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Here's another dumb electronics question. Now the wife wants a credenza to put under the wall mounted TV. The one she likes has two glass doors with shelves behind the glass doors. She wants the Satellite control box & the DVD player to go on a shelf behind the glass door. My question is will the glass cause a problem with the remote signal to the devices? My gut tells me there should be no problem unless the signal from the remote to the device gets bounced back by glare from the glass.

I know my questions are so dumb, but I am so electronics challenged & all this junk is so expensive to buy & really a problem if you want to return an item so I need to be careful with what I do. Don't worry, I won't file a law suit on you if it doesn't work out. I hate this stuff. Why can't they make it with nuts & bolts cause that's what I know.

:banghead:
 

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This is a real good question to ask before spending money on something that might not work! My in-laws have their DVD player and cable box inside a glass door credenza. It works fine.
 

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I have a bunch of remote controlled stuff in a cabinet. I have 2 Xboxes , a WII and a 500 watt surround system in the cabinet. I worry about the heat sometimes. I just open the door to let it cool.
 

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Same here. No problems with the control boxes/DVR behind the glass door. The remotes works just fine.

 

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The first thing that came to my mind is heat dispersion - but it seems folks have already posted their equipment inside a caninet with doors.

All I have to go by is my Tivo unit which does give off heat. In fact it is no different than a desktop PC that has air intakes and an exhaust fan. When the room gets warm I can hear the fan ramp up.

I also have Roku units that have no active cooling but feel warm to the touch when being used.
 

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Most remotes will not have a problem with glass or wood doors for that matter, heat can be a issue but unless it is on 24/7 should not be issue either.
 

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If the glass blocks the infrared signal I guess it could cause problems (but it isnt likely). If you have access to the cabinet before buying, you could always take the remote and a digital camera with you and test it.

Cameras can "see" well into the infrared spectrum that remotes use. To see this, point your digital camera (including cell phone cameras) at the remote and press a button on the remote. You will see it light up as it works.

If you can put the glass between the remote and camera and still see it lighting up on the camera, I would think you would have no problems.
 

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You should be good as long as you have a line of sight with the IR remotes. If you are using UHF remotes, it will not make any difference. To see what type you have, look at the back of your unit, receiver box. If there is an antennae sticking up, you have UHF remote. Other wise it will be IR.
 

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You should be good as long as you have a line of sight with the IR remotes. If you are using UHF remotes, it will not make any difference. To see what type you have, look at the back of your unit, receiver box. If there is an antennae sticking up, you have UHF remote. Other wise it will be IR.
What about WiFi? My Roku 3 remote is WiFi.
 

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Glass shouldn't be an issue unless it is coated for UV/IR blocking and you are using an IR remote.

That said, there are often times an IR remote receiver that is shipped with cable boxes and other electronics. They are typically a little puck with an 1/8" "headphone" jack on them and double sided tape. These can be plugged into the device and remotely located so that they can receive the signal if need be.

I never used one before as I never needed to. Last year I put a TV on top of the refrigerator with a cable box. The box was too far behind the upper door lip to get a signal so I used the remote receiver by sticking it on the top side of the nearest cabinet...worked like a charm.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Glass shouldn't be an issue unless it is coated for UV/IR blocking and you are using an IR remote.

That said, there are often times an IR remote receiver that is shipped with cable boxes and other electronics. They are typically a little puck with an 1/8" "headphone" jack on them and double sided tape. These can be plugged into the device and remotely located so that they can receive the signal if need be.

I never used one before as I never needed to. Last year I put a TV on top of the refrigerator with a cable box. The box was too far behind the upper door lip to get a signal so I used the remote receiver by sticking it on the top side of the nearest cabinet...worked like a charm.
I find what you said here very interesting about that little "puck" thingie. While I'm trying to learn about this stuff, another question now comes to mind. My TV service is by satellite. It's the only choice we have where I live, either Dish or Direct satellite service. My question is: We have what we call our TV room here at the house. Large screen TV on the wall & the satellite control box in the same room. Now let's say I want to put a small TV in another room, like our guest bedroom which is like a good 35 feet from our TV room. Do I need to get another satellite box from the service provider? How does this work. I should say also my house is wired so the lines are already in the walls. I've also been told by the DISH people if I want any of the other rooms to receive the signal, I need to call them so they can come out to the house & add the signal to the guest bedroom line. I really don't want black boxes all over my house. Also I'm told I will be paying a charge for each line that is activated. The charge is monthly regardless if I use the added connection or not.

