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I am ready to purchase a 3pt. post hole digger for my 1026r and have a silly question. I will be putting in 6" posts for my fence so do I purchase a 6" auger? I know this may sound stupid but do I need to purchase a larger auger to accommodate for leveling the post after it is put in the hole? Or is a 6" auger already over sized to accept a 6" post? Or is a 6" post undersized to go with a 6" auger? Help!
 

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A 6" auger will dig a hole very close to a 6" diameter. I think you would want a 9" auger for 6" posts.

I drilled my 6" posts with a 12" auger and I used more cement to fill the hole that I would have if I used a 9" auger, but I need the 12" auger to plant trees. It came dow tot he cost and storage of multiple size augers.
 

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I got the TSC digger and 9" auger for exactly that. It's actually pretty important to have a bit of space around the post since your holes will often not be perfectly vertical so the wiggle room is handy. Around here (clay), you only need to put concrete in for the gate posts, and possibly the corners (but most don't). Putting the clay back in and tamping with the back side of a breaker bar has made the posts impressively sturdy.

Maybe some other PHD is easier to use on the 1026R, but with mine I have to be really careful not to dig the auger in. I run at idle most the time, and only rev up when pulling out to clear the dirt (more than once a hole). I also put the bucket down and keep high pressure in the tires when using the PHD, trying to reduce the "spring" in the system. Until you develop a sense for when you are digging in, kill the PTO first before pulling up. In the beginning you will have been too slow and the PHD won't come right up, and the delay of trying to bring the PHD up with the 3pt control will only have allowed you to dig in further. You can move the tractor in/out an inch or so to help unstick the auger, but be careful not to go side to side and bend things you don't want bent. Lastly, a large pipe wrench with you helps back an auger out when you need to.

Good luck :)
 

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Also got 9" for 6 inch posts which did compensate for off perfectly vertical holes.

The comments re digging the auger in are very relevant. I did get a little aggressive on one hole and the 1026 didn't have enough - oooomph, to get it out. Pipe wrench and several manual turns later, it was free......Small bites and clearing regularly worked fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks so much everyone, very useful information that I will use. Now off to TSC to pick up a digger!
 

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A lot will also depend on the digging environment. Rocky ground may provide for rather large holes compared to the auger.
 
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Great advice above. Just one more note. If you're setting square posts, measure them diagonally. I had to use a 12" auger to set 6x6" square posts for a barn. A 9" was too small to pour concrete around the post.
Great point... Hadn't considered that at all, but the diagonal measurement of a 6x6 (5.5x5.5 nominal) would be just over 7.75". A 9" bore hole doesn't leave much room to set the post and plumb it, let alone fill around it with concrete!
 
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I just bought a TSC post hole digger and 9" auger tonight (still in the crate). The wife demanded the fence to allow letting the dogs out. I'm going to use 3.5" to 4" posts and 6"+ gate and corner posts. I'll just shovel clearance the larger post holes. I plan on concreting most holes after digging 24" deep. The corners and gates I'll go at least 36" deep. I've got to rig up a decent motor operated gate, so she can close it before letting the dogs out. I've got a wrap around driveway, so I have to cross the 12" concrete drive at some point. The new beagle-weiner has been a hand full. I'm initially going with a woven or diamond wire fence, but I may add a board top rail to dress it up later. I still have to determine post spacing and lay it out. I'll try to detail it somewhere on here. I built miles of four and three board faced wood fences for horse farms in high school. I also built some heavy wire fences on buffalo farms. Good times.
 

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I just bought a TSC post hole digger and 9" auger tonight (still in the crate). The wife demanded the fence to allow letting the dogs out. I'm going to use 3.5" to 4" posts and 6"+ gate and corner posts. I'll just shovel clearance the larger post holes. I plan on concreting most holes after digging 24" deep. The corners and gates I'll go at least 36" deep. I've got to rig up a decent motor operated gate, so she can close it before letting the dogs out. I've got a wrap around driveway, so I have to cross the 12" concrete drive at some point. The new beagle-weiner has been a hand full. I'm initially going with a woven or diamond wire fence, but I may add a board top rail to dress it up later. I still have to determine post spacing and lay it out. I'll try to detail it somewhere on here. I built miles of four and three board faced wood fences for horse farms in high school. I also built some heavy wire fences on buffalo farms. Good times.
wjfawb0, have u thought of trying the invisible dog fence? I put mine in over a yr ago, using my tractor's 3pt, worked wonderful. big jim--good luck with ur fence.
 
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I can second the invisible fence as an alternate. We have 2.8 acres and we installed 1200 feet of wire mostly 30 feet off the perimeter of the property and 50 of the back end. Works great.
 
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I dig a lot of holes with my jd 2210 I use a 6 inch auger for 4x4 posts in clay rocky soil For my type of soil i think i could not drill with more than a 6 inch auger The less soil you disturb the better the post with hold
I installed a LOT of posts in 1983 with a 10" auger,,, most of them are still a little loose,,,

I bought a 6" auger about 5 years ago,,, those posts were tight from day one,,,

I had to take the time to get the auger perfect,,, but,,,, it resulted in a MUCH better fence,,,
 

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I can second the invisible fence as an alternate. We have 2.8 acres and we installed 1200 feet of wire mostly 30 feet off the perimeter of the property and 50 of the back end. Works great.
X3. Had 6 acres fenced in for about 15 years. Now about 2 acres fenced in.
 
