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Well, do we, for Deere at least?

JD's literature is extremely brief. For example, telling me 24HP versus 24HP -EFI, is insignificant. Telling me Briggs and Stratton versus Kawasaki liquid cooled is significantly more detailed.
 

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TractorData.com Has a lot of information on many brands of tractors and lawn tractors
 

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When comparing various equipment I download the spec or data sheets and make a chart to compare. That way I put the more important aspects to me toward the top of the list.

Yes - I’m talking about a handwritten list or table - old school.
 

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When comparing various equipment I download the spec or data sheets and make a chart to compare. That way I put the more important aspects to me toward the top of the list.

Yes - I’m talking about a handwritten list or table - old school.
I do that too.

If it ends up with lots of different categories, I make a spreadsheet up in Excel or something similar.
Thats what I did before I bought the 2025. Worked out pretty good there...and I dont have to worry about where I put the paper, which happens all the darn time when I just write it down.
 

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I wouldn't use tractordata.com. I would use Deere's webpage or a dealer. But, there is a difference in the quality of lawn tractors Deere makes, i.e. the D or the current E series are of inferior quality than the X-series. X300 series are lawn tractors, X500 series are more like yard tractors or less capable garden tractors and the X700 series are garden tractors. For a better comparison, go to a dealer and actually physically look over the tractors and look at the features and the quality of build.

Deere makes tractors at price points, but also at what the tractor was designed to do. Don't be swayed by engine horsepower, but the construction around the engine and what the tractor's intended purpose is.
 

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I wouldn't use tractordata.com. I would use Deere's webpage or a dealer. But, there is a difference in the quality of lawn tractors Deere makes, i.e. the D or the current E series are of inferior quality than the X-series. X300 series are lawn tractors, X500 series are more like yard tractors or less capable garden tractors and the X700 series are garden tractors. For a better comparison, go to a dealer and actually physically look over the tractors and look at the features and the quality of build.

Deere makes tractors at price points, but also at what the tractor was designed to do. Don't be swayed by engine horsepower, but the construction around the engine and what the tractor's intended purpose is.
That’s true - most everything these days is made to a price point.

The average Joe when looking at lawn tractors will put 90% weight to engine horsepower when making a decision. It is the main marketing point for that reason. But there is so much more involved - trying to find where brand X cheapened things up compared to brand Y to come to the same price point.
 

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X300 series are lawn tractors, X500 series are more like yard tractors or less capable garden tractors and the X700 series are garden tractors.
I wouldn't say that at all. The X300 are lawn tractors, yes (and excellent ones!). But the X500 are definitely garden tractors. If you compare them with what the competition calls garden tractors, they are usually superior. The K72 is a very heavy duty transmission capable of all kinds of serious ground engagement tasks, such as tilling and even plowing (you can get a powered sleeve hitch for them). There are a few garden tractors that are on par with them, but I am not aware of anything called a garden tractor that is better (except the X700 series, of course).

The X700 series are not garden tractors at all, in my opinion. Some people call them "super garden tractors," but I like to call them "hobbled SCUTs." Hobbled in the sense that they are SCUTs in terms of capability, but John Deere took away their loader and sells them without three points or rear PTOs (though those can be added). I guess the way they are sold, the "super garden tractor" label is the most accurate.

No one but John Deere makes anything like the X700 series. Amazing machines.
 

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I wouldn't use tractordata.com. I would use Deere's webpage or a dealer. But, there is a difference in the quality of lawn tractors Deere makes, i.e. the D or the current E series are of inferior quality than the X-series. X300 series are lawn tractors, X500 series are more like yard tractors or less capable garden tractors and the X700 series are garden tractors. For a better comparison, go to a dealer and actually physically look over the tractors and look at the features and the quality of build.

Deere makes tractors at price points, but also at what the tractor was designed to do. Don't be swayed by engine horsepower, but the construction around the engine and what the tractor's intended purpose is.
For current models yes, but if buying used, I find tractordata.com much faster and easier to compare. It does not help there was an x4XX series that became the x5XX series, (that in no way the same as the current x5XX series) that became the x7XX series. :nunu: :banghead:

I can understand John Deere no longer having specs on past models, they want to sell current models.
 

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I wouldn't say that at all. The X300 are lawn tractors, yes (and excellent ones!). But the X500 are definitely garden tractors. If you compare them with what the competition calls garden tractors, they are usually superior. The K72 is a very heavy duty transmission capable of all kinds of serious ground engagement tasks, such as tilling and even plowing (you can get a powered sleeve hitch for them). There are a few garden tractors that are on par with them, but I am not aware of anything called a garden tractor that is better (except the X700 series, of course).

