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Has anyone added a battery to a 1025 or similar? I run some LED lights to work in the yard. I leave the tractor running when I would rather not to keep the battery from getting drained. I'm pulling around 70 watts (probably more) with everything on. I'd like to route my external lights to a deep-discharge battery and not wear on my tractor one. The lights are set up to just plug into the power outlet but I'd add a couple lights and a nicer switch if I add another battery. I could potentially run the lights for several hours.

Thanks, Tom
 

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I wouldn't worry about it or go to the trouble of adding a second battery. IF you have a problem and I don't think you will, you could think about replacing the original battery with a larger capacity or deep cycle unit.
 

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Has anyone added a battery to a 1025 or similar? I run some LED lights to work in the yard. I leave the tractor running when I would rather not to keep the battery from getting drained. I'm pulling around 70 watts (probably more) with everything on. I'd like to route my external lights to a deep-discharge battery and not wear on my tractor one. The lights are set up to just plug into the power outlet but I'd add a couple lights and a nicer switch if I add another battery. I could potentially run the lights for several hours.

Thanks, Tom
I would think you would have two problems to deal with. Location and charging issues. The charging system on these tractors, while stout for the tractor, is not that large of capacity. I would check your LED lights and see exactly what amps you are pulling. Now days these LED lights at 70W is very little. Even if you are using standard lights at 70W you are pulling 5.833amps. Your system is more than capable of handling that.
 

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John Deere does offer a larger alternator for the 1 series for those running extra items, which it would seem might be necessary if you were to be charging dual 12 volt batteries, but the cost of the up charge is around $400 if I recall correctly. Being a diesel, I just let mine idle and with 2,600 hours on it, it is doing just fine. These small Yanmar's are so incredibly fuel efficient that even at operating RPM's, I only use about 1/2 gallon of fuel per hour or less.

I wouldn't worry about letting the tractor idle. With the cooling system and the way they are built, they can run all day and not be a problem. I find that once I start mine, I will idle it down and let it run even when I am off it doing something else for several minutes. I also agree that finding a place for the battery would be an issue.

I have run multiple batteries on numerous things including my boats, race cars, my 4x4's and motor coaches. But those were because of significant extra battery demand like for the winch, starting a 1,600hp high compression engine or extensive 12 volt systems with the power being converted to 110 for appliances, etc.

I agree with SGS's comment about either upgrading the battery or going to a Deep Cycle unit. Just be aware that the diesel vibration will damage the plate style batteries if they are not designed to accommodate the shaking, etc. I learned after a few battery replacements that the right battery application for these tractors needs to recognize their unique use environment with the vibration and other demands.

By the way, Welcome to the GTT forum.....
 

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... I would check your LED lights and see exactly what amps you are pulling. Now days these LED lights at 70W is very little. Even if you are using standard lights at 70W you are pulling 5.833amps. Your system is more than capable of handling that.
The LEDs are 27 watts a piece giving me about 5 AMPs. That's where the 12-volt power usually wants to stay under. Add the headlights and JD work lights and ... I don't know what those draw. They tend to get blocked by the loader so I usually turn them off.

I don't worry about hurting the tractor idling it - I just don't want to put on 1,000 hours while I'm running around the yard.

TF
 

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JD has a lighting kit option for these tractors, are the LED's you want to add in addition to those?

The only place I could think (without turning this into a design exercise) of adding an extra battery is up front. You would have to build a tray that mounts externally. You would have to make sure it clears the loader and doesn't get damaged since it is hanging off the front. You would have to hook it up in series so you maintain the 12volt system. One other possible place might be to mount it on the side of the seat/fender pan on one of the fenders but then the cables are liable to be an issue and you are sitting next to a battery, which if it explodes could put acid all over you.

I believe JD's standard alternator rating is 20 amps and then the upgraded one is 37, at least that is what my 2210 is like and it is two generations older than a 1 series so maybe the optional alternator puts out more power but I doubt it.

Like others have said, I do not think another battery is required. You might be better served getting an upgraded alternator to make up for the extra power draw.

However, if an extra battery is the way you want to go, a cheap home made solution, might be to mount a tray (like a Big Tool Rack) on the 3 point receiver hitch (assuming you have one) and placing the battery on it and then rigging to power your lights separate from the on board charging system. This will allow you to remove it when you do not need to use it and saves you the hassle of modifying your tractor extensively. The only kicker is you have to get your battery charged by a charger not the tractor.

I use something very similar to this when I want to mount my battery powered sprayer on my tractor because I can't afford a Big Tool Rack: Traveller Trailer Heavy-Duty Hitch Packer, 20 in. x 60 in. - For Life Out Here

It works well for what I use it for. A Big Tool Rack is a way better designed rack though.
 
