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Looking for some advice on hanging ceiling drywall in a big open garage. I can use an electric scissor lift for cheap/free. I am debating using the scissor lift instead of a true drywall lift (the scissor lift would lift the sheetrock). Does anyone have any thoughts on this? Am i better off just getting a drywall lift and using the scissor lift for lifting myself? What if I can only have one of the two, would the drywall lift work better? It is a 10' ceiling height. Do drywall lifts serve any purpose for the walls? Thanks in advance.
 

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Looking for some advice on hanging ceiling drywall in a big open garage. I can use an electric scissor lift for cheap/free. I am debating using the scissor lift instead of a true drywall lift (the scissor lift would lift the sheetrock). Does anyone have any thoughts on this? Am i better off just getting a drywall lift and using the scissor lift for lifting myself? What if I can only have one of the two, would the drywall lift work better? It is a 10' ceiling height. Do drywall lifts serve any purpose for the walls? Thanks in advance.
Drywall lifts are great. I have used for drywall and osb on ceilings and walls many times. It one of those things, you find other uses. I have even used to mount an attic stairway couple of times.
 

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I've never used a drywall lift because we were young and dumb. I have however done it with a scissor lift and it does work. Just be careful you don't go up too hard and fast and break the sheetrock...then you've got more to tape :banghead:

I also did an entire basement 25x40 once using just step ladders. That sucked. If I ever do sheetrock again I'll buy or rent a nice sheetrock lift.
 

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Swiver,

I would use the drywall lift over the scsissor lift for hanging sheetrock. You are better able to position the sheet where it needs to be with the drywall lift. You will have to work from step ladders to secure the sheets, but you will get the hang of that rather quickly. And yes, you can use it to hand sheets on the vertical wall surfaces as well.

Dave
 

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Yep! Drywall lift is the cat's meow for sure!:good2:
 

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Thanks everyone. That’s what I figured, but I am glad to have heard it from experienced individuals!
 

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It's going to be a whole lot easier to load the sheets on a drywall lift because it can get so much closer to the floor, load height is about 3 feet on my lift and the sheet table drops down to just short of vertical so you can just carry the sheet up and set it right on the lift and then lay it flat. I can load 8' sheets by myself but 12' it's a lot easier with a helper.

With a scissor lift you'd have to build a support above the lift platform to allow room for you to get on, raise it up and fasten the sheet. You would then have to get each sheet way up on top of that. On my skyjacker that would be 7-8 feet above the floor. I've installed liner panel that way and it works ok but that's a whole lot lighter than drywall. When you are doing this over and over with 12' sheets of drywall it's gonna suck. The drywall lift is really easy to control you can cinch the sheet right up against the ceiling and still be able to shift the position.

If it's a big area I'd vote for both, the scissor for you and the drywall lift for the rock. Couple years ago I hung eighty some 12' sheets on an 11-12' ceiling. Used my Telpro lift and an electric scissor lift, made it much easier. For eight foot ceiling I'd use a short step ladder, ten foot will require a lot of up and down, 12' will kick your butt after a long day of going up and down the ladder. Small room no problem with a ladder, 4000 sq foot is a whole different cat.

As a bonus you can use the drywall lift to lift the wall sheeting too, it saves a ton of work when you have tall ceilings.
 

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A drywall lift also tilts so there is some benefit to doing the side walls.

My recommendation is to watch Craig's list unless you are in a rush. Then sell it for what you bought it for.
 

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to me a Drywall lift makes it a 1-2man job vs 2-3man job via sissor lift ........and still have to lift sheets onto sissor lift and support
If you have 2 people you don't need a lift.
My Dad was a drywall contractor for many years.
Rocking crews were always just 2 guys.
I hung rock with the best of them when I was young.



2 experienced guys can rock a house faster without a lift.
I will admit its bull work, thats why I got out of it and worked with my brains instead of my back.

When I had my house built the rocking crew was 5 guys. No lift. They may get the house done quicker but they use more hours of labor to do it and the finished product is much inferior.
Taping and finishing crews were also large and they had to sand between coats.

I guess skill is a thing of the past in the building trades.
 

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Drywall lifts are great. I have used for drywall and osb on ceilings and walls many times. It one of those things, you find other uses. I have even used to mount an attic stairway couple of times.
I rented a drywall lift to hang a couple of ambient air cleaners just like this one in my basement shop.

 

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I agree with others!!! Drywall lift is the only way to go. I did my entire 34' x 32' garage with 10' high ceilings with OSB by myself with w drywall lift. I had a rolling scaffold also which can work although getting up and down off the scaffold can be a pain. About 1/2 way through the project, I found just using a step ladder was as easy.
 

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If you have 2 people you don't need a lift.
My Dad was a drywall contractor for many years.
Rocking crews were always just 2 guys.
I hung rock with the best of them when I was young.



2 experienced guys can rock a house faster without a lift.
I will admit its bull work, thats why I got out of it and worked with my brains instead of my back.

When I had my house built the rocking crew was 5 guys. No lift. They may get the house done quicker but they use more hours of labor to do it and the finished product is much inferior.
Taping and finishing crews were also large and they had to sand between coats.

I guess skill is a thing of the past in the building trades.

if i hire it done by "experienced" guys i could careless how they do it im paying by the sq/ft not by the hr.....if i am one man and rarely do drywall work by myself doing a ceiling im going to get a lift.....last job i hired done i had to learn to speak spanish every day but payday not many 2nd n 3rd gen drywallers around here anymore.....i have noticed when i am buying the materials and hiring the work the dumpster gets a lot fuller when the work is done and cleanup is twice the pain..
 

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plus 10,000,000,000% for a drywall lift. I bought this one at harbor freight and I have used it on my first shop to lift OSB panels as well as dry-walling a ceiling in our bedroom. All my buddies have used it and its so much easier to get the panels in just the right spot. Save your back and shoulders and just get one.

https://www.harborfreight.com/drywall-panel-hoist-69377.html

It will pay for itself really fast.
 

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You are going to find the drywall lift the best fit especially if you are going larger that 4 x 8's. Most lifts allow for extending the arms if you go with 12 or 16 footers. It also depends on whether you have help in this project. When we did our garage and basement, I felt I spent more time cutting around the lights and electrics outlets than I did actually hanging the sheets. The other option is and again depending on if your are doing this alone or with help, is to rent the lift from a local equipment rental place. I would think you could get that garage done easily in a weekend. And if not, you only have to secure it sheet until you come back later with the scissor lift or ladder to finish out the screws on each sheet. Pics of project are required. :bigthumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Awesome. Thanks everyone!!
 

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Drywall lifts work great, even harbor freight.

Scissor lifts would be great for this finish work as stated.

I hate mudding and I’m not good at it. It’s money well spent for professionals, even at minimum wage for myself the math says pay them, and find another way to make money for a couple hours.
 

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