The X700 series are not garden tractors at all, in my opinion. Some people call them "super garden tractors," but I like to call them "hobbled SCUTs." Hobbled in the sense that they are SCUTs in terms of capability, but John Deere took away their loader and sells them without three points or rear PTOs (though those can be added). I guess the way they are sold, the "super garden tractor" label is the most accurate.

No one but John Deere makes anything like the X700 series. Amazing machines.
I guess there is nothing wrong with a different label, but I still prefer the way its always been with Deere, that they are just garden tractors.
Just because they are bigger and better garden tractors doesnt make them something else.

In the late 70s when the big garden tractors came out, there was the 300 series and the 400 series.
There wasnt much out there to compete with the 400 series, especially the 430 in the late 80s. There still isnt much that can.
Heck, the 90s 400 series really didnt have any competition either (425,455 etc).
The X700 series, previously the X500 series, is comparable to the older 400 series in size and capability.
They all had loaders available back then, as did the 300 series, which you cant get for the 500 series.

Anyway, just because nobody else makes something comparable, or calls a certain size tractor by a different name/classification, doesnt mean its not what it is.
Everyone else is getting smaller, and they always have been. Deere is the only one thats continued to make the large garden tractors.

Its always been my opinion that if you can get a hitch for ground engaging equipment, then its a garden tractor (thats actually the designations intent, that you can do gardening work with it like tilling, plowing, etc). Another requirement for me is bolt on rear wheels. There are some running around that are more in line with Deeres X300 series that are calling them garden tractors, and they arent.

I think too that the designations are lost on a lot of people (not many of us here obviously), because they just dont understand the difference. They see a small "rider" with a mowing deck and its a "lawn mower" to them. It never occurs to them that they can do so much more.
Because of this I believe the designations that used to be used are just thrown out.
We used to have:
Lawn Mowers. Most heavily used for mowing. MIGHT pull a cart once in a while, but not really intended to do much more than mow.
Lawn Tractors. Above plus heavier duty transmissions for pulling carts and doing lawn work. Will not use ground engaging equipment.
Garden Tractors. Above plus even heavier duty transmission designed for ground engaging work.

Now it seems we are combining the middle group into the other two.


In any case, I wish there was a guide out there somewhere, but that would be a massive undertaking.
I was looking (still am here and there) for a LT/GT for my neighbor, but have no idea what Im after. I know most of Deeres stuff up until about 95, then not much until more recently. GTs I can figure out easy enough, as Ive always kind of followed those, but the LTs I never really did. A guide would certainly help with that kind of stuff.

Makes me wonder if we could use Google Docs or something similar where people could add models and information about them as they find them.
I have a couple old full line catalogs from years past, and Im sure others do too. Id be willing to bet that between all the members here we probably have all the information on all the years from late 80s until now.
The list would be MASSIVE though.
 

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I wouldn't use tractordata.com. I would use Deere's webpage or a dealer. But, there is a difference in the quality of lawn tractors Deere makes, i.e. the D or the current E series are of inferior quality than the X-series. X300 series are lawn tractors, X500 series are more like yard tractors or less capable garden tractors and the X700 series are garden tractors. For a better comparison, go to a dealer and actually physically look over the tractors and look at the features and the quality of build.

Deere makes tractors at price points, but also at what the tractor was designed to do. Don't be swayed by engine horsepower, but the construction around the engine and what the tractor's intended purpose is.



That's exactly my point. It would be a Deere enthusiast who compiled all the data. It would show stuff Deere would likely never admit (such as a Briggs engine having half a life span of a Kawasaki, for example.)
 

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That's exactly my point. It would be a Deere enthusiast who compiled all the data. It would show stuff Deere would likely never admit (such as a Briggs engine having half a life span of a Kawasaki, for example.)
I found errors in tractordata.com that most here wouldn't spot. And to say that a Deere enthusiast compiled the data isn't accurate either as anyone can. Just because it's on tractordata.com doesn't make it true - you need to do more research and go to the source. This site and WFM are better sites to get the correct information from.
 

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I found errors in tractordata.com that most here wouldn't spot. And to say that a Deere enthusiast compiled the data isn't accurate either as anyone can. Just because it's on tractordata.com doesn't make it true - you need to do more research and go to the source. This site and WFM are better sites to get the correct information from.
Have you emailed Peter at TractorData with corrections? I did for the JD2030 and he changed what he had that was wrong.

What I like about TractorData, is you can pick a brand and you can see a list of all models with HP, Deck Sizes, and years produced. From there you can click on a model and find out more.
 
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