Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Since I had my new 1025R in the shop and disassembled for the Independent Lift installation, it was also a good opportunity to install the electrical wiring for the cab that'll be installed next fall and additional wiring for auxiliary items. As soon as I ordered the tractor, I also ordered the factory service manuals, so I would have the wiring diagram and disassembly procedures. After reviewing the wiring diagrams, the 1025R has a number of vacant fuse and relay locations in the power distribution block. Most of these are utilized the on the 1026R, which I'm speculating is the European export model by the additional functions/features supported on that model. I guess Europeans are more discerning and refined than Jack Pine Savage Yankees and Hillbilly Johnny Rebs.

I chose to utilize these vacant relay and fuse location for the wiring additions as it results in a much more tidy, organized, installation than utilizing inline fuseholders and finding relay mounting locations. So the first step was to examine the terminals utilized in the power distribution block, identify the manufacture, and source them. This became a far more time consuming process than I originally thought.

The first challenge was extracting one each of the no less than five different terminals utilized! Typically, the terminal itself has a lock barb on its body that mates with a corresponding slot/notch in the body. Not in this case. The terminals have no locking barbs. The locking tabs/barbs are part of the composite power distribution block material. After extracting one each of the different type of terminals utilizing one of my 30+ terminal extraction tools (most of the time it is a small screwdriver), I began the process of identifying them. There,m literally, has to be well over 100,000 different types of terminals. The power distribution block nor the terminals had any manufacture identification. However, the OEM relays were Tyco, so I started there which was a lucky guess as that is what they are. (Tyco acquired AMP industries a large terminal connector manufacturer. After some bad press, they changed their marketing name from Tyco to "TE", which is an acronym for Tyco Enterprises. So when searching for components, they can be listed utilizing any of these three brands or a combination thereof.)

Here is what I came up with:

The large relays utilize two different terminals, one style for the relay coil and the other for the relay contacts. Below is a photo of the coil terminal and here is a link to where I sourced them.

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/te-connectivity-amp-connectors/1-160759-1/A99650CT-ND/1981359

DSCF1763.JPG

The large relay contact terminal is pictured below and here is a link to where I sourced them. I've included two links. The difference between the terminals is the gauge of wire they'll accept.

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/te-connectivity-amp-connectors/927829-2/A123063CT-ND/5419535

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/te-connectivity-amp-connectors/927833-2/A123065CT-ND/5419537

DSCF1754.JPG

The small relays utilized two different terminals. The links and photos are below:

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/te-connectivity-amp-connectors/170384-2/A100478CT-ND/2233164

DSCF1756.JPG

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/te-connectivity-amp-connectors/42452-5/A111186CT-ND/4142572

DSCF1755.JPG

The Mini-ATC fuse terminals is where I struggled to locate the Power Distribution Center terminal. I was never able to locate an exact match, even are viewing hundreds of terminals on TE's product applicator web pages. I finally found a substitute that works well with a minor modification:

http://www.mouser.com/Search/ProductDetail.aspx?R=1-1355877-1virtualkey57100000virtualkey571-1-1355877-1

http://www.mouser.com/Search/ProductDetail.aspx?R=1-1355833-1virtualkey57100000virtualkey571-1-1355833-1

DSCF1758.JPG

To allow the terminal to bottom fully in the Power Distribution Center, the center's locking tab to engage the terminal, and be positioned correctly. A portion of the terminal body needs to be bent out with a small needle nose pliers. I apologize for the photo being out of focus as I was attempting to grasp the needle nose pliers with one hand and hold/operate the camera with the other.

DSCF1759.JPG

Below are side-by-side before and after photos of the terminals:

DSCF1760.JPG

DSCF1762.JPG

To simplify, reduce the number of orders, and reduce shipping expense; I ordered Panasonic relays rather than TE. The specs and terminal configuration are identical to the OEM Tyco relays, although physically smaller.

