gotten a definitive answer?

I've watched TTWT's video and this seems like a straightforward job and would save me the hassle of having to schedule the dealer to pick the machine up and all that. In hindsight I should have just ordered it with the tractor but it was going to take an extra couple weeks due to backlogs and I had green fever.
 

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No, it shouldn’t cause any warranty issues. There are no permanent modifications made to the tractor or loader.
 

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When you add purpose built after market items which work in conjunction with the OEM systems, there should be NO warranty issues. Frankly, it doesn't matter if you add the item or have the Service Techs add the item. You aren't changing the hydraulic pressure or basic operation of the system, you are just expanding the system, so you should be fine.

There is an extensive amount of information about this within the SEMA* organization website. This is important and relevant because there have been legal cases by SEMA and it's member companies who make and provide products which are added to vehicles where manufacturers attempted to deny warranty coverage because of the use of after market products and both the courts and the Federal Government denied the manufacturers attempt to deny warranty coverage because of the use of after market products.

Now, if you were changing the hydraulic pump output or modifying the systems pressure with the addition of non OEM components, that's potentially a very different situation. Per Deere's own warranty statement, they don't want you to

""(2) Any Equipment that has been altered or modified in ways not approved by John Deere, including, but not limited to, setting injection pump fuel delivery above John Deere specifications; ""

Read here....


Also read this.....


*SEMA is the Specialty Equipment Market Association

 
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Sansbury: I would appear that since you have the power beyond it would be cheaper to just get the multioutput port as TTWT show and just run you line forward maybe add a coupling at center of tractor, then all you would have to do is add a trigger switch on your joystick for that one pair. Sure would be cheaper than two systems and I'll bet you want some rear hydraulics anyway.
 

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I have a new 1025 and want to install an Artillian diverter on it. I have Power Beyond so didn't want to go the third function route for reasons.

I asked my salesman earlier this week if doing the install myself would pose any warranty issues and he said he'd look into it, but hasn't gotten back to me yet. Has anybody else here looked into this and gotten a definitive answer?

I've watched TTWT's video and this seems like a straightforward job and would save me the hassle of having to schedule the dealer to pick the machine up and all that. In hindsight I should have just ordered it with the tractor but it was going to take an extra couple weeks due to backlogs and I had green fever.
The Artillian Diverter is easy enough to install. I suspect you will enjoy it!

Tim
 

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From a strict black and white standpoint, the warranty statement could be interpreted as saying 'any' non-approved modification results in no warranty. In reality, the only caveat is any damage resulting from said modification.

(II) WHAT IS NOT WARRANTED – Pursuant to the terms of these warranties, JOHN DEERE IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE FOLLOWING: (1) Used Equipment; (2) Any Equipment that has been altered or modified in ways not approved by John Deere, including, but not limited to, setting injection pump fuel delivery above John Deere specifications, modifying combine grain tanks, and modifying self-propelled sprayers with unapproved wheels, tracks, tanks or booms; (3) Depreciation or damage caused by normal wear, lack of reasonable and proper maintenance, failure to follow operating instructions/recommendations; misuse, lack of proper protection during storage, vandalism, the elements or collision or accident; (4) Normal maintenance parts and/or service, including but not limited to, oil, filters, coolants and conditioners, cutting parts, belts, brake and clutch linings; (5) Any Utility Vehicle used for racing or other competitive purpose; (6) Chains on Premium Balers.
 

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I would say adding a non John Deere hydraulic item assembly on your tractor, you may own hydraulic problems as a result.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would say adding a non John Deere hydraulic item assembly on your tractor, you may own hydraulic problems as a result.
The dealer (United Ag) told me that if they did the install it would not affect the warranty, but he didn't know what would happen if it was done by me.
 

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The only way it would affect the warranty is if the work you did could be proven to have caused the warranty issue. If you did a real crappy job and contaminated the hydraulic system with debris, then that needed to be fixed - then yeah, that could be denied. But other problems that develop on the machine that are not related to the work you did are not affected in the slightest.
 

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I'd make sure any relays or coils are "diode suppressed" to keep any electrical spikes from causing you issues.
easy enough to check, easy to fix if they aren't...
 

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When you file a warranty claim with Deere, they have a regional representative that comes by and reviews with the dealer....depending on the terms the dealer has with the customer has a lot to do with the outcome...most of the fine print in the warranty gets defined by the seller and company...now having said this I think Deere will be as fair or maybe fairer than other companies. I've talked to tractors salesman and they advised that some dealerships "not especially Deere" has thousands of dollars with warranty claims pending with companies.
 

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When you file a warranty claim with Deere, they have a regional representative that comes by and reviews with the dealer....depending on the terms the dealer has with the customer has a lot to do with the outcome...most of the fine print in the warranty gets defined by the seller and company...now having said this I think Deere will be as fair or maybe fairer than other companies. I've talked to tractors salesman and they advised that some dealerships "not especially Deere" has thousands of dollars with warranty claims pending with companies.
You must mean something different than an average warranty claim? The decision for my claims were made by the Service manager in the case of the SCV issue. If anyone else was involved it was done after I already had the part fixed. Or do you mean the rep comes by once a month an OK's all the claims? After the fact.

A mower belt out of warranty covered. (They gave me the part kept the cut belt)
SCV valve
Broken alternator bracket. (They gave me the part and asked me to bring the bad part in)
 

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Dealer's can do customer relations with parts and service but I'm referring to the actual warranty. Dealers maintain good relations to the company people "politics" so they get as good an outcome as possible. That's why when you buy out of the marketing area, you can get the cold shoulder. Ever heard of that?
 

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When you file a warranty claim with Deere, they have a regional representative that comes by and reviews with the dealer....depending on the terms the dealer has with the customer has a lot to do with the outcome...most of the fine print in the warranty gets defined by the seller and company...now having said this I think Deere will be as fair or maybe fairer than other companies. I've talked to tractors salesman and they advised that some dealerships "not especially Deere" has thousands of dollars with warranty claims pending with companies.
I literally used to be that 'regional representative' and that's not quite how Deere warranty works.

Warranty is defined by a document called the WAM (warranty administration manual) which is used by both the Dealers and Deere to determine if a failure is warrantable. The dealer will use the WAM if there are any initial questions and can contact their Territory Customer Support Manager if there are still grey areas. The dealer then submits the warranty claim to Deere and Deere will approve it if all the correct steps have been taken, i.e. properly documenting failure modes, labor times, etc. Deere is one of the few MFGs, that I can think of, that is so hands-off with warranty.

Dealers will often take matters into their own hands to make things right for customers. The 'regional rep' (TCSM) really only gets involved for grey areas and for any possible out of warranty assistance.
 

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The gray are was more of my reference....a lot of exceptions are made to profitable dealers and agents.....been there done that Insurance business 46 years and the same exceptions were used....
 
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