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Has anyone come up with a good way to drain and flush the coolant on your 1025r without making a big mess?

Thanks!
 

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I learned a trick on a snowmobile forum that worked remarkably well on my liquid-cooled snowmobile when I needed to rebuild the water pump....

Shop Vac. Pulled one of the larger hoses off and put the hose of a 5 gallon wet/dry vac onto it, sucked all of the antifreeze right out, you could feel the air sucking into the cylinder head. I've never tried it on a tractor, but it really worked on a snowmobile.
 

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I have a pretty big pan for when I drain the hydro. I did this yesterday. Placed Pan underneath the front, opened the radiator pet cock and drained it. Looked underneath and shifted the pan a bit. Installed petcock and fluid. Same for block plug. Hosed rig down and that was the end of it. No mess at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have a pretty big pan for when I drain the hydro. I did this yesterday. Placed Pan underneath the front, opened the radiator pet cock and drained it. Looked underneath and shifted the pan a bit. Installed petcock and fluid. Same for block plug. Hosed rig down and that was the end of it. No mess at all.
I guess it's the hosing part that I find to be a mess.

I was even using two drain pans and still felt too much ended up on the floor of the garage.
 

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I guess it's the hosing part that I find to be a mess.

I was even using two drain pans and still felt too much ended up on the floor of the garage.
The same here. It is not the draining, it is the flushing that makes the mess. I always try to do mine in the summer, so I can just push it outside to do the flush and back flush.

I was smart when I built the new home with the 28 x 70 attached garage/workshop. I installed a trough style grated floor drain that runs the entire length of the shop about 2' in from the overhead doors. The other side is graded towards it the entire 25'. So at least the flush water flows to the drain and it is easy to squeegee off. None the less, we do attempt to collect and properly dispose of as much of the used anti-freeze as possible.

When I was a boy, my father had a friend that owned an automatic transmission shop. The owner took a bit of a shine to me, an allowed me to work on my snowmobile in his shop, after hours. I learned very quickly how to work without making a mess because if there was one thing out of place in that shop the next morning or evidence of a spill on the floor, I was in for verbal chewing out of no equal. As I became a teenager and had the muscle cars (I still have my high school car, '70 Charger R/T w/440-6pk), the amount of after hours activities in his shop reached epic proportions. To this day, I strive to maintain a tidy work environment.
 

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The port on the side of the engine is the problem. Draining the radiator is pretty easy to do without the mess.

I tried putting a funnel with a long hose in front of the side port. But the plug fell into the narrow part of the funnel and it filled up. I put absorbent pet pads all around underneath. Then the wind picked up.

I'm not convinced it can be done without some mess. No matter how much I plan to avoid mess on this job, I still get some. I did find a great absorbent that really helps in the cleanup. SEE THIS LINK.
 
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The port on the side of the engine is the problem. Draining the radiator is pretty easy to do without the mess.

I tried putting a funnel with a long hose in front of the side port. But the plug fell into the narrow part of the funnel and it filled up. I put absorbent pet pads all around underneath. Then the wind picked up.

I'm not convinced it can be done without some mess. No matter how much I plan to avoid mess on this job, I still get some. I did find a great absorbent that really helps in the cleanup. SEE THIS LINK.
I put that large pan on underneath the side and removed the plug after draining from the radiator petcock. It ran down into the pan. I than wiped down the side and wiped down the area near the radiator petcock. After refilling, pulled tractor out of shop a gave a rinse to front are and side with hose. Very very little had to be washed off. I didn't flush beacause my machine is only a year old. I changed coolant because of I topped it off with"any 50/50" based on dealers advice. So making a mess and polluting the environment was not an issue.

I thought about getting a fitting that goes from petcock thread to hose and block drain plug to hose for flushing. It was so easy, I will probably change coolant once a year and never have to flush.
 
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Go to the dollar store and buy one of those blue kiddie pools. Saw some for 5$ recently. They sell a 40" and a 72".
Raise the front end with the Fel. Slide the pool under the wheels or straddle with the 40". Lower. Flush away!
Screw it to the garage ceiling so the grandkids can't use it.

11092557-large.png
 

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This thread is a little old but seems those who have replied to the thread have done coolant change on a 1025r. My question is how do I do it? I know where the radiator drain (petcock) is, but it seems I need to remove the battery and the tray it sits on in order to drain the valve. Then there's the block drain plug. Where the heck is it? I have the block heater in my 1025r so I hope that I don't have to remove it, which seems like a bad idea to me. Just asking for a leak.

