Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've got the forks and bucket done. The forks dolly is low to the ground so it can have either the bucket or the front plow stored "on top" of it.

Probably could have made the front bucket dolly about 6" shorter, but this size makes it easy to put the bucket down.

Will post pix of the other two dollies when they are done. The ballast box is done, I've just got a lot of mods to make and have to fill it up 1st.

I have other pix of dollies if anyone's interested. You can kinda see the tiller and PHD dollies in the background.

Have "mac" to real world photo issue, on the MAC it's upright, here it's sideways. I've straightened it up*on the next post.

Pete
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Lets see if this is upright now. No one really understands this computer stuff...

Pete
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,564 Posts
Very nice, where did you get your casters? I am planning on doing somewhat of the same thing for my MX-6.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,542 Posts
Nice work Pete! One dolly for both! By the way, do you use that bucket? It looks new! :laugh: I made a dolly for my ballast box. Got 4 X 1 1/4 rubber castors on ebay rated for 250lbs each. $25 with free shipping!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,027 Posts
Good deal on making the dollies Pete. As for the pictures being rotated, MAC's suffer from LSD flashbacks that Steve Jobs programmed into them. :laugh:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Got the casters at Northern Tool. All Made in China, so I assume that the actual load will be half the rated load.

The forks are on their own little dolly. I have 8 250# small castors, the forks weigh 400#. They are at the front and rear of the pallet, I'll take some more pix. Northern had a special and it was $20 for a box of 4.
There are 4 casters under the area where each tine will rest. There's a layers of sacrificial 1/2" plywood that's just screwed on to the dolly.

The bucket dolly is on higher castors, they are 500# castors (qty 4). I don't have a weight on the bucket, am guessing 500# or so? So once the forks are on their dolly, they slide in under the bucket dolly (and will slide in under the plow dolly).
The bucket dolly is not too strong in the middle- it is 3/4 plywood with some 2x4's around the edges and in the middle so a person can step on the dolly. It counts on 2x8's at the end of the dolly and the castors to support the weight.

The ballast box dolly is straight forward, it has 4 400# castors.

The plow dolly is overkill, the plow weights maybee 400# or so, but uses very tall 650# castors. It's all set up so that the plow and the forks will occupy the same space. It was a bonus that the forks can also fit under the bucket for times when the plow is on the loader.

On the one hand, the cost of the castors is high. The 650# guys were around $18 each (IRRC). But a little overkill now and you never have to mess with it again. I've seen too many times where someone runs at 80% of the rating of the castors, hits a small object, and it's failure time. Big wheels are nice too, 4" or more if possible. Had to break that rule for the 2.5" castors for the forks to get them low, but with 8 of them on there, it should be OK.

The bucket is new, looking forward to breaking it in sometime soon. Heck, everything is new... Will post more pix later.

Pete
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,466 Posts
Pete, all those dollies look great! If you only had a welder...


Have you thought about getting some used pallet racking/shelving to keep things up off of the floor?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Now that I have forks, the stack 'em high is an option. Down sided is during the summer, the loader will be off the tractor for mowing. So when I run out of room, I'll go that route.

How many times do you contract out welding before you buy one...?? :flag_of_truce:

Three pix. The first one shows the forks and bucket dollies at "ground level". You can see where I used small 250# casters on the forks. There are 8 of them. So under each fork on the front, there are 2 castors. That part also uses a metal 'L' for strenght. On the back side, I have two 2x4's and the frame for the forks is above them (not sitting on the 2x4s). This lets me pull on the forks without worrying about them sliding off. The forks weight 400#. I then have 1/2" plywood that can get beat-up without damaging the dolly, the last shot shows a topside view of this. There is also a sacrificial sheet of plywood under the bucket. You can see where I could have made that dolly 6" shorter, but, I wanted it so that the alignment was not too critical.

Next shot is another "floors eye view" showing the height differences and the casters close up. The castors on the bucket are 500# ones. On the right is the castor for the future plow dolly. It's a 650# one. It's tight with forks under the bucket (due to the plywood for the forks), but, putting the forks under the plow will have lots of clearance.
You can also see the multiple castors under the forks, and 'L' piece of metal for strength. When the forks go down, the front of the dolly gets the shock.

Last pix is a topside view of the forks dolly. It's fuzzy, sorry, was holding the camera up in the air. You can see the metal front edge, the 1st piece of plywood on the rear, and the 2nd pressure treated plywood strips where the forks land.

So there you dang go.

Pete
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,027 Posts
How many times do you contract out welding before you buy one...?? :flag_of_truce:


Pete
I always wanted a welder so I bought one, and I only contracted one job out to an acquaintance's son to do before I got my welder. It's so nice to have the flexibility to do projects and repairs on your schedule without hauling stuff to the fab shop or scheduling time with a buddy to get something done.

