Green Tractor Talk banner

21 - 40 of 50 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,350 Posts
Having used the first gen Milwaukee trimmer myself, I can see why. It really is a beast.
Is anyone unhappy with the weight of the Milwaukee M18 Quik Lok motor? I see 12.3 pounds listed in the specs. I can get the motor, string trimmer, blower, charger, and two 8.0Ah batteries for $600 at Home Depot. Those tools from Stihl cost about $900 with only one battery. I'm about ready to switch over if the extra weight seems manageable.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,804 Posts
My one complaint with the Milwaukee tools, all of them, blower, trimmer/edger powerhead, and especially the hedge trimmers is they are heavy. They work great and I would not trade performance or durability for weight but they are a load.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jgayman

·
Registered
3025E
Joined
·
163 Posts
Currently, they have a KMA130
View attachment 781818

But there's also a KMA135 of unknown availability
View attachment 781819

Personally, I'm going to hold out for the KMA135 because of the onboard battery. I dislike the idea of either a belt clip or backpack battery for quick jobs. Being tethered doesn't sound too convenient for something I will be picking up and setting down frequently.
I’m on the hunt for the KMA 135 too, they’re not showing up yet. I reserved my name at 3 different dealers in the area with no success yet. Hopefully the supply chains with start to flow again soon, each dealer says they’re on back order.
 

·
Registered
2014 1025R
Joined
·
61 Posts
I've gone with Ego for nearly all of my small garden tools, including push mower and chainsaws. Makita LXT fills in the construction tools. On my 10 acres, they're plenty. Yeah, the saws are slower than gas. Yeah, I wouldn't want to go anything over an 18" bar. Yeah, the stock chain is safe but overly conservative. But they're easy, they're quiet, they're predictable, and once you have a few batteries, you will not run out of power. Since I tend to work alone, I'm switching tasks fairly frequently, which helps blunt many of the downsides of the electric tools. Just remember that if you've under half battery, a task switch is a good time to swap the battery on the tool for the one on the charger.

With Ego, you need to be aware of the battery you're putting on the tool. I have a 2.0 Ah and a 2.5 Ah...these are limited in the current they can push. They will run the chainsaws, but they will limit the tool. The 14" chainsaw kit comes with the 2.5Ah battery, which is a shame, as it limits the tool. I have two 5.0 Ah batteries as well. This doubles the available current and erases many of the frustrations I originally felt with the tool. It adds weight to the saw, but it's still lighter than a gas saw. Make sure you have at least a pair of 5.0 Ah batteries and a quick charger Many tools only come with a slow charger, but bigger tools like push mowers often come with the fast charger. If you're buying many tools, buy the ones that come with big batteries and quick chargers as the kit and buy the small tools bare. That will get you the best bang for your buck and the least frustration with the tools.

The electric saw has less rotating mass than the gas saw and it's going slower. This is both good and bad. On one hand, it reduces the gyroscopic forces and vibrations on the saw, seriously saving your hands and wrists. On the other hand, it's one of the reasons electric saws stall out in a cut more easily. Unlike a gas saw, though, a stall is a non-event on an electric saw. Pick it off the cut surface for a moment, pull the trigger again, wait for full speed, and don't push so damn hard this time! Good technique with a chainsaw is rewarded, like any saw: think about how the cut will move as you cut and cut the way you were taught. The electric saw puts up with less binding and punishes bad technique with poor performance. On the other hand, a gas saw has a greater tendency to punish poor technique with kickback, so pick your poison. I choose poor performance over poor safety, but I'm a homeowner, not a pro.

As for the transformer looks, yeah, I don't dig the styling. The damn things work, though. They've been dead reliable. Dropping, throwing, and generally being unkind to the tool, short of straight abuse, has done nothing to tool. Not a thing has broken. I have the 14" (brushed) and 18" (brushless) saws. I have the pole saw, string trimmer, push mower, and leaf blower (540, I think). No battery has failed. So, it's won me over.