All of this stuff is a giant ripoff. I grew up with UHF &VHF rooftop antenna & channels 2 thru 13. I remember as a kid the wars people would have when the stinking politicians & the networks wanted to charge the TV owner a monthly fee for watching TV. No more free TV! Really! Now we gladly fork over anywhere from $75-$200 to watch five hundred channels of the same crap on multiple channels. Movies on TV. If you like seeing the same movie over & over again for six months & paying gladly for it I guess it's a bargain. No matter how good a movie is, after seeing it I never want to see it a second time, so its a lot cheaper to get the disc I want from Netflix in the mail.
 

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All of this stuff is a giant ripoff. I grew up with UHF &VHF rooftop antenna & channels 2 thru 13. I remember as a kid the wars people would have when the stinking politicians & the networks wanted to charge the TV owner a monthly fee for watching TV. No more free TV! Really! Now we gladly fork over anywhere from $75-$200 to watch five hundred channels of the same crap on multiple channels. Movies on TV. If you like seeing the same movie over & over again for six months & paying gladly for it I guess it's a bargain. No matter how good a movie is, after seeing it I never want to see it a second time, so its a lot cheaper to get the disc I want from Netflix in the mail.
This is why I went with streaming TV now. The dish/cable companies have been getting rich for far too long. They get paid through advertisements the also get paid by the consumer for the service. I refuse to pay to have advertisements channeled into my house.

I now subscribe to 3 streaming services - Netflix, Hulu, and CBS all with no commercials whatsoever. It costs me $32 per month for all 3 and have tens of thousands of shows to watch including new stuff.
 

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On InfraRed and glass: The IR from a remote control is just below the visible spectrum. So if you can see though the glass, no problem. Even the metal film "low E" glass is OK, it reflect long wave infrared. And since all coatings cost money, I doubt anything has it. Now if the glass is tinted, there will be some reduction. And then you have a YMMV situation.

On a 2nd TV for satellite: You can rent tother box for about $5/month and run two coaxes to it. Or you can run 3 cases and some audio wire and run the composite out to a TV. Also run wires for a remote IR extender consisting of a receiver at the TV and a IR emitting diode sender at your satellite receiver.
This used to work "perfect", and then the silly folks in LA who worry about copy protection had Direct TV update the firmware so you can only use the composite if there is an HDMI TV connected and running. So now, to watch the TV in the bedroom we have to leave the main TV on. At night, we just put that TV on a 2 hour timer.

So $60 a year and 2 coaxes, or, mess around with IR extenders and running more wires and having to use the timer on your main TV. Note that w/r/t/ running wires, it's not how many wires you run, it's how many times you have to pull wires through. So if you buy the 500' box of coax, you will have to do a pull per coax.

It's never simple, and the powers that be work to keep it that way...

Pete
 

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I have a bunch of remote controlled stuff in a cabinet. I have 2 Xboxes , a WII and a 500 watt surround system in the cabinet. I worry about the heat sometimes. I just open the door to let it cool.
Mostly not related. The Xbox and Wii remotes don't operate on IR, or at least not on IR exclusively.

What about WiFi? My Roku 3 remote is WiFi.
You should be good as long as you have a line of sight with the IR remotes. If you are using UHF remotes, it will not make any difference. To see what type you have, look at the back of your unit, receiver box. If there is an antennae sticking up, you have UHF remote. Other wise it will be IR.
Glass shouldn't be an issue unless it is coated for UV/IR blocking and you are using an IR remote.

That said, there are often times an IR remote receiver that is shipped with cable boxes and other electronics. They are typically a little puck with an 1/8" "headphone" jack on them and double sided tape. These can be plugged into the device and remotely located so that they can receive the signal if need be.

I never used one before as I never needed to. Last year I put a TV on top of the refrigerator with a cable box. The box was too far behind the upper door lip to get a signal so I used the remote receiver by sticking it on the top side of the nearest cabinet...worked like a charm.


Can you use a cabinet with doors? Glass doors? Steel doors? It all really depends on the remotes and how they work.

I have a DirecTV Genie HR-54 and it works with a UHF remote. I have an Xbox One S and the controllers operate on Bluetooth. I have a Pioneer Audio/Video Receiver whose remote operates on IR. I have a Sony BluRay DVD player whose remote operates on IR.

I have all of these devices in a "closet" that's behind the wall that the TV is on, and here's how everything works:

- The Pioneer receiver uses an IR repeater of sorts that sits under the TV. Pointing the remote at the TV allows me to control the receiver because the repeater device carries the signal into the closet.

- The DirecTV DVR operates "through the wall" without issue (UHF).

- The Xbox operates "through the wall" without issues (Bluetooth).

- The DVD player is controlled over HDMI (CEC - Consumer Electronics Control) via the TV remote without issue.

Similar to the "which port do I plug my DVD player into" question in the other thread you started, there's a reasonable amount of "it depends" that goes into the answer for you, but you should generally have no issue so long as the frame of the door doesn't block the IR port on the device.

WiFi, like UHF and BT, goes through walls. So no issue there. :)
 
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