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I took my bush hog into the local dealer to have the blades removed and sharpened. I say removed because I couldn't remove the nut myself using a breaker and cheater. After about 20 minutes I stuck my head into the shop to check on his progress and found him under the bushhog sharpening the blades with them still attached. Ordinarily I'm fine with this but I also wanted him to remove the nuts, put some grease or anti-seize on the threads so I could remove them by hand if needed sometime down the road. I purchased this bush hog a few months ago, it's used, and it looks like the blades have not been off in years. I don't have a 3/4 impact which is what I think it would take to remove the nuts otherwise I would have done it myself. It's an AGCO Farmhand rc250 is that matters.

He said they don't normally remove the blades because the bolt and nut should be replaced every time they are removed, they are normally torqued at 1000ft/lbs and the bolts need to be driven out of the stump jumper which will eventually "wallow" out the holes. Does this sound right or was he trying to shoo me away?
 

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Normally we have always replaced the blades. I never have sharpened the blades. We always sell the hardware with it as well. It is what’s recommended. If your in a tight spot you could re-use but it’s best to replace the hardware.


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I answered my own question. I checked three owners manuals for bush hogs of similar size and construction (2 from Land {ride and 1 Woods). Interestingly all three referenced the same torque on the nuts (450lbs) and said to replace them as needed. So there you go.
 

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Do you have a Bernzomatic torch? Normally a bit of heat will help crack those nuts loose.
 

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Sounds right, we always sharpen blades still on, not like we are trying to get a razors edge on them. But when we have replaced them we always buy the hardware kit.
 

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Don't know if this will help you in the future but whenever I run across a stubborn nut and bolt, a bit of heat from the bern-so-match followed with some candle wax melted on the threads works better than penetrating oil
 

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Sounds right, we always sharpen blades still on, not like we are trying to get a razors edge on them. But when we have replaced them we always buy the hardware kit.
Well maybe YOU arent....:lol:
 

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Do you have a Bernzomatic torch? Normally a bit of heat will help crack those nuts loose.
I don't have a torch but it would likely take a lot of heat based on the size of the bolts we're dealing with. Really though a 3/4 impact should do the trick and then I can put some anti-seize on the threads so I can remove them in the future.
 

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I have an ancient 5' Bush Hog brand mower. Back in the day. I used a come-along and chains to tilt up the deck against a couple of Persimmon trees in my yard, then sharpened the blades with an angle grinder. It was a old Hog when I came on the scene here in the mid 1980's; I would not be surprised if they were the original blades. I've never tried to remove them. I don't know what tools that I would need to generate 1000 ft-lbs of torque here.

It's forecast to finally begin cooling off this week. I'll be dragging the Hog out of the barn for the first time in many years. I plan to use the FEL and chains to tilt the deck to access and sharpen the blades before a long overdue bush whacking session.

Good luck, please let the forum know about your outcome,

Brian

I took my bush hog into the local dealer to have the blades removed and sharpened. I say removed because I couldn't remove the nut myself using a breaker and cheater. After about 20 minutes I stuck my head into the shop to check on his progress and found him under the bushhog sharpening the blades with them still attached. Ordinarily I'm fine with this but I also wanted him to remove the nuts, put some grease or anti-seize on the threads so I could remove them by hand if needed sometime down the road. I purchased this bush hog a few months ago, it's used, and it looks like the blades have not been off in years. I don't have a 3/4 impact which is what I think it would take to remove the nuts otherwise I would have done it myself. It's an AGCO Farmhand rc250 is that matters.

He said they don't normally remove the blades because the bolt and nut should be replaced every time they are removed, they are normally torqued at 1000ft/lbs and the bolts need to be driven out of the stump jumper which will eventually "wallow" out the holes. Does this sound right or was he trying to shoo me away?
 

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I always remove to sharpen. With the Woods boltless system, it takes 5 minutes to remove.
 

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Been there

I can tell you from sad experience that removing that castle nut is crazy hard. I needed to do it in order to replace the bottom seal. 3/4" breaker bar and cheater didn't do it even with a second person hammering on it. 3/4" impact wrench that claimed to generate 1,100 ft lbs didn't do it. It finally took a heck of a lot of heat plus a cheater bar and two good sized men putting everything on it to get it started.

Would I attempt it to sharpen the blades? That's a no, it ain't worth going through that again. In fact if it ever has to come off again, I'll probably use a die grinder and cut almost all the way through the nut leaving just enough so I don't nick the threads before putting pressure on it.

The swing arm bolts/pins weren't as bad as the castle nut. I'll pull them off if I ever need to swap blades but as far as sharpening, again no, won't do that either. Tilt that sucker on it's side, chain it securely and use a grinder to put a minimal edge on it and go back to mowing.