Now if I only had a place for a lathe and a mill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
I always wanted a welder so I bought one, and I only contracted one job out to an acquaintance's son to do before I got my welder. It's so nice to have the flexibility to do projects and repairs on your schedule without hauling stuff to the fab shop or scheduling time with a buddy to get something done.

Now if I only had a place for a lathe and a mill.
mjncad, I don't want to hijack the thread but I did have one question for you. Did you know how to weld before you bought your welder? I am just curious since I have never welded before and have toyed with the idea. I can see why Pete is doing what he is doing without a welder.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,027 Posts
Rob:

Prior to buying my welder within the last few years; my only other welding experience was in Junior High metal shop maybe 35-years ago using O/A and a Lincoln buzz-box. I tend to be self-taught on most things I do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,252 Posts
Rob. A mig welder is very easy to learn. I taught my 9 yr old neighbors boy to run a bead fairly quickly. He was too young to understand how to set up the machine. Good thing is miller has auto set feature now that gets you close for 99% of jobs Basically a no brainer. If you we're close. I could have you welding in an afternoon. It takes practice to put down a pretty weld with great penetration. But even the welds I layed when first starting out are still holding 10 yrs later
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
mjncad and rgd, thanks for the input. I remember using a acetylene torch and brasing in metal shop in high school. With practice I got pretty good. We never used the welder in the class I was in. It sounds like getting a good welder would allow you to do a lot of things and that it would not be too hard to learn in time. Thanks for the input. I guess I need to look through the welding section to find out what there is to know about mig welders and everything that would be needed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,027 Posts
You're welcome Rob. I forgot to mention I have a Miller 210 MIG with the optional spoolgun for aluminum welding. All I can suggest is stick to Miller, Lincoln, or Hobart welders. Miller and Hobart are owned by ITW (Illinois Tool Works) and from what I can see, current Hobart's are usually Miller's previous model machines with a few less niceties and lower cost components here and there. You can get parts and service for the big name brands, while the cheap ChiCom welders are probably like ChiCom tractors where you are on your own when it comes to parts and service if they need it.

I hated stick welding in Junior High because striking and maintaining an arc was a pain, plus auto-darkening helmets hadn't been invented yet.

I'd say get a good 220-VAC powered MIG and a good auto-darkening helmet. The auto helmets are the best thing that's happened to welding in my opinion, especially for hacks like me.


I bought the welder and tanks locally; but I got the spoolgun and some other accessories from www.cyberweld.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
mjncad, thanks for the input. We will see how my time runs in the new year for something like this.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
The dolly for the snow plow is done, here are some pix. Some are a little fuzzy due to high camera angle, sorry.

1st pix is the dolly before adding the protective/sacrificial plywood. The dolly has 2 coats of polyurethane so oil, water, and dirt will come off and not affect the wood. The stain is just for grins, a little pride in the project, 5 min. time hit.

2nd pix is a side shot, showing how high the dolly is. There is a 2x10 Southern Yellow Pine on the long side, and a 2x8 SYP on the short end, with 2x8 SYP on the edges and up the center. The plywood is a 11/16". There are PT 2x4 on the top at each end. This lets you pull the plow on the dolly without having the problem that if the dolly wheel snagged on something that the plow could slide off. The forks dolly had a similar "don't let this bad boy slide off" 2x4. The big wheels make this easy to move around. These are 750# castors, plow weights about 450#, lots of overkill but I wanted the height. I sand the area where the plywood meets the supporting boards and then route off 1/4" on all sides so that the finish is smooth, little chance of splinters, and more of that pride stuff.

3rd pix is dolly after some 1/2" PT plywood was added where the plow will land on the dolly. The plywood is held in with a few screws. That way, if you land the plow too hard or wear down the plywood, it's easy to change it out. It ugly's it up but that's OK because function has to win out over looks.

4th pix is the plow on the tractor. The dolly has it's odd, non-square shape because of how the plow is shaped. This makes the dolly easier to move around inside than if it was rectangular.

5th shot shows the forks dolly with the forks tucked underneath the plow dolly. Two implements stored in the space of one! As shown earlier, the forks also can fit under the bucket dolly, but not entirely like they do here.

When I get the plow off some day, I'll update this thread with a final picture. So far this winter we've had an inch of something, and yesterday was 1/4" of ice. I'm too ready for Mother Nature to let it snow I guess. :mocking:

Pete
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: WhiskeySixRadio

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,969 Posts
Looking good Pete. :thumbup1gif: I like how you pay attention to detail.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top