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Discussion Starter #1
I'm restoring our screened in porch at the back of the house and I'm in the middle of a big caulking effort. I've used a manual, squeeze-the-handles type caulk gun for a lot of years, but my hands don't seem up to the task anymore.

I'm considering one of these cordless electric guns (probably Ryobi 18V, since I already use that system).

ry caulk gun.JPG

I'm not the most artistic caulker anyway, and I was always concerned that the caulk would come out of these powered caulk guns too fast. I know I'm also adding weight with the battery, but I'll live with that. I've also considered a pneumatic caulk gun, but I think dragging around the air line would be very irritating.

I'd like to hear from anyone with experience with a powered caulk gun. Is the flow manageable? Did you end up wearing more caulk than with a manual gun?

Keane
 

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I'm restoring our screened in porch at the back of the house and I'm in the middle of a big caulking effort. I've used a manual, squeeze-the-handles type caulk gun for a lot of years, but my hands don't seem up to the task anymore.

I'm considering one of these cordless electric guns (probably Ryobi 18V, since I already use that system).

View attachment 451218

I'm not the most artistic caulker anyway, and I was always concerned that the caulk would come out of these powered caulk guns too fast. I know I'm also adding weight with the battery, but I'll live with that. I've also considered a pneumatic caulk gun, but I think dragging around the air line would be very irritating.

I'd like to hear from anyone with experience with a powered caulk gun. Is the flow manageable? Did you end up wearing more caulk than with a manual gun?

Keane
My suggestion, buy one from Home Depot, if you don't like how it flows return it.

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I'm restoring our screened in porch at the back of the house and I'm in the middle of a big caulking effort. I've used a manual, squeeze-the-handles type caulk gun for a lot of years, but my hands don't seem up to the task anymore.

I'm considering one of these cordless electric guns (probably Ryobi 18V, since I already use that system).

View attachment 451218

I'm not the most artistic caulker anyway, and I was always concerned that the caulk would come out of these powered caulk guns too fast. I know I'm also adding weight with the battery, but I'll live with that. I've also considered a pneumatic caulk gun, but I think dragging around the air line would be very irritating.

I'd like to hear from anyone with experience with a powered caulk gun. Is the flow manageable? Did you end up wearing more caulk than with a manual gun?

Keane
I have the Makita 18 volt version and like it for big projects but they do get heavy after a while, probably not the best for lots of overhead work. The Makita has adjustable flow (looks like the Ryobi does to) and one nice feature of the Makita is when the trigger is released it releases the pressure on the tube so the calk stops flowing instantly unlike the hand squeeze models where the calk keeps coming out until you release the rod latch.
 

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I actually did buy the Ryobi model shown. It sounds like such a nice idea to be able to just pull a trigger to do the work for you. The problem that I had with the Ryobi is that there was too much caulk that came out after the trigger was released. It was messy and not nearly as easy as I had hoped it would be. The gun added enough weight and length that, after a few minutes, I went back to a manual caulk gun. And then I returned the gun to Home Depot. For me anyway, it was a disappontment. If they had included an automatic reversing or pressure release function that worked every time you released the trigger, it would have been OK.
My manual caulking gun does require me to push a lever to release the pressure immediately when I want the flow to stop, but to me that is OK. I feel that I have more control that way too.
The reviews on the Home Depot website paint a much more positive view of this gun compared to my experience with it. Part of the difference may be due to my application. We have cedar siding, which requires a constant change of flow because variations in the gaps. Although the flow on the gun can be regulated, it's more suited to caulking a joint that is more consistent in width. It would also be helpful, I think, when you're putting down something that has a really high viscosity, like structural adhesives.
 

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I actually did buy the Ryobi model shown. It sounds like such a nice idea to be able to just pull a trigger to do the work for you. The problem that I had with the Ryobi is that there was too much caulk that came out after the trigger was released. It was messy and not nearly as easy as I had hoped it would be. The gun added enough weight and length that, after a few minutes, I went back to a manual caulk gun. And then I returned the gun to Home Depot. For me anyway, it was a disappontment. If they had included an automatic reversing or pressure release function that worked every time you released the trigger, it would have been OK.
My manual caulking gun does require me to push a lever to release the pressure immediately when I want the flow to stop, but to me that is OK. I feel that I have more control that way too.
The reason the caulking keeps coming out is because the tube is too cool. The cooler the tube the harder you have to squeeze the trigger. I generally put it in my engine compartment on the way home from the hardware store or leave it out in the sun before use. Hope that helps.

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We built a screened in porch, 15X28, screened on 3 sides,, ~20 years ago,,,
there is ZERO caulking on our porch,, did I do something wrong??