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I'm also a proponent for invisible fence. I have two German Short Haired Pointers - Bird dogs and they need to run. I trenched in just under 5000' of wire in a day, had about 3 people helping back fill with garden rakes. It took the new pup all of about 10 minutes to figure out the fence and where she can and can't be. The nice part of the system is you can add on to block off a garden or landscaping so that they aren't digging up the Mrs' Petunias or tearing up the mulch next to the front walk.

Fences make great neighbors when you don't have very good neighbors, but I still like the invisible fence system. No gates to leave open or maintain. No digging under the fence to escape. Peace of mind when I'm at work as they have a dog door in the garage to get out of the inclement weather and the freedom to run and play that they deserve.

I have a gravel drive, so I cut it with the trencher, then cleaned up the ditch with a mattock and laid a conduit for the wire so if I ever have a problem I do not have to open up the drive again. At my old home, I had a concrete drive, I opened up an existing joint with a masonry blade (gas powered demo saw or even a 4" angle grinder with a diamond blade would work good), laid the wire in the joint and used a Sika Caulk to seal it in. Visually it looked no different than the other joints in the drive. The wire is simply a 14 ga stranded wire, available pretty much anywhere... I got 2500' Spools at an electrical supply house.

Its still a tractor project, especially with a cable plow, which if I had know that Rural King and Agri-Supply sold them, I'd have bought one... that was a lot of ditch to rake shut and it was all wide open field. A couple of guys have even built them, if I remember right, KennyD made one up for his garage build.
 

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I'm also a proponent for invisible fence. I have two German Short Haired Pointers - Bird dogs and they need to run. I trenched in just under 5000' of wire in a day, had about 3 people helping back fill with garden rakes. It took the new pup all of about 10 minutes to figure out the fence and where she can and can't be. The nice part of the system is you can add on to block off a garden or landscaping so that they aren't digging up the Mrs' Petunias or tearing up the mulch next to the front walk.

Fences make great neighbors when you don't have very good neighbors, but I still like the invisible fence system. No gates to leave open or maintain. No digging under the fence to escape. Peace of mind when I'm at work as they have a dog door in the garage to get out of the inclement weather and the freedom to run and play that they deserve.

I have a gravel drive, so I cut it with the trencher, then cleaned up the ditch with a mattock and laid a conduit for the wire so if I ever have a problem I do not have to open up the drive again. At my old home, I had a concrete drive, I opened up an existing joint with a masonry blade (gas powered demo saw or even a 4" angle grinder with a diamond blade would work good), laid the wire in the joint and used a Sika Caulk to seal it in. Visually it looked no different than the other joints in the drive. The wire is simply a 14 ga stranded wire, available pretty much anywhere... I got 2500' Spools at an electrical supply house.

Its still a tractor project, especially with a cable plow, which if I had know that Rural King and Agri-Supply sold them, I'd have bought one... that was a lot of ditch to rake shut and it was all wide open field. A couple of guys have even built them, if I remember right, KennyD made one up for his garage build.
Maintenance free also.
 
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Here's a counterpoint to consider regarding Invisible Fence and its competitors...

Unless you're going to get collars for all of the wildlife in your area, it will do nothing to keep other animals (and people / prying eyes) out. Around here, I have to be considerate of bear, fox, coyote, and even some other neighborhood dogs as potential "predators" that could come into my yard and cause issues for my pups. I address this with a lot of light, electronic training collars (exactly the same as invisible fence except that I use a radio control to activate the collars whenever I need to), and good policing of the back yard before I let them out. Only incidents I ever had were once when there was a fairly large buck in the corner of the yard where the lights don't shine (and he was a bigger threat to me than the dogs - his dropped head and snort said so) and once when there was a rabbit that the pups tried to go after. The e-collars solved the bunny problem very quickly. :)
 

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post holes

May be a little off topic. If you want your posts to stay in great shape do not use concrete around them. It will only hold the moisture longer. I put up a fence in 1980 for a friend using 6 inch pressure treated post. The soil was sandy yet some what damp. We just back filled with dirt from the hole much like a power pole. Withing a few years they started to rot. When I built my pole barn they used a cement disk in the bottom of the hole for the 6x6 and then filled with crushed rock and temped in the post after plumbing it straight. I questioned why they did it that way. The reason was for drainage. They said they have never had a post rot with the gravel but many had with the cement. When I replace a fence post today I use the stone in the bottom then around the post. Packs very hard if done right. Let the post breath and it will last forever. Maybe not forever
 

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Great advice above. Just one more note. If you're setting square posts, measure them diagonally. I had to use a 12" auger to set 6x6" square posts for a barn. A 9" was too small to pour concrete around the post.
Formula for distance across corners of a square is roughly 1.414 X distance across flats. Example 1.414 x 6 =8.484
 

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post hole

A few weeks ago there was a discussion on a sub soiler. About 10 years ago I make a cable puller out of one by attaching a smaller clevis and a wire puller for electrical cable (Japanese finger) type. You can get them for all sizes and I sued it to pull in 1 inch conduit with a 855 4x4 without weights. Worked great, also have pulled in outdoor romex cable as well.
 
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