My 1025r is five years old this month and I've never changed the coolant. I've had to top off the coolant reservior when I got my tractor because it was a bit low so I have the jug of John Deere Coolguard ready to go. Just can't figure out what I need to remove to be able to drain the radiator.
 

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You don't have to remove anything to drain the radiator. The petcock should have a hose attached that is routed through the battery tray/pan and above the axle on the right side. When I did mine, it still leaked onto the battery tray some though.

The block plug is below the block heater (next to a switch if I recall). I think it takes a 15mm socket. I posted pictures in another thread....I'll have to find it.
 

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Here you go. Excerpts from the Service manual on installing the block heater.
 

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I’m going to have to do some looking. Don’t remember seeing that plug but my stupid flashlight wouldn’t work so must have missed it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Black painted plug in a black painted block. Don't know why you missed it. :laugh:
 

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How much old coolant is left behind if I only drain the radiator but don’t remove the plug from the engine block? I’m wondering if this shortcut change every 2 years (about 150 hours/year) would keep the cooling system in good health.
 

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How much old coolant is left behind if I only drain the radiator but don’t remove the plug from the engine block? I’m wondering if this shortcut change every 2 years (about 150 hours/year) would keep the cooling system in good health.
I have a 7-year old Gen-1 2-series and on my tractor the block plug is never coming out. I tried once because I was going to install a block heater but gave up after it laughed at my impact wrench and broke my beaker bar.

Soooo... I change my coolant every 2-years even though the new CoolGard is rated for 6-years. I do not bother with a block flush as each time I have changed it the fluid is as clean and clear as the new stuff I am putting in.

I would say if you feel you must flush it, drain the coolant and fill it back up with distilled water, run the tractor to warm the engine and then drain it again. Then fill back up with new coolant.

If you have low annual usage and change your coolant every 2-years you are less likely to build up any kind of deposits in the engine.
 

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How much old coolant is left behind if I only drain the radiator but don’t remove the plug from the engine block? I’m wondering if this shortcut change every 2 years (about 150 hours/year) would keep the cooling system in good health.
You're better than half way through the job and have the mess. So you might just as well do the whole job. The flush is to remove minerals contained in the mix water (why they recommend distilled water) and other contaminants that collect in the cooling system. We've come along way with antifreeze and cooling systems in the last 50 years. I can still vividly remember having radiators "rodded out" where they removed the upper/lower tank cover and worked a rod down each tube to clear the built up contaminants that were plugging/restricting the flow and heat dissipation.

I do mine when the weather is nice, so I can just roll it out in the driveway, once drained, and perform the flush/back flush with the garden hose.
 
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You're better than half way through the job and have the mess. So you might just as well do the whole job. The flush is to remove minerals contained in the mix water (why they recommend distilled water) and other contaminants that collect in the cooling system. We've come along way with antifreeze and cooling systems in the last 50 years. I can still vividly remember having radiators "rodded out" where they removed the upper/lower tank cover and worked a rod down each tube to clear the built up contaminants that were plugging/restricting the flow and heat dissipation.

I do mine when the weather is nice, so I can just roll it out in the driveway, once drained, and perform the flush/back flush with the garden hose.

Yup, flush it all out with the hose, drain it well, flush it with distilled, drain it, put 50% of capacity pure (not pre mix) anti-freeze in, then continue to top off with distilled water until at proper fill point.
 
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Permanent Waterless Coolant (Evans)

I'll just chime in about Evans Waterless coolant which is a "permanent" coolant with a lot of good features. There are a couple of GTT'ers, including me, that have changed to Evans. There is a process to remove all remaining water in your system, and it is quite a bit more expensive than any ethylene-glycol based coolant. But heck, if Jay Leno endorses it, it's probably a good product :lolol:

I changed mine to Evans in conjunction with adding a block heater (which I haven't had to us once yet :laugh:) and the 180* thermostat "upgrade".

In any case since many are cleaning out your cooling system and many are complaining about the mess, bother, etc. Why not do it once and forget it?

We have a thread:

https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/tractor-equipment-maintenance/16903-evans-waterless-coolant.html

and if you do a search on Evans coolant on GTT a few other threads pop up.

My guess is that the water in the ethylene-glycol mix causes a lot of issues with the dis-similar metals in an engine cooling system (galvanic corrosion, etc.) and having a "waterless" coolant mitigates a lot of those bad things (hence the recommendation of using distilled water.

Just my 2 cents.
 
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