Not much to say for Makita that hasn't already been said. We all know the LXT system is a great system and Makita makes a full line of tools that range from good to excellent. They may not always be the very best tool in a particular category, but they are consistently good across all categories. That makes it a very good system for getting locked into like you are with any battery system. I've heard good things about the Makita 36V chainsaws, but I have not tried them myself.

I won't go back to gas. For my use, the time wasted on fueling, mixing, fixing, maintaining, and starting gas engines far overrides any performance gain. Not to mention the noxious fumes (yeah, I know, some like it, but I'm happy to do without) and heavy vibrations (my wrists hate me after a day with a vibrating tool). There does come a point where it really is too big for batteries. Chipper/shredder, log splitter, generator...all gas. If I can't lift it with one hand, it probably needs a gas motor, but otherwise I'm sticking with batteries.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
As for the transformer looks, yeah, I don't dig the styling. The damn things work, though. They've been dead reliable. Dropping, throwing, and generally being unkind to the tool, short of straight abuse, has done nothing to tool. Not a thing has broken. I have the 14" (brushed) and 18" (brushless) saws. I have the pole saw, string trimmer, push mower, and leaf blower (540, I think). No battery has failed. So, it's won me over.
How long have you had them? I think durability for moderate use is my main question mark. Everybody's saying "buy gas first" but I'm kind of leaning the opposite way, and starting with the Ego blower or chainsaw to see just how bad it is compared to gas. I might cut up 5-6 12" diameter trees in the next few months, and I'm not sure it makes that much difference whether a cut takes 5 seconds or 20 seconds for that volume. If that's the price I pay for doing away with engines and gas and lower noise, I'll take it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,179 Posts
What's the line where you reach for the gas saw versus the electric? I've watched those test videos where the guy cuts a stack of 9 4x4s and that seems to be getting near the upper end of what I'd need it to do. I have a few larger trees to remove but I'm going to pay a guy to do those since it's been a long time since I've dropped 50-60' trees and I'm not comfortable doing that on my own just yet.
I’d say when the bar on the battery saw isn’t long enough. I dropped a 50-foot Doug Fur and did all the limbing and bucking with my Milwaukee M18 chainsaw. The base was just a wee bit bigger than my bar.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,179 Posts
Is anyone unhappy with the weight of the Milwaukee M18 Quik Lok motor? I see 12.3 pounds listed in the specs. I can get the motor, string trimmer, blower, charger, and two 8.0Ah batteries for $600 at Home Depot. Those tools from Stihl cost about $900 with only one battery. I'm about ready to switch over if the extra weight seems manageable.
Not so much the power head itself but the entire Quik-Lok system is very heavy (to me). The hedge trimmer attachment is extremely heavy and the pole saw is a bit unwieldy as well. The string trimmer attachment not so much. Despite the weight they are very powerful and well built.

By comparison I‘ve had the Black and Decker 20V pole saw for many years and find myself reaching for it at times for smaller jobs due to it being so much lighter than the Milwaukee Quik-Lok.
 
  • Like
Reactions: coaltrain

·
Registered
2014 1025R
Joined
·
61 Posts
How long have you had them? I think durability for moderate use is my main question mark. Everybody's saying "buy gas first" but I'm kind of leaning the opposite way, and starting with the Ego blower or chainsaw to see just how bad it is compared to gas. I might cut up 5-6 12" diameter trees in the next few months, and I'm not sure it makes that much difference whether a cut takes 5 seconds or 20 seconds for that volume. If that's the price I pay for doing away with engines and gas and lower noise, I'll take it.
Admittedly, not a huge length of time. Between 1-4 years, depending on the tool. The chainsaws get a workout on the 10 acres, though. I've dropped several trees of that size. I started with the 14", which can do a 12" tree, though barely. The 16" is probably the goldilocks version, but already owning the 14", I bought the 18" to help with the larger trees. It's a significantly better saw. The brushless motor with soft start is very nice. I've never used the light, but nice to know it's there. The chain auto-tensions on the 18", which is a mixed-bag feature if you like a particular tension. The variable speed trigger is not all that useful...when do you run a chainsaw at anything other than full speed? The oil reservoir has a larger opening and is larger overall. The 16" is more similar to the 18" than the 14". You definitely want what they call a 2P battery (4 or 5 Ah). Avoid the 1P batteries (2 and 2.5 Ah) for chainsaws. They also make a 3P battery at 7.5 Ah, but it's heavy and overkill.