Treefarmer
 

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I took my bush hog into the local dealer to have the blades removed and sharpened. I say removed because I couldn't remove the nut myself using a breaker and cheater. After about 20 minutes I stuck my head into the shop to check on his progress and found him under the bushhog sharpening the blades with them still attached. Ordinarily I'm fine with this but I also wanted him to remove the nuts, put some grease or anti-seize on the threads so I could remove them by hand if needed sometime down the road. I purchased this bush hog a few months ago, it's used, and it looks like the blades have not been off in years. I don't have a 3/4 impact which is what I think it would take to remove the nuts otherwise I would have done it myself. It's an AGCO Farmhand rc250 is that matters.

He said they don't normally remove the blades because the bolt and nut should be replaced every time they are removed, they are normally torqued at 1000ft/lbs and the bolts need to be driven out of the stump jumper which will eventually "wallow" out the holes. Does this sound right or was he trying to shoo me away?

I'm facing that same dilemma with my 10ft Rhino brush hog. I sharpened the blades already, but I have a vibration that I think is coming from one of the blades that has a little bent upturn to it. So I am looking to just replace them and it appears that it is best to replace the bolts also. The carrier bolt has a cotter key in it, but the blade bolts use only a hardened lock washer. I may wind up just taking off the carrier to make replacements easier. The blade bolts cost almost as much as the blades themselves. I am really thinking these are the original blades and this brush hog was only made from 1988-1993. Definitely time to be replaced. I do have a 1100 lb Milwaukee 18V impact wrench to help out.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I have an ancient 5' Bush Hog brand mower. Back in the day. I used a come-along and chains to tilt up the deck against a couple of Persimmon trees in my yard, then sharpened the blades with an angle grinder. It was a old Hog when I came on the scene here in the mid 1980's; I would not be surprised if they were the original blades. I've never tried to remove them. I don't know what tools that I would need to generate 1000 ft-lbs of torque here.

It's forecast to finally begin cooling off this week. I'll be dragging the Hog out of the barn for the first time in many years. I plan to use the FEL and chains to tilt the deck to access and sharpen the blades before a long overdue bush whacking session.

Good luck, please let the forum know about your outcome,

Brian
Well, I checked with all my mechanic friends and none have a 3/4 impact so for now I'm leaving well enough alone. The blades have seen better days but they are pretty well balanced and that'll get me through fall brush cutting. After I'm done I will revisit the blades, find someone who can get the nuts broken loose and I will sharpen the blades in preparation for next year.

The blades were in horrible shape, they were serrated but not by choic and I suspect poles and rocks were used to re,over chunks from the blades. This is the main reason why I took it to the dealer, best $30 spent in a while because he was hacking on those blades for a while.
 

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Well, I checked with all my mechanic friends and none have a 3/4 impact so for now I'm leaving well enough alone. The blades have seen better days but they are pretty well balanced and that'll get me through fall brush cutting. After I'm done I will revisit the blades, find someone who can get the nuts broken loose and I will sharpen the blades in preparation for next year.

The blades were in horrible shape, they were serrated but not by choic and I suspect poles and rocks were used to re,over chunks from the blades. This is the main reason why I took it to the dealer, best $30 spent in a while because he was hacking on those blades for a while.
I still say one of these is your best investment (use MAPP gas bottle). Followed by some penetrating oil and a breaker bar (+ cheater) or a 1/2" impact.

 

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Removing Bush Hog Blades

Removing (and reinstalling) the nuts usually requires a torque multiplier...that's how my dealer does it and it works well for me also. The tool I bought is in the link below. The nuts are torqued on to around 500-600 foot pounds.

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200623947_200623947?cm_mmc=Google-pla&utm_source=Google_PLA&utm_medium=Hand Tools > Wrenches > Torque Wrenches&utm_campaign=Klutch&utm_content=41488&gclid=Cj0KCQjwn4ncBRCaARIsAFD5-gVuSzapwwa4p4I5jc7A1jHsIeboz5c2OiXoDBaFD4Mn-UoC4rwxelkaAhTSEALw_wcB
 

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The air wrench needed to remove these nuts in one used on heavy equipment. It's a 1 inch drive requiring a very high volume of air usually supplied by an industrial gas or diesel engine driven air compressor. Most logical and easiest way to sharpen those blades is leaving them on the brush hog. A lot less headache. Perfect example of "if it ain't broke don't try to fix it".
 

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I lift my rotary mowers up with the loader, block it up for safety and take a 4.5" angle grinder to the blades. A year or so ago I bought a "lightly used" Frontier MX6 from a private party, when I finally had a look at the blades, it was ugly. In all fairness we have lots of rocks in central Texas, even being careful I always hit one at the first mowing of the year.
 
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