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/panasonic-electric-works/CM1-R-12V/255-2185-ND/647134

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/panasonic-electric-works/CB1-R-12V/255-2161-ND/646987

DSCF1775.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
My wiring additions consisted of the following items:

1. Battery power feed to cab fuseblock

2. Ign/Accy power feed to cab fuseblock

3. Instrument panel backlighting power feed to cab

4. Snow blower linear actuator operated chute deflector wiring to cab

5. Tow behind sprayer or other rear attachment that requires 12 volt power.

According to the Cozy Cab installation instructions, their cab wiring connects directly to the battery post clamps. After being in the two-way radio business for over 30 years, connecting anything at the battery posts is problematic. It is a corrosive environment, from battery charge venting, and the connections soon fail due to this corrosion. Cozy Cab also has a relay in this power feed, which I'm assuming is taped into their harness, to switch this feed on/off with ignition. First, I wasn't keen on the idea of the relay taped into the harness nor their method of utilizing a "tap connector" (Scotchlock or otherwise) as means of obtaining the ignition power feed to operate the relay coil. Power "tap" connectors that pierce the insulation and straddle the conductor strands are problematic, as well. The wire jacket pierce is not sealed. This allows water and other contaminants to enter the wire jacket and attack the copper conductors, potentially corroding them open or creating a "hot spot" within the wire that could lead to a fire. Additionally, the "saddle" portion of the connector typically cuts a number of the conductor strands, creating a physical weakness and more importantly, reducing the current carrying capability that, again, can create a "hot spot".

I prefer to source main power feeds from a high current source that is not subject to corrosion, typically the battery cable connection to the starter motor. In the case of the 1025R starter motor, the battery stud was short in length. There was no extra length in the stud to allow for the thickness of another high current ring terminal. In fact, from the factory, the stud length was insufficient to fully reach the top of the securing nut, not fully engaging all the threads. Adding another ring terminal would further reduce the number of stud-to-nut mating threads potentially resulting in fastener failure or stripped threads when securing. So this ruled out the starter motor stud.

When reviewing the wiring diagram, the 1026R models have a cab power point identified as "Mauser Cab Connector". Mauser is a European cab manufacturer. This power source obtains the battery source feed from the NC (normally closed) of the Glow Plug/Mauser Cab relay. The ignition source of this cab connector is only a low current source, limited by the 10 amp fuse protecting it and other items sharing that source. The Mauser cab battery feed is noted as being protected by a 30 amp fuse, on the 1026R. While this source is protected at 30 amps, this would only be intermittently as the relay and more significantly, the fuse connection, would become hot and melt with a continuous 30 amp load.

My Cozy Cab has the heater option and I would estimate blower motor current draw as being between 10 and 15 amps. Additionally, I ordered the bracket mounts to re-position the fender top work lamps to the top front of the cab. These lamps have 37.5 watt halogen bulbs, which mean they draw 3.125 amps each (Ohm's law: 37.5 watts / 12 volts = 3.125 amps). I, also, ordered the rear work lamp, which I'm going to assume is another 37.5 watt halogen. Additionally, I ordered the interior dome lamp option. While I did not order it at this time, I may also desire to add a roof beacon in the future. So adding up the known current drain places the load at 24.375 and allowing for the unknowns, at just short of 30 amps. This would be an issue for the Power Distribution relay and fuse terminals and/or themselves.

To split the cab load up, I decided to add another relay to the Power Distribution Center, in the large relay vacancy. I describe this relay as the "Accy/Ign Relay" as it will energize with the ignition and it's output will be utilized to supply auxiliary items that will power on/of with ignition, such as the cab auxiliary lighting and roof beacon. Additionally, it will feed power to the Artillian Diverter valve that will be installed on the FEL. The NC contact of the Glow Plug/Mauser Cab Relay will supply power to the cab heater blower motor and the cab dome lamp. I prefer to have the cab dome lamp be powered with the tractor not running, which this source will provide. I will install another relay in the cab console so the heater blower motor will power on/off with ignition. So this, roughly, splits the cab load in half amongst the two sources. I'll add an additional 30 amp fuse to the Power Distribution Center to protect the output feed to the cab from the Accy/Ign Relay.

I identified the appropriate feed conductors of the OEM wiring harness within the Power Distribution Center to splice into as the OEM splice points are buried within the harness loom and accessing them would be a very difficult job, requiring removing and opening the harness. While splicing in is not as neat, splicing into the appropriate conductor yields the same current capacity. I do not cut the factory wires, but just strip off a small section of the insulation so I can wrap the tap conductor around it, solder, and tape with high quality tape, such as 3M 33 or 88. In addition to the Accy/Ign tap in the Power Distribution Center, I also tapped to add the "Mauser Cab Connector" ignition source. A that point, I had been planning on obtaining a battery source from the starter motor stud, but I hadn't pulled the protective boot back to reveal the short stud length. As I already had that tap in place, I left it.