I use these two saws to also buck the trees into firewood. A 5 Ah battery will run long enough that it's twin is ready when it runs out, when using the fast charger. (The fast charger came with the mower and I have two slow chargers that came with the other kits. I think the 18" chainsaw came with a slow charger, which is annoying. Recharge times are doubled with the slow charger: 1.5 hr vs 45 min for 5 Ah. Nice to have one slow charger, though, as it's easier on the battery so I use that one when I'm done for the day. The commercial charger lets you pick fast or slow, but I don't have one of those.)

For reference, here's about half the wood my saws have processed in the last year or so. The other half is already burned up.

781973


Yes, I'm building another woodshed to the left to hold the random pile in front of the one on the right. There's now a third stacked row on the right (I just grabbed a picture from my photo library.) All that was done electric without issue. Not a ton compared to some places, but I'm proud of it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
I am all-in on Ego! I LOVE their tools.

I have the 18" chainsaw and a Stihl 18" saw. The Ego chainsaw uses Oregon bars and chains. It's real and will chew the hell out of trees. If you have a day's worth of work, you'll want a couple of batteries, but in a dead race, the 18" battery saw vs. the gas, the ego won’t always win, but it’s quiet, doesn’t vibrate and is easy to work with.

I have the Ego string trimmer with pole-saw. The pole saw also has an oregon bar and chain as well as an auto-oiler... and is a freaking beast. My neighbor has a Stihl and asks to borrow mine because it's quiter, cooler and safer (you can hear and talk to others while it's running). So if you hear "HONEY, KIDS UNDER YOUR LIMB", you can stop and not have bad things happen.

I have ear protection, but don't use it because the electric saw is so darn quiet.

When using the trimmer, I wear my ear protection, but it's because I run with a commercial 0.1 line instead of the .06 of your other electric folks. The string makes a wicked loud noise as it whips through the air and is loud. Using the larger battery, I can cover my entire 1.2 acres of mowed yard (house, pool, shed, beds) and still have some left over for the leaf blower.

The leaf blower is about equivalent to what my neighbor has on his gas trimmer / blower equivalent.

The only thing I would recommend is having 2 or 3 of the Ego batteries. I have 3, one is the 5.0 the others are the 2.5. This lets me rotate tools.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,238 Posts
It’s a vary complex equation for choosing battery vs gas.

I don’t like to leave gas saws idling more then a minute. I believe in air cooling, but excessive idling is different. The 12” Dewalt was the right choice for 4-8” birch, and smaller winter blowdowns.

I have a green works pole saw and probably won’t buy another of their tools. It cuts good, but has been replaced on warranty after minimal use. The issue was on the circuit board. It died between uses.

With big brands you don’t have to worry, off brands do use some cheap components.


If you have trees and occasional storms I would always heave a 60cc class gas saw or above available with a bar that can meet in the middle of anything that might land on your property.

Run any gas equipment twice a year at a minimum, even if stored without fuel. I just rebuilt the carb and fuel line on my fathers saw because they crapped out from non use. That’s not generally an issue with electric.
 

·
Premium Member
'20 1025R, 120R, 54D
Joined
·
1,212 Posts
.Run any gas equipment twice a year at a minimum, even if stored without fuel. I just rebuilt the carb and fuel line on my fathers saw because they crapped out from non use. That’s not generally an issue with electric.
I store my saws and anything 2-stroke with TruFuel, VP SEF, or similar and have never had any problems over the last 10 years. It doesn't go bad like pump gas.