I thought caulking was mainly used to stop drafts,,, :dunno:

I would love to see pics of your porch!! :good2:
 

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and one nice feature of the Makita is when the trigger is released it releases the pressure on the tube so the calk stops flowing instantly unlike the hand squeeze models where the calk keeps coming out until you release the rod latch.
The Milwaukee has the same pressure release system. I can't imagine using an electric caulk gun without this feature.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
We built a screened in porch, 15X28, screened on 3 sides,, ~20 years ago,,,
there is ZERO caulking on our porch,, did I do something wrong??

I thought caulking was mainly used to stop drafts,,, :dunno:

I would love to see pics of your porch!! :good2:
The caulking is to keep water from getting into and building up in the wooden frames supporting the screens. I'm restoring the porch to the way the builder originally constructed it because right now this is clearly the least expensive path for me. I've imagined many different ways to frame the screens, but strength is an issue. We get violent winds here in the foothills of the Rockies. With the winds come a lot of horizontal rain and snow. I've never lost one of these big screens due to wind with the current method of framing, although the wind has destroyed the screen door to this porch twice and once it blew it into and damaged one of the big screens. I finally replaced the screen door on this porch with a security door, bars and everything. So far this has foiled the wind. And it does look a little weird to have a security door on a screened in porch.

I think the original builder did make a mistake by using pine for the screen framing. I don't think there's any way to keep all the moisture out of a metal screen frame, and it eventually works its way into the wood framing around it. I've replaced any compromised wood in this porch with redwood. I starting doing that about 10 years ago. So far, the redwood pieces I've put in have been unaffected by the moisture. Before I do this again, I'm going to get some quotes for aluminum frames for the metal-framed screens. I like improving things to reduce maintenance and rework.

I'll post some pictures when I get it done, maybe early next week.

Keane
 

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~25 years ago, when we built our porch, we put up this "temporary" screen.
We figured after a few years,, I would get a carpenter to do it properly.

I pre-stained some treated 2x4's, and nailed them up, then stapled screen to the 2x4's,,,





I never got around to having it rebuild,, and it still looks like this.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So I went ahead and bought the Ryobi caulk gun. I did not run into the trouble that Neb did with the caulk continuing to come out. But my caulk was warm. It is a bit unwieldy because of its weight and length. I used the small battery with it and for the purposes of my screened-in porch, the length did not keep me from caulking what I needed to caulk. I can imagine situations where it simply could not get into where you want to caulk. I really liked how fast and consistently I could apply caulk with this gun. I'm going to keep it.

CADplans requested pictures of the screened-in porch. I've finished replacing and restoring the rotted areas, primed the new bare wood pieces (8 total) and any bare spots from scraping or repairing, caulked all the cracks, and put 2 coats of Kwal Liquid Vinyl on everything. Now it's more photogenic:

2017-09-19 13.34.02.jpg

2017-09-19 13.34.39.jpg

2017-09-19 13.36.04.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
As I was scraping the paint on the screened-in porch to prepare it for painting, I got a surprise when I ran the scraper over the bottom of the center 4X4's. The paint used on this porch is really tough, and it was doing a good job of hiding rotted wood. When I scraped the paint off, there was some of each center post rotted out and a very small patch on one of the end 4x4's.

The worst center post looked like this:

2017-09-04 19.37.16.jpg

I used a product called Mr. Mack's wood fix. Home Depot used to carry it, but they don't make it anymore. It was a blend of mortar cement and polymer. It has a great consistency for shaping and filling rotted wood. If it needed to be sanded, you had to do it about an hour after the repair was made. It gets harder and harder, much stronger than the original wood, with amazing adhesion. If you waited a day to sand it, you'd be out of luck. I learned that the hard way once.

If anybody knows of a product like Mr. Macks, please let me know. I don't have much left.

The posts are not load bearing, and the rot was not very deep. If the problem recurs in a few years, I'll replace them with redwood 4x4's.

Here's what the finished center post looks like:

2017-09-19 13.37.33.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I was always frustrated when I had to caulk between surfaces that were different colors. I've seen people try to solve this by using clear caulk. Now you have 3 colors in the game, especially after the clear caulk yellows. I wanted a clean line, but I didn't have the physical coordination to get one.

A painter that painted our house when it was built showed me a good trick. He had amazingly clean lines on his caulk, even when the joined surfaces were different colors.

On the surface whose color is not the same as the caulk, you put painter's tape about 1/8 inch from the other surface:

2017-09-17 10.49.17.jpg

Then you caulk with the gun and smooth the caulk with your finger or other tool:

2017-09-17 10.54.34.jpg

Then carefully pull the painter's tape off, starting at either end:

2017-09-17 10.56.14.jpg

You get a nice, clean line between the different surfaces.

Keane
 
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