I also tapped the instrument panel backlighting feed, in the Power Distribution Center. This is a feed to the cab. I'm not sure what switch types are being supplied with the Cozy Cab, but if they do not have backlighting, I will likely change them out for units that do. This backlighting feed will be utilized to power the cab switch backlighting.

I also feed another vacant fuse location in the Power Distribution Center from the Accy/Ign Relay output to serve the Artillian Diverter Valve.

The last item I needed to provide a power source for was the Tow Behind Sprayer or other rear mount attachment 12 volt supply. There wasn't enough space to mount another in the console top panel. As I had relocated the mower deck lift switch to the top console, adjacent to the PTO switch, this left the factory location vacant and plugged. I decided to utilize this location for the sprayer switch. JD did a pretty good job of minimizing the amount of air/dust that could enter the console from the engine compartment. So I didn't want to create any holes that would be difficult to seal. The lower factory harness had room for some additional conductors, but I didn't want to cut it open, as it would be near impossible to seal up again without removing. So I pierced the console end closure tape with a rigid fish wire (old two-way radio antenna rod) and fished it through to the Power Distribution Center end. I attached two #18 wires and pulled them into the console and routed down to the switch location inside a short length of split loom.

As I could possibly be powering something other than a sprayer, I required a heavier gauge wire (#16) to the rear power jack, so I decided to utilize the vacant small relay location as a "Sprayer Relay" and have the switch control it's coil. When I had spliced into the OEM harness for the Accy/Ign Relay, I also added a tap conductor to feed the Sprayer Relay. The output of the Sprayer Relay fed another vacant fuse location within the Power Distribution Center to protect the sprayer and it's wiring.

The existing OEM switches within the console are manufactured by Carling and I decided to continue with that brand for the sprayer. As I have never mowed or sprayed at night, I wasn't concerned and saw no need for a backlighted switch and none of the OEM switches were backlit, either. So I just went with a plain SPST switch. However, I did order a sealed switch as it will be exposed to rain/wash water and dust. Additionally, I ordered a terminal body for the switch to insulate the terminals and prevent shorts from un-insulated terminals when performing diagnostics with the console removed. I did, mistakenly, order a switch with terminal barrier dividers, so I had to trim them off to utilize the terminal body. All of the vendors I have provided links to within this post offer Carling switches and accessories.

http://www.mouser.com/Search/ProductDetail.aspx?R=V1DAS00B-AZB00-000virtualkey69100000virtualkey691-V1DAS00B-AZB

http://www.mouser.com/Search/ProductDetail.aspx?R=VCH-01_CONNECTOR_HOUSING_BLACKvirtualkey69100000virtualkey691-VCH-01

DSCF1769.JPG

I utilized #12 gauge wire for each of the cab power feeds. I utilized #10 gauge as the cab ground lead, as it would be carrying current from both cab power feeds and, as such, need to be larger. I terminated the grounds leads at the engine block, with the OEM harness ground leads and frame bonding strap.

As the OEM harness, in part, utilized Delphi Metri-Pack connectors, I continued with that series for cab disconnects and other connectors. I utilized the Metri-Pack 150 Series for the low current connections and the Metri-Pack 630 Series for the high current cab power feeds. I made dust sealing caps for the cab disconnects a well as others that would not be continuously connected to seal them from contaminants. Below are catalog pages from where I sourced the Metri-Pack connectors. I also sourced the split loom tubing from Waytek, previously.

Below are two Metri-Pack 150 Series connectors. The open connector is for the Artillian Diverter I'm awaiting delivery and the other is the OEM connector for the Independent Lift Electric Hydraulic Valve.

DSCF1774.JPG

Pictured below are the cab disconnects. The larger connector is the Metri-Pack 630 Series with the cab power feeds. The smaller, 6-circut connector is the cab disconnect for the snow blower chute deflector actuator, Mauser Cab ignition feed, and the backlighting feed.

DSCF1777.JPG

Below are Metri-Pack 150 Series connector for the rear sprayer and the snow blower chute deflector actuator.