Last summer we got hit by a tropical storm and a tornado/microburst within weeks of each other (the reason my wife agreed to the 1025R and grapple). Had lots of trees down after the storm. I grabbed a saw that hadn't been used in almost 4 years and it started on the 3rd or 4th pull!

I use the canned fuel in most of my 2-stroke stuff. It's expensive but I haven't had to rebuild any carbs or replace any fuel lines in years. If I know I'll be cutting over a weekend or 2 I'll mix a gallon of pump gas, but still store everything with the canned stuff.


If I know
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,238 Posts
I store my saws and anything 2-stroke with TruFuel, VP SEF, or similar and have never had any problems over the last 10 years. It doesn't go bad like pump gas.

Last summer we got hit by a tropical storm and a tornado/microburst within weeks of each other (the reason my wife agreed to the 1025R and grapple). Had lots of trees down after the storm. I grabbed a saw that hadn't been used in almost 4 years and it started on the 3rd or 4th pull!

I use the canned fuel in most of my 2-stroke stuff. It's expensive but I haven't had to rebuild any carbs or replace any fuel lines in years. If I know I'll be cutting over a weekend or 2 I'll mix a gallon of pump gas, but still store everything with the canned stuff.


If I know
It’s not about the gas going bad, it’s the diaphragm pumps that dry out and crack.
 

·
Premium Member
'20 1025R, 120R, 54D
Joined
·
1,212 Posts
It’s not about the gas going bad, it’s the diaphragm pumps that dry out and crack.
They usually only dry out from no fuel (if run dry before storage) or ethanol in pump gas. Ethanol eats rubber and plastic (fuel lines) like kids eat candy. As I said the canned fuel has never failed me. I can walk into the garage and know any of my 2-stroke equipment will work when I need it.

I do have some Husqvarna battery stuff. I was given a 120i chainsaw and bought a blower, string trimmer, and hedge clipper so the wife can use them. They're nice but battery life is average at best.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,896 Posts
I was looking at batteries the other day.

At about the mid range in amp hours, the battery alone costs as much as my gas MS170 did and it is at least 6 years old and has had a lot of use.

For the every so often quick stuff that is too big for the loppers, I have a pruning saw and a bow saw. With a sharp blade they are quick, quiet, and very cost effective.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I'm making the switch to cordless for many of my outdoor tools. Like many of you I'm struggling with going all in. I still occasionally need (or think I might need) a big gas chainsaw or trimmer with a brush cutter blade or something. I started with an EGO string trimmer. The 2.5 battery is good for about as long as I want to trim at one time. Plenty of power for trimming grass and weeds. And so quiet! I also love how simple it is. Just pop the battery in and hit the trigger. I picked up their 650 CFM blower last fall and it's awesome too. Again, the 5.0 battery lasts as long as I want to run it and the performance is as good as any other residential blower I've used. It's also proven so quick and easy to grab I tend to find alternative uses for it. Blowing water off the car, blowing leaves off the pool cover, garage floor dusting, etc...

I think a small arborist top handle cordless saw would be amazing. I use a cordless sawzall with a pruning blade for most of my apple tree pruning but still use an Echo CS300 for the bigger pruning. Cordless would be perfect for that size saw I think. The Milwaukee hatchet is tempting but look a little small for my uses.

I would really love to swap my diesel Kubota zero turn for an electric. Mean Green Mowers look amazing and some day I'll be able to justify the expense to swap. Maybe a used market will let that happen in a couple of years.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,434 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I have one of the STIHL battery series (I think it's the AK) and HUSQV...
Stihl lawn mower, trimmer and blower. All are great...but the build quality is and feels consumer grade. I have had a few problems with the presence control (need to be pushed or held to allow the power to turn on) on the trimmer.

