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My gravel driveway has apparently gotten wider over time. It is now up to 16 feet wide in some places. What should be grass sloping away from the driveway is driveway. So this weekend I dug up the side of the driveway to bring it back where it belongs. Now I want to do something to edge the entire length of the driveway to keep it all pretty and contained. Way too much driveway for railroad ties, landscape timbers, or 6x6s. So I think what I want to use is steel edging. It will flexible enough to shape properly, and strong enough to not fall apart in a week. The best I can find looks like this: https://www.homedepot.com/p/COL-MET-8-ft-Brown-Steel-Landscape-Edging-814B/100137006

I figure I can hammer it a bit into the base layer. That and stakes should be pretty solid. I will backfill topsoil up to it on the lawn side, and crusher run on the driveway side. I don't want a lot sticking up, just enough to keep it separated.

Any suggestions or other ideas?

 

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Driveway looks great now I have zero experience with steel edging, can’t help you there, but that driveway looks great.


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Installing any kind of edging like that will end up a disaster. It will hold water not alowing it to drain and will just get dug up with snow plows.

I've never seen edging of any sort used on gravel roads - been working on them at the state and township level for many years.

A gravel road takes maintenance - plain and simple. Each spring it needs to be graded. You run the grader - or in our cases our tractors with an angled rear blade - and pull the edges back in and recreate the proper crown.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ok, but this is a 12ft wide 150ft long driveway, not a county highway 😁.

Without some form of hard edge, what do you suggest to keep the lawn and driveway separated?
 

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I'd suggest some topsoil along the edge area you worked and some good grass-seed.
 

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I'd suggest some topsoil along the edge area you worked and some good grass-seed.
This right here ^^^^^^^ it’s a pain every spring to clean up from plowing, but it’s a necessary evil. I have a few spots I reseed every year.


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I've done a lot of steel edging for gardens and to separate grass from rock. The ground will have fun heaving your edging. However you had it situated in the fall, by spring it will look entirely different. It will also push up the pins that you use to hold it in place. I use a sledgehammer vertically to pound them all back in every spring. With a driveway that long, you'll get tired of that sledgehammer.

I've found that I have to overlap the edging by a few inches and secure the joint to keep it stable. I drill a couple of holes through both pieces where they join and put a couple of galvanized bolts through them. If I don't, they won't stay aligned and you'll have a sharp corner sticking up at every joint. Drilling this many joints for a long driveway will make you insane. The steel is not easy to drill through. I would avoid steel edging.

Other ideas: Pavers might not cost much more than edging, and might even be easier to install. They need to be flush or you'll be hitting them with the snowblower/plow blade. Several of my neighbors have put in these continuous pour concrete separators around landscape features on their property. They sure look nice. They should be a lot cheaper than a concrete driveway, but probably still expensive.
 

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:dunno:what would be wrong with sloping the grass side too. then sow grass to that. that way u wouldn't have such a drop off at the yard side. that would save ya the time and money of edging-and i agree the frost is gonna heave it each yr, and i bet u would hit the edging mowing-at least that would be my luck. just my 2cts. i wished i knew how to use my putal to draw it out on ur pic. might explain it easier than of what i'm trying to say.:banghead:
 

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Installing any kind of edging like that will end up a disaster. It will hold water not alowing it to drain and will just get dug up with snow plows.

I've never seen edging of any sort used on gravel roads - been working on them at the state and township level for many years.

A gravel road takes maintenance - plain and simple. Each spring it needs to be graded. You run the grader - or in our cases our tractors with an angled rear blade - and pull the edges back in and recreate the proper crown.


I'd suggest some topsoil along the edge area you worked and some good grass-seed.
This right here ^^^^^^^ it’s a pain every spring to clean up from plowing, but it’s a necessary evil. I have a few spots I reseed every year.


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I agree completely. I think the edging will become a full time job. If you get a good stand of grass going and keep it graded back to center and crowned it will work well. As Pat says there will still be areas you have to reseed from damage getting it back to center. I love the look of the driveway but can’t tell from the photo, Does it have enough fines or clay to keep it compacted? It just looks loose.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I guess where I'm having trouble working out edging it without a barrier is that the driveway is higher than the lawn to begin with. I would need to cut the driveway itself down below the level of the soil so the stone fills it in I guess?

...but can’t tell from the photo, Does it have enough fines or clay to keep it compacted? It just looks loose.
I had back bladed the top layer off to smooth it out and just put a thin layer back down before I took the picture. Just enough to drive on. There is a substantial packed layer of fines in there and plenty in the pile too. I probably need a box blade to really get it mixed up properly again. But I'm also considering having it paved over too.
 

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I agree completely. I think the edging will become a full time job. If you get a good stand of grass going and keep it graded back to center and crowned it will work well. As Pat says there will still be areas you have to reseed from damage getting it back to center. I love the look of the driveway but can’t tell from the photo, Does it have enough fines or clay to keep it compacted? It just looks loose.
This....

I’d never even attempt steel or aluminum edging on a driveway. The idea to have a barrier to separate the gravel from the lawn is nice to think about but unless it’s done with something much more stout and durable it would quickly degenerate into a maintenance nightmare involving far to much upkeep to be of any value.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So should I dig a small ditch along the edge of the driveway so the crusher run comes to the edge of the lawn level with the soil? I can't just have 3 inches of gravel laying on the ground next to the grass. Which is what I had before and it was a disaster.
 

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Me looking at the pic you posted, the right side looks higher than the left. I would guess the gravel is getting washed from the right to the left. If that is the case you need the ditch on the right side, but also have to think about where that water would run to.
 

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Me looking at the pic you posted, the right side looks higher than the left. I would guess the gravel is getting washed from the right to the left. If that is the case you need the ditch on the right side, but also have to think about where that water would run to.
The right side is higher. However I already made a ditch on that side between the lawn and driveway. So runoff from the lawn runs down the ditch on the right all the way to the bottom in the yard. It is quite the river in a heavy rain.

No runoff from the yard washes over the driveway.
 

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At this point, I'd probably just live with it. You did mention paving it. One of the nicest things we did to our place was asphalt the drive way. That was almost 20 years ago and we had it redone a couple of years ago. It expensive though, ours is about 600 feet long and we probably have about $25,000 to $30,000 in having it done twice.
 

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At this point, I'd probably just live with it. You did mention paving it. One of the nicest things we did to our place was asphalt the drive way. That was almost 20 years ago and we had it redone a couple of years ago. It expensive though, ours is about 600 feet long and we probably have about $25,000 to $30,000 in having it done twice.
Quote to pave the driveway is about $6,000. This is part of the reason for my narrowing it down. I'm not paying to pave a 16ft wide driveway when it only needs to be 12ft wide. Pavement would give me a solid surface to put topsoil up to and solve most of this problem I think.


Looks like a good place for a grassed waterway. It would just be part of the lawn.
It is currently stone. It's just the V formed by the crown of the driveway and downward slope of the lawn. I couldn't make it wider and grow grass without basically regrading the entire front of the property. I would rather it be grass, but it's just not practical given the geography.
 

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Ok, but this is a 12ft wide 150ft long driveway, not a county highway 😁.

Without some form of hard edge, what do you suggest to keep the lawn and driveway separated?

The solution to your issue is patience,,, Grasshopper,,,



The grass will grow into the driveway,,
given enough time,, you will be fighting the grass back off of the gravel.

THAT is when you have the opportunity to define the grass/gravel border,,
Roundup will be your friend,,, :bigthumb:
 
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