DSCF1766.JPG

DSCF1776.JPG

Below are photos of the crimpers I utilized for the terminals I installed in this project. I don't believe TE (AMP) is manufacturing them any longer, but I did find the blue handle crimper on ebay. These crimpers can get quite crazy in their pricing. A low price alternative I've utilized infrequently is available from DLC.

AMP 29564 SUPER CHAMP HAND TOOL | eBay

SPRING LOADED CRIMPING TOOL - DLCparts.com - DLC Parts - David Levy

DSCF1778.JPG

DSCF1779.JPG

DSCF1781.JPG

Below is a photo of my ROI bypass. It is depicted in the bypass mode. Installing the hanging plug restores it to operational mode.

DSCF1765.JPG

I plan to continue this thread when I install the cab and configure its wiring.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
Very nice write up, its descriptive and done like it came from the factory that way:bigthumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
Very impressive work. All of your work looks like it was done at the factory! Excellent write up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Very nice!
Any ideas as to what a Deere 4400
Uses for these connections at the rear of the distribution block?
I know the fuses are different.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Very nice!
Any ideas as to what a Deere 4400
Uses for these connections at the rear of the distribution block?
I know the fuses are different.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
What I've typically done is determine how an existing terminal is retained, release it, examine it and then attempt to match it up by viewing a manufacturer's data sheet. Examine the distribution block and see if you can find any markings that will identify the manufacture and possibly the series. That will help narrow it down. Once you've identified the terminal's part number, you can search for a distributor that will sell them in small quantities.

If you would be so kind, maybe create a new thread identifying the tractor model and power distribution center in the subject line. Then list all the pertinent info and photos in the thread. In this manner, it'll make it simpler for the next fellow to yield the fruits of your labors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
MCS20 and Snowblower Chute Linear Actuator

After I authored the initial posts of this thread, the MCS20 material handling system was announced and I purchased it. I didn't care for the actuator switch be mounted on a bracket that fits into the storage cubby. So I removed the rear sprayer switch I had previously installed, that occupied the OEM "Independent Lift" switch location in the Operator's Console, and replaced it with the MCS20 switch and adapted the wiring as necessary.

Hind sight being 20-20, this same switch can be utilized to operate the snowblower chute linear actuator. As I already had it installed in the cab overhead console, I left it there and, in turn, on a separate switch. I mention it now in the event another is contemplating adding wiring for either the snowblower chute or the MSC20.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Since I had my new 1025R in the shop and disassembled for the Independent Lift installation, it was also a good opportunity to install the electrical wiring for the cab that'll be installed next fall and additional wiring for auxiliary items. As soon as I ordered the tractor, I also ordered the factory service manuals, so I would have the wiring diagram and disassembly procedures. After reviewing the wiring diagrams, the 1025R has a number of vacant fuse and relay locations in the power distribution block. Most of these are utilized the on the 1026R, which I'm speculating is the European export model by the additional functions/features supported on that model. I guess Europeans are more discerning and refined than Jack Pine Savage Yankees and Hillbilly Johnny Rebs.

I chose to utilize these vacant relay and fuse location for the wiring additions as it results in a much more tidy, organized, installation than utilizing inline fuseholders and finding relay mounting locations. So the first step was to examine the terminals utilized in the power distribution block, identify the manufacture, and source them. This became a far more time consuming process than I originally thought.

The first challenge was extracting one each of the no less than five different terminals utilized! Typically, the terminal itself has a lock barb on its body that mates with a corresponding slot/notch in the body. Not in this case. The terminals have no locking barbs. The locking tabs/barbs are part of the composite power distribution block material. After extracting one each of the different type of terminals utilizing one of my 30+ terminal extraction tools (most of the time it is a small screwdriver), I began the process of identifying them. There,m literally, has to be well over 100,000 different types of terminals. The power distribution block nor the terminals had any manufacture identification. However, the OEM relays were Tyco, so I started there which was a lucky guess as that is what they are. (Tyco acquired AMP industries a large terminal connector manufacturer. After some bad press, they changed their marketing name from Tyco to "TE", which is an acronym for Tyco Enterprises. So when searching for components, they can be listed utilizing any of these three brands or a combination thereof.)

Here is what I came up with:

The large relays utilize two different terminals, one style for the relay coil and the other for the relay contacts. Below is a photo of the coil terminal and here is a link to where I sourced them.