I got the Husky in the chain saw, pole saw, and heavier trimmer (they told me it would take an 8" metal blade for light brush trimming...but the dealer never seems to find the correct blade kit). These are excellent and definitely a professional target market and build quality. I looked into them after I was having some tree work done, and the tree crew was using the Husky battery top-handle saws. As I prefer a top-handle saw myself for light to medium trimming, I was immediately smitten.

For me one of the primary criteria for selection was the confidence that the battery platform would be around for the long-haul. The last thing I wanted was a bunch of tools with no functioning batteries. Both Stihl and Husky seemed to have a policy to maintain battery platforms for a long-time. I also contacted a few battery rebuilders to verify that the batteries were rebuildable.

I was hesitant to look at any of the box-store brands, or any brand without a local servicing dealer...so that ruled them out.

My dealer does carry (I think it's) EGO, and the dealer has good things to say about the line; but when I was looking only Husky had the top handle saw, so that was to be my brand of choice.

I will never get rid of working gas tools, but the confidence and convenience of the battery tools wins most time for quick work...and times I want to keep the noise down.

I just bought myself 3 acres of $#@! to clean up :ROFLMAO:.

...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
I recently picked up Ryobi 40V chainsaw and auger. Both getting the job done on my near 3 acres so far. Just don't expect them to be all-day lumberjack and polesetter machines. Occasional use machines that don't need gas and don't have fuel problems every spring. Ryobi has been using the same 18v form for over 20 years, I anticipate they will do the same with 40v. There are much more powerful, and much more expensive, machines out there for heavier usage. Know your typical usage requirements first then find something that can comfortably handle the daily work. I didn't think I would need much and Ryobi was adequate for that. I already had gas tools for other work so didn't see a need to duplicate on those.
 
  • Like
Reactions: sansbury

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,166 Posts
Interesting discussion for me as I don't have any electric outdoor tools but at some point they are in my future. For pure clean up of overgrown areas, I think a good trimmer with a brush blade is the ticket. I have two Stihl gas trimmers. I use a 90 most often, usually with the triple blade and it's a great combo. I have a upper end commercial trimmer as well but that's more than I usually need and if I run it more than a few minutes I need to harness for it. However for thinning of forestry stands, that's the ticket. Just take a couple of blades with you or expect to sharpen them on the saw because of the dirt that's hitting the blade.

The 90 series is the bottom end of the "commercial" trimmers and runs around $300 most of the time. Don't tell Stihl but I have the round handle and run either the triple blade or a saw blade on it. They won't sell that combo directly but you can buy the saw and then the blade/shield at the same time which will run the cost up another $50 or so. You can buy a 90 with handlebars and saw blade set up as one unit but if I need handle bars the bigger unit is available for me.

I use non-ethanol gas and have had little or no issues with the carbs. The 90 gets used a lot; the bigger unit less but when it comes out of the shed it means I'll run it until I'm flat worn out. I don't see cordless tools filling either niche for heavy brush clearing. Once the heavy work is done, I think cordless has a lot of advantages.

When I do buy cordless, a pole saw will be the primary purchase but I'll look at the whole system. Pole saw, blower, limbing chainsaw and trimmer would be the purchase order. I'd look at Dewalt first as I have the 20v tools, charger etc. but would not rule out others. Two of my kids have cordless mowers and are very happy. One has Ego and the other has Greenworks or ECO. Ego seems to have a larger lineup including a zero turn mower if I remember right.

Treefarmer
 
  • Like
Reactions: sansbury

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,856 Posts
Is anyone unhappy with the weight of the Milwaukee M18 Quik Lok motor? I see 12.3 pounds listed in the specs. I can get the motor, string trimmer, blower, charger, and two 8.0Ah batteries for $600 at Home Depot. Those tools from Stihl cost about $900 with only one battery. I'm about ready to switch over if the extra weight seems manageable.
Yep, not a fan of the weight one bit. Parked it on wall.
I'm using my old Stihl gas powered trimmer again. Just faster and easier. I love the pole saw M18, but it's not something i use every week like a trimmer.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gizmo2
21 - 40 of 50 Posts
Top