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OP, my town/state just finished a 3 year project in front of my house. Hold their feet to the fire and if you see something wrong have them fix it now, not after the job is done. All of the property owners where I live whose property was taken or used were compensated prior to construction. My slice was 10' x 250' of my frontage. They performed tree removal, all new loam for my front 1/2 acre, new trees, new mailbox, and hydro seed after I was done spreading the loam that they brought in and paid for. When I ran out of 6" cover I had them bring more. The payment to me for the land alone was $50K, and in return the contractors were given a place to park equipment, prep stone etc.. I made out very well on this project, but so should you.






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Discussion Starter #102
Good info, thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #103
Now they cut a trench in the road to take the water from the site. I think they're realizing how big a job this is hahaha.

 

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Excellent !!
 

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Discussion Starter #105
I'm not sure what they're up to now. A lot of toiling, now they bridged the trench they made before, and there's a wood frame in the water. They're trying to pump water around the road. Since this is the green forum, figured I'd get my tractor in one of these videos. :D

 

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Going out on a limb here and wondering if that wooden structure isn't a form for a toe wall to support the end of the pipe? In these parts, we put toe walls under our concrete box culverts, which we use for anything bigger than a corrugated plastic pipe (which is anything above 48", I believe). We don't use the concrete pipe, in fact a lot of our maintenance is replacing the ones set 30ish years ago because the sections are separating. We use the concrete box culverts and each section of box is fastened to the next.
 

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Going out on a limb here and wondering if that wooden structure isn't a form for a toe wall to support the end of the pipe? In these parts, we put toe walls under our concrete box culverts, which we use for anything bigger than a corrugated plastic pipe (which is anything above 48", I believe). We don't use the concrete pipe, in fact a lot of our maintenance is replacing the ones set 30ish years ago because the sections are separating. We use the concrete box culverts and each section of box is fastened to the next.
Same here - all box culverts now. It makes sense as the flat bottoms sections have much less chance of settling compared to the round sections.

justinhemi isn’t that far from me but in a different PennDOT district. I am also surprised to see the round concrete sections.
 

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I am also surprised to see the round concrete sections.
I'm glad you said that, as I kept my mouth shut when I saw that original pic of the pipe sections. But, I know things vary greatly by region. I will say that when out inspecting culverts last fall, I drove the Econoline van into an obscured hole in the shoulder. I was lucky to be able to drive out of it as the amount of material lost from the shoulder through the separated section is unbelievable. It was the same on both sides of the road. Luckily the road surface is still ok, but concrete pipe is scheduled to be replaced. This particular one was installed as a cattle pass in the 80s, it's about 6' in diameter. It sees no cattle as the farm land has been sold off to different owners, and very little flow, so it will be replaced with a small CPP.
 

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I'm glad you said that, as I kept my mouth shut when I saw that original pic of the pipe sections. But, I know things vary greatly by region. I will say that when out inspecting culverts last fall, I drove the Econoline van into an obscured hole in the shoulder. I was lucky to be able to drive out of it as the amount of material lost from the shoulder through the separated section is unbelievable. It was the same on both sides of the road. Luckily the road surface is still ok, but concrete pipe is scheduled to be replaced. This particular one was installed as a cattle pass in the 80s, it's about 6' in diameter. It sees no cattle as the farm land has been sold off to different owners, and very little flow, so it will be replaced with a small CPP.
Plenty of evidence around here also. Even on the pavement away from the shoulder - you would see a round hole a out 3/4” - 1” diameter - which is the telltale sign of a separation starting to erode underneath.
 

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Discussion Starter #110
Great info thanks gents!
 
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Discussion Starter #111
Spoke to the foreman today, he complained about the "new engineers" disagreeing on what to do haha. Anyway, their plan sounds good to me.

One thing is that where I've shown mother nature making her own path, instead of fighting it, they're going to make it part of the engineered solution.
 
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