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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I came across a JD video called: "Regeneration, it's a good thing".

Here's the main point of the video: "Lower engine loads with high rpm's cause soot build-up leading to regeneration".

So for example if you are just moving dirt, mulch, or just driving down your field or driveway, you should not be operating at high rpm's (or WOT), per this video.
I re-read my 2032R manual (2nd gen) pages 230-2 to 230-6 and it makes no mention of this. Maybe you guys knew this but as a 1st time MCUT owner I was of the belief that the higher your rpm's, the cleaner your exhaust filter would be, regardless of engine load. Apparently not.
Learned something new today.
 

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I came across a JD video called: "Regeneration, it's a good thing".

Here's the main point of the video: "Lower engine loads with high rpm's cause soot build-up leading to regeneration".

So for example if you are just moving dirt, mulch, or just driving down your field or driveway, you should not be operating at high rpm's (or WOT), per this video.
I re-read my 2032R manual (2nd gen) pages 230-2 to 230-6 and it makes no mention of this. Maybe you guys knew this but as a 1st time MCUT owner I was of the belief that the higher your rpm's, the cleaner your exhaust filter would be, regardless of engine load. Apparently not.
Learned something new today.
Why they don't make that more well known is beyond me. I've ran into a few Regen problems with my work (Deere tech) and I have seen them be caused by low engine load. Or pto work that doesn't load the engine but causes high rpm. A 6170R on a feed mixer was a good example. It never got above 25-35% engine load and had real trouble with regens. If your not workin it hard, try to reduce rpm a bit to help combat soot. Or work it harder if that's an option. I know it's not always possible. But I want you and everyone else to have a trouble free DPF experience. Just my thoughts as a tech.
 

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I had read something similar from other sources a while ago and I didn't think it made sense ?
I always witness older diesels emit particulates when they encounter a load significant enough to drop the rpm's some.
My logic (perhaps misplaced) is that lower rpm's would result in easily encountering a load significant enough to lug the engine and "smoke".
Of course conversely, higher rpm's will pump more overall volume of all gasses through the DPF.
Maybe lower rpm's and lugging elevates heat even though it produces smoke?
 
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My theory behind it matches your last sentence, the lower rpms increases engine load and makes more heat, engine output lower at lower rpms? That's always been my thought on it. And the smoke you see is unburnt diesel fuel in the exhaust. Some of which can still happen in these newers engines but it doesn't make it out the pipe usually. Too much fuel not enough air is what makes the smoke. For example semi starting off at a light from idle, takes engine rpm climbing to creat enough exhaust gasses to spin turbo up to build boost. Your on the right track I think, and hopefully some of this makes sense. I tried to explain the best I could.
 

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More information for you to read if your curious:
A small puff of smoke during quick acceleration is acceptable with older diesel engines due to a lag before the turbocharger’s air flow can match the increased volume of diesel fuel injected into the cylinders. Newer electronic diesel engines with common rail injectorssimultaneously match the speed of the turbo with the metered flow of diesel fuel into the cylinder.

Black Smoke:
Black smoke, unlike white smoke, contains a high concentration of carbon exhaust particles. The combustion of diesel fuel in the cylinders breaks down the long chain of carbon molecules to smaller and smaller molecular chains. When the exhaust leaves the engines the byproduct is a combination of carbon dioxide and water. If something goes wrong during combustion the chemical reaction taking place is not as robust, causing long tail hydrocarbons to be left completely intact and then expelled in the form of smog or soot. Partial burning of diesel fuel results in large carbon dioxide particles as well as greenhouse gasses which contribute to air pollution. The advent of the Selective Catalytic Converter, Diesel Exhaust Fluid and Diesel Particulate Filter all helped to regenerate exhaust back into the combustion chamber to further break down particulate matter
Diagnosing Causes of Diesel Smoke at Capital Reman Exchange

Black smoke is the most common smoke color coming from a diesel engine and most likely indicates something is wrong during the combustion of the diesel fuel. When diagnosing the problem the first place to look at is the mixture of air and fuel flow into the cylinders. The engine could be delivering too much fuel, not enough fuel, too much air or simply not enough air.
Common Causes of Black Smoke:

• Clogged Air Cleaner
• Damaged Injectors
• Bent Injector Nozzles
• Incorrect Injector Timing
• Clogged Air, Fuel or Oil Filters
• Damaged Injection Pump
• Damaged/Clogged EGR Cooler
• Damaged Turbocharger
• Damaged Intercooler
• Over-Fueling the Engine
• Wrong Blend of Diesel Fuel For Temperature
• Cracked or Clogged Valves in Cylinder Head
• Improper Valve Clearance
• Low Compression due to Damaged Piston Rings
• Excessive Engine Sludge Build

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks gdow, good info.
I just realized that this same video and subject was posted by PJR832 several months ago. I missed it. Sorry for the redundancy, but I like your additional info.
 

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@gdow how would you recommend using the TractorPlus app Live Dashboard to optimize engine load vs engine speed?
 

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@gdow how would you recommend using the TractorPlus app Live Dashboard to optimize engine load vs engine speed?
I'm not familiar with that I'm sorry. If it shows you load and of course you can see speed on your tach, if your loadin the engine up rpm won't matter as much. If your load stays low lower your engine rpm down to compensate. Hopefully this helps. Basically what the video says.
 
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