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This picture was posted on another site(s) by, which I'm sure, is a member here. I hope he don't mind me posting this picture. But, I just ran across this myself Friday. My '89 316 had weird off-set rims on the back that I could only get them mounted in the "wide" position. The offset was almost 90 to 95% to one side making it impossible to mount in the "narrow" position. A friend of mine gave me his standard rims and tires (23 x 10.50 x 12) and so I took both sets to the tire shop to switch over. When the free tires came off the rim, one tire had the green slime in it and the inside of the rim was a mess and starting to corrode. Bottom line, if you have a flat, get it fix or at least put in a tube. Don't use the green slime stuff.
 

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You know T-Mo I use slime and pretty much have to as the north part of my land has thorny locust trees. I run it in my tractor and my 5' x 10' utility trailer.

My last tractor had it in the turf tires and I switched to HDAPs and when the tire store removed the tires the rims literally looked brand new. I ran a nail through the sidewall on my trailer last fall and I was worried about it being road worthy even though the slimed sealed it so I replaced it. Once again the rim looked like new.

I have seen Calcium do what your picture shows but in my experience slime doesnt do that.

Wonder if there is a difference in slime brands or it needs to be in there really long term?

I dont know. Just throwing it out there. I could buy new rims every year for what slime saves me in flats !
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have read similar stories about the green slime corroding rims. And maybe it is brand specific, but I'm not sure. I can tell you that the ones I've seen Friday had the rims starting to corrode and there was a green and goo all over the place. Not pretty at all.

If you use any kind of liquid for weight, it's best to use tubes to protect the rims, I would think. Myself, I try to use other means for weight, like wheel weights or suitcase weights. And after seeing the picture above, reading other stories of corrosion and seeing it first hand Friday, myself, I will shy away from the stuff. Just my thoughts. Others may have a different experience.
 

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Yea I agree. I prefer other weight.

As I said its a no brainer for me. Its either that or having a flat tire all the time !

So far no issues. The first stuff I used that looked good was off brand stuff from tractor supply. The stuff I have in there now is actual green slime brand. So lets hope I dont have issues ! If I do my only option is buying new rims and putting slime back in them :)
 

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Too late for me

I had a slow leak in one of my front tires. 1989 JD 285. So in went the green slime. I hope to upgrade before the wheel rusts away
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Maybe it's time to go with steel tires like the older tractors had.:laugh:

I guess in some instances like yours, there isn't many options.
 

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Maybe it's time to go with steel tires like the older tractors had.:laugh:

I guess in some instances like yours, there isn't many options.
Can aerate at the same time if I get the spike kind:yahoo:
 

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Looks like that rim is old enough where it could easily have started corroding before slime was ever put in it.

I've used slime in lots of mower and atv tires over the years and never seen a problem.

I'm not gonna quit using a great product because of a maybe problem.



Personal experience has been excellent for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Per their website, there are rust and corrosion inhibitors in the green slime. But, they also recommend changing out the slime every two years due to the slime drying out. It sounds like that the inhibitors may break down and that's where the damage may occur. Also, the problems with corroding rims may lie with the other stuff, Fix-a-Flat. Maybe I should have title this thread: "Avoid using quick fix products in your tires!"
 

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I've used the green slime in my LT 155 mower tires. As luck would have it, I had a flat the first few months I had the mower and put green slime in to get me by until I could do better. 16 years later I'm still getting by and have quit worrying about doing better. YMMV but I've had good luck with the slime.
 

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When I bought my JD, 83-420, it had used golf cart tires on the front. One kept going flat, so I took it off & found the rim badly corroded. Since I didn't put the sealant in, I don't know what brand it was, but it eat a "pencil lead" sized hole in the rim! I cleaned it, epoxied the worst areas, re-painted the rim & installed tubes with the new V61 tires. ~~ Lowell
 

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