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So here is the photo of my new 1025r sitting at the dealer since I bought it back in November. I will finally be taking delivery of it this Thursday. The delay was because I was waiting for my new house to be completed.
My question is this: I have heard that some people don't like drilling holes in their loader buckets to install hooks and such because it can weaken the bucket. I also included a photo here of a hook and clevis combo from Ken's bolt on hooks. I am thinking about putting the clevis on the inside of the bucket and the hook on the outside. I noticed in the photo that my bucket already has 2 holes but they are closer together. Are they too close for these hooks do you think? I realize the if I use those existing holes I would have to drill 2 more holes. If I decide to mount the hooks wider toward the sides of the bucket I would be drilling 4 more holes.
If drilling the holes weakens the bucket that much I do have a welding shop close to me that could weld the hooks on.
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IMO, the idea that drilling a few holes in a bucket to mount hooks somehow weakens the bucket is dubious. Even if there is some sort of measurable decrease in strength, the top plate is probably the least stressed part of the bucket anyway. And then you're clamping those holes between two pieces of steel that are thicker than the top plate around the holes is to begin with. If you drill holes and mount those hooks and the top plate is going to bend, it's going to bend around the plates on the hooks.

Now, that said, USING the hooks to lift something heavy might very well bend your bucket. But that doesn't haven't anything to do with holes. It has to do with lifting something heavy.

IMO, mounting the hooks directly in front of the factory hooks where the bucket attaches to the loader arms is probably the best location to avoid bending the bucket.
 

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I'm sure Ken will respond, but I put the same hook/clevis combo on my loader bucket (1023E) and it's occasionally very useful...certainly cost-efficient. I followed Ken's directions on mounted the two combo's on the top edge in line with the loader arms. Drilling holes for those hooks will have about zero effect on the integrity of the bucket. Your little tractor doesn't have near enough lifting power to damage itself with something on the hooks...it will just stop lifting before it will bend the bucket.

 

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Those existing holes are there for shipping purposes and no, you won't weaken the bucket by drilling holes for mounting Ken's hooks. Mount them pretty much anywhere you'd like.
 

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Your not going to hurt the bucket by drilling holes for those hooks and using the other side as a backing plate or a flat plate. I have had those hooks on my 1026r, 2032r and now my 3046r. I have lifted from the edge of the bucket on the 1 series to a point it would not pick up and went into bypass. Never tweaked he bucket or the arms. I am sure if you do really crazy things with it then you will bend it. But for the average owner you will not hurt the bucket.
 

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If you have concerns about bending the bucket when lifting something with the hooks, three things you can do to minimize the possibility.
1- mount the hooks at or near where the bucket attaches to the loader, around 10-12" in from each side.
2- add a flat plate inside the top lip of the loader, underneath the surface where the hooks are mounted. I used a piece of 3/16" thick by 3" wide piece of steel that ran the width of the bucket (side to side), bolted in 8 points, including the bolts that held the hooks in place. That will significantly stiffen the top of the bucket and distribute a load from the hooks. It may be overkill, what you'd be able to lift with the hooks might not be enough to bend the top anyway.
3-When lifting something using the hooks, tip the bucket down (dump) as far as it will go, which puts the hooks vertical as well as the plate they are mounted to.
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Keep in mind it’s a 1025r. While technically I guess it can make the bucket weaker with holes drilled it all comes back to what it is and how much power & force is behind it. Just install the hardware as per Ken’s videos and you’ll never tear up that bucket. The hooks & eyes are so handy.
 

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Sounds like you're going to add the exact setup I have. Good choice (y)
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If I had it to do over again I wouldn't have painted, but I have no other regrets. I mounted close to the loader arm attachment point to minimize any flexing of the bucket with a load on the hooks or clevis, but with two plates thicker than the bucket material firmly bolted over top of the holes I drilled I really don't think the bucket will be weakened. Besides, if Deere had no problem drilling holes just to secure the bucket while shipping, they can't do too much harm.
 

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I always laugh when I hear this...I swear the guys that suggest that the bucket will get weakened are sitting in their Mamma's basement in their underwear making sun wild claims...it's utterly ridiculous. Look at the videos we have on the Proof Testing page at the website if you want to see how tough 10 gauge plate is.
 

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If you have concerns about bending the bucket when lifting something with the hooks, three things you can do to minimize the possibility.
1- mount the hooks at or near where the bucket attaches to the loader, around 10-12" in from each side.

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I always understood it was recommended to mount the hooks in line with where the bucket attachment hooks are welded on.

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I always understood it was recommended to mount the hooks in line with where the bucket attachment hooks are welded on.

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Maybe that's the strongest place, but I see little difference placing them within a few inches either way. I wanted mine a bit closer together than the bucket mounts, and they're still close enough that the bucket is highly unlikely to bend or buckle from whatever I'm able to pick up. My bucket's top lip is slightly bent (that way when I got it), looks like it was used to push something, which I think is more likely to bend it than lifting something with hooks attached.
 

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Technically, you are weakening the bucket however as a practical matter, well it doesn't matter because unless you do something ridiculous you will never know what the failure point is.

Now if you want to hook a chain to one of Ken's hooks and the other end to a large tree and then get a running start backing up, you might screw up the bucket. More than likely you will also kill yourself, and or tear up the loader.

If you do want to find out for sure if you weakened the bucket, please have someone video it. The video might pay for a funeral or hospital expenses, lol.

On a less absurd note, purely lifting won't cause any problems but using the tractor to jerk a chain certainly can. That's not a knock on Kenny's hooks, drilling holes in the bucket or the backing plate but just a comment on the power of a controlled lift vs. the impact of a heavy machine coming to a slam bam stop.

Treefarmer
 

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Ken,

You should put a video on your website with your "puppy", Skylar and her little "tug rope" which we sent her at Christmas; You could hook her tug of war rope to the KBO hooks on the tractor bucket, to show just how tough the KBO Hooks AND the bucket really are. While I would expect Skylar to be able to drag the tractor around with her tow rope, hopefully she would avoid tipping the tractor over in the process.

I have used my KBO hooks to do all sorts of things and if I had to do it over, I would put the clevis plates on the inside of the bucket underneath the hooks (just as Amazon Hunter is considering) to make their usefulness even greater.

?:)? Amazon Hunter should also add to his tractor;

the 1 series step

and the Differential Pedal extension

and the seat springs

and the I Match chain boxes (full set with lids and grips)

and the Loader Grab Handle

and the Ken's High Optic Tee Shirt, in fact, I would recommend he order a dozen of the shirts.

This should get him started................
 

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I agree drilled holes are fine. So is wlding. I welded mine on but really only because I had my welder out for another project. Kept them inline with the loader arms out of habbit more than anything. On the Case 580 backhoes we would weld hooks inside the bucket inline with the loader arms. On the big ass CAT 988 Loader we welded a hook to the middle of the inside of the bucket about 2/3 way up from the bottom (Lots of preheat on that one). That way when a chain snaped the bucket protected the operator. Our little tractors we probably cant’t snap a chain....well I never tried kids swing set chain lol

Fun fact I think those holes drilled in the bucket is how the loader gets palletized from JD. Saw some at the dealership last spring. Some all-thread goes through some where and holds the bucket sideways to a loader arm. Seems odd but must make sense for shiping optimization? You would think plastic banding would be easier and cheaper?
 

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I wonder if those holes could also be used during the paint process.
 

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The existing holes in the bucket is for shipping purposes.
Correct, but only on the FILB (factory installed loader/backhoe) models. If the dealer orders a loader by itself the bucket comes without the holes.
 
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