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JD has a lighting kit option for these tractors, are the LED's you want to add in addition to those?

The only place I could think (without turning this into a design exercise) of adding an extra battery is up front. You would have to build a tray that mounts externally. You would have to make sure it clears the loader and doesn't get damaged since it is hanging off the front. You would have to hook it up in series so you maintain the 12volt system. One other possible place might be to mount it on the side of the seat/fender pan on one of the fenders but then the cables are liable to be an issue and you are sitting next to a battery, which if it explodes could put acid all over you.

I believe JD's standard alternator rating is 20 amps and then the upgraded one is 37, at least that is what my 2210 is like and it is two generations older than a 1 series so maybe the optional alternator puts out more power but I doubt it.

Like others have said, I do not think another battery is required. You might be better served getting an upgraded alternator to make up for the extra power draw.

However, if an extra battery is the way you want to go, a cheap home made solution, might be to mount a tray (like a Big Tool Rack) on the 3 point receiver hitch (assuming you have one) and placing the battery on it and then rigging to power your lights separate from the on board charging system. This will allow you to remove it when you do not need to use it and saves you the hassle of modifying your tractor extensively. The only kicker is you have to get your battery charged by a charger not the tractor.

I use something very similar to this when I want to mount my battery powered sprayer on my tractor because I can't afford a Big Tool Rack: Traveller Trailer Heavy-Duty Hitch Packer, 20 in. x 60 in. - For Life Out Here

It works well for what I use it for. A Big Tool Rack is a way better designed rack though.
If this is a 1 Series I believe my alternator is 40 amps.

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 
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Honestly, it would be easier to mount a small generator with battery charging capabilities FREE SHIPPING — Generac iX Series Portable Inverter Generator — 2200 Surge Watts, 2000 Rated Watts, 127cc OHV Engine, Model# 6719 | Inverter Generators| Northern Tool + Equipment on a 3 point carry all CountyLine Carry All - For Life Out Here or other rear mount device and simply connect the leads to the tractor battery to keep it charged rather than installing a second battery.
As others have said, there just isn't enough extra space on these tractors to install a second battery, make it look good and protected.

Not to mention you would have to parallel connect the deep cycle battery with the OEM battery so the alternator will charge both batteries when the engine is charging. Then, when the engine is not running, you would have to have a high amperage solenoid disconnect or manual battery disconnect to isolate the batteries from each other so the lights would not pull current from the deep cycle and tractor battery when used with the engine not running. If you do not disconnect the batteries from each other when using the lights without the engine running, both batteries will be drawn dead.

The size of the alternator on the tractor is 40 amp, maximum output. this alternator will charge both batteries, although, not quickly. And if you are using the tractor with the lights on, the batteries will be charged slower yet. Increasing the size of the alternator should not be done unless you also increase the size of the charging wire from the alternator.

Bottom line, adding another battery can cause you more trouble than what it is worth.
 

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An option you may want to look into is a RED TOP OPTIMA battery - Years ago when I worked in a Ford dealership and the cop cars had these because of the reserve capacity and the CCA. Problem is I think they can be pricey and not made directly for a tractor. You'd have to get the size and polarity you need.

Couple things to think about:

A tractor/Truck/car starting/ charging battery is designed to provide a large amount of current for a short period of time. This surge of current is needed to turn the engine over during starting.

A deep cycle battery is designed to provide a steady amount of current over a long period of time. A deep cycle battery can provide a surge when needed, but nothing like the surge a car battery can. So a true deep cycle wouldn't be real good for a normal starting battery.

A car battery typically has two ratings:

•CCA (Cold Cranking Amps) - The number of amps that the battery can produce.
•RC (Reserve Capacity) - The number of minutes that the battery can deliver 25 amps while keeping its voltage above 10.5 volts

Typically, a deep cycle battery will have two or three times the RC of a car battery, but will deliver one-half or three-quarters the CCAs. In addition, a deep cycle battery can withstand several hundred total discharge/recharge cycles, while a car battery is not designed to be totally discharged.
 
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You could always get a low voltage alarm that way you would get an audible warning before you get into trouble allowing you to start the tractor back up.
 

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The engine size and electrical system demands of these tractors are a fraction of a typical car, but with a similarly sized battery. If anything, I'd look for a high-end battery, but I'd never bother with a twin battery setup on a tractor this size.

They don't even a high-pressure electric fuel pump or ignition system to power...just a small fuel pump that primes the system and gets fuel to the injector pump, lights, and a rudimentary brain-box for the pto, safety switches, etc.
 
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