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/te-connectivity-amp-connectors/1-160759-1/A99650CT-ND/1981359

View attachment 332714

The large relay contact terminal is pictured below and here is a link to where I sourced them. I've included two links. The difference between the terminals is the gauge of wire they'll accept.

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/te-connectivity-amp-connectors/927829-2/A123063CT-ND/5419535

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/te-connectivity-amp-connectors/927833-2/A123065CT-ND/5419537

View attachment 332778

The small relays utilized two different terminals. The links and photos are below:

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/te-connectivity-amp-connectors/170384-2/A100478CT-ND/2233164

View attachment 332730

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/te-connectivity-amp-connectors/42452-5/A111186CT-ND/4142572

View attachment 332738

The Mini-ATC fuse terminals is where I struggled to locate the Power Distribution Center terminal. I was never able to locate an exact match, even are viewing hundreds of terminals on TE's product applicator web pages. I finally found a substitute that works well with a minor modification:

http://www.mouser.com/Search/ProductDetail.aspx?R=1-1355877-1virtualkey57100000virtualkey571-1-1355877-1

http://www.mouser.com/Search/ProductDetail.aspx?R=1-1355833-1virtualkey57100000virtualkey571-1-1355833-1

View attachment 332746

To allow the terminal to bottom fully in the Power Distribution Center, the center's locking tab to engage the terminal, and be positioned correctly. A portion of the terminal body needs to be bent out with a small needle nose pliers. I apologize for the photo being out of focus as I was attempting to grasp the needle nose pliers with one hand and hold/operate the camera with the other.

View attachment 332754

Below are side-by-side before and after photos of the terminals:

View attachment 332762

View attachment 332770

To simplify, reduce the number of orders, and reduce shipping expense; I ordered Panasonic relays rather than TE. The specs and terminal configuration are identical to the OEM Tyco relays, although physically smaller.

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/panasonic-electric-works/CM1-R-12V/255-2185-ND/647134

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/panasonic-electric-works/CB1-R-12V/255-2161-ND/646987

View attachment 332874
what beautiful work , how long did this take you and what do you do for a living ?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
107 Posts
cross reference #

Hi all. I' trying to wire in my Artillian grapple, was wondering if anybody had a cross reference number for the power distribution center connectors that go into the back of the fuse block. (mouser 571-1-1355877-1) Something I may be able to hit up NAPA or CARQUEST?

Thanks all!



Dave
 
  • Like
Reactions: SulleyBear

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,360 Posts
Hi all. I' trying to wire in my Artillian grapple, was wondering if anybody had a cross reference number for the power distribution center connectors that go into the back of the fuse block. (mouser 571-1-1355877-1) Something I may be able to hit up NAPA or CARQUEST?

Thanks all!



Dave
Not sure exactly which part you are referencing, but I have found as I have added components to the cab power supply, my standard electrical heat shrink fittings and all other electrical connectors are the same as the rest of my connectors as far as fit and connection. Are you going to the roof power panel for 12 volt power for the diverter valve control?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Toughsox

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Hi all. I' trying to wire in my Artillian grapple, was wondering if anybody had a cross reference number for the power distribution center connectors that go into the back of the fuse block. (mouser 571-1-1355877-1) Something I may be able to hit up NAPA or CARQUEST?

Thanks all!



Dave
Hi Dave,

I recall at least two different members posting they had found a terminal at NAPA that fits the power distribution center to add another fuse. I did a quick search in "sub-compact" utilizing the search word NAPA. I didn't find the posts, but I'm a bit of a hurry. I'll let you search more diligently. If you don't find it, PM me and I'll mail you a couple.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,701 Posts
Hi all. I' trying to wire in my Artillian grapple, was wondering if anybody had a cross reference number for the power distribution center connectors that go into the back of the fuse block. (mouser 571-1-1355877-1) Something I may be able to hit up NAPA or CARQUEST?

Thanks all!



Dave
Discussed in this video. Napa part number is in the description, I think.

Artillian 3rd Function Diverter Kit Installation John Deere 1025R Grapple
Artillian 3rd Function Diverter Kit Installation John Deere 1025R Grapple - YouTube
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
We need a sticky for part numbers and sources for this kind of thing. I spent 30 minutes looking for the aftermarket source a member posted for the Independent Lift hydraulic cylinder and never did find it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Napa NW 725452
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tractor Tim
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top