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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I had previously re bent the MFWD levers on my 1025R's to make them at least a little more intuitive to grasp. But it still wasn't where I wanted it to be. I'm in and out of 4 WD continuosly. So I made another modification which seems to be where the lever should be.

I had a couple pieces of 1/2" steel rod kicking around from another project, along with 2 - 1/2" coupler nuts. I drilled out the threads from the coupler nuts to accept the 1/2" rod.

Then removed the plastic knob from the MFWD lever.

Put the spare rod in the bench vice and bent it to the shape I wanted.

Cranked up the MIG welder and welded the coupler nut to the 1/2" rod and then welded that assembly to the existing lever on the 1025R.

Painted the plastic knob orange.

Done.

All told, I bet it took me an hour to do both machines, and that's with fiddling around trying to find the position I preferred.

This is what Deere should have done to begin with.

Edit: Alternatively one could have also just put threads on the 1/2" rod and threads on the existing lever and then just screwed the parts together, but that seemed like way too much work for this guy. But if you don't have access to a welder then this is another option. Cheers.
 

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Nice mod Glen. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Great mod.

I am betting that you removed the lever before welding?

I sure would like to do something to my 1026R but a cursory glance at the lever mounting does not seem to lend itself to easy removal. :dunno:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Great mod.

I am betting that you removed the lever before welding?
Nope. Welded it with the lever in place. When I can I like to take the easy way out, or work smarter not harder.

The only small precaution I took was to disconnect the battery terminal. The terminal was way easier than messing with the lever.

Also used an old ground cover sheet to protect the seat and fibreglass from getting welding burns.
 

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Nice job on the lever modification.

The Deere engineers seemed to go to two extremes with the transfer case Low to High lever on the left and the 4wd lever on the right. The transfer case lever is about 4" to 6" too tall (long) in my opinion where the 4wd lever is just about the same amount too short (again my opinion but also others feel the same way.)

Often, you wonder if the people who design the equipment actually use it extensively in day to day situations. For the life of me, I can't see why the transfer case lever needs to stick up like it does, when I first got my tractor, I must have bumped the lever 20 times getting either on or off the tractor causing it to immediately shut down. Part of it is I have the cab, so I can't stand up at the seat to get on and off which makes contact with the lever far more likely. I have now reached a point where I rarely make contact with the lever for the transfer case but the lever still doesn't need to be as long as it is.........

The 4wd lever is just the opposite, you have to fish around the right front corner of the seat to locate it closely parallel to the operator platform.

Just so I am clear on how you connected the two levers, the end of the OEM lever is up inside the nut on the extension lever you created and then you welded the two levers together which provide the lever with strength, verses a "butt joint" of the two levers?

Also curious, Since the 4wd lever is a very flat movement front to rear, did adding the vertical extension change the feel for the levers operation or does it still just slide forward and back as before?

Thanks for your reply.......
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Just so I am clear on how you connected the two levers, the end of the OEM lever is up inside the nut on the extension lever you created and then you welded the two levers together which provide the lever with strength, verses a "butt joint" of the two levers?

Also curious, Since the 4wd lever is a very flat movement front to rear, did adding the vertical extension change the feel for the levers operation or does it still just slide forward and back as before?

Thanks for your reply.......

Correct...no butt joint. Both levers meet half way up inside the 1/2" coupling nut. Because the coupling nut is close to 2 inches long it allows a sufficient length of lever, for extra strength. Also the tolerance of rod to inside diameter of coupling nut was fairly tight.....almost could get away without welding. However they were MIG welded on both halves.

The feel for the lever is as good as before, just a whole lot easier to intuitively grab hold of.

And you do really wonder if the folks that design and engineer these things ever use them in the real world.

Must be a bean counter thing.... " If we make this rod 7 inches shorter we can save .000002 cents per 4 WD lever rod. And I'll get a bonus in my next pay packet for saving Deere some $."
 

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I like the concept....in checking my unit the extension would have to clear the seat. I check McMasters and the rod is about $10.00 stainless weldable. However the factory rod from Deere is $116.00 I don't like the idea of welding onto the factory rod but really like the concept. This might be a project for our site manager to pursue. Anyway really like the idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
really like the post and decided to do same on my tractor. I decided on 1/2 zinc from Tractor supply...welded an extension on the end...here is results....left the connecting weld a little fat for strength....why Deere didn't do this is anyone's guess.....
Night and day difference in the lever position. A 1000% improvement. I am betting more folks will make this modification to their 1025R/2025R tractors.
 

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yes, it's just a small thing but a mountain of improvement. Now Deere stuck this thing on the floor...I have one lower on my 4400 but you use your foot....who's in the engineering department at Deere?????
 

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No weld shifter extention.

This might be an alternative for those that don't have access to a welder …

I liked 'Busman's' idea of moving the 4x4 shift leaver up to where it would be more covenant to use, but instead of welding the parts together I went a different route.
I used a 2" length of 1/2" ID steel tuning, and a 1/2" OD steel rod.
~ BUT ~ instead of welding the pieces together, I used RED LOCKTITE ... I smeared a little on the rod and inserted it into the tubing just half way, and let it set up,
after it hardened, I swabbed a little into the open end of the tubing and slipped it over the original shifter shaft, till the two ends met, then I adjusted the rod to the position I liked.
After letting it set up over night, it's as solid as if I'd welded It .... :good2:

G
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Very nice Gwizz. And yet another way to join two rods. I like it.

Along with your method that you've shown us today, there should be no GTT members out there that would like the mfwd lever extended for lack of a welder or other 'tools'.
 

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This might be an alternative for those that don't have access to a welder …
I'll bet 5 minute epoxy or JB weld would work well too.

Another option would be to drill and tap the coupler for a couple of grub screws.
 

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This thread is hopefully getting the wheels at KBOH turning once again.:lol:
When i was running the land plane last week i was thinking that something similar on the three point handle would sure make it easier to feather the control better to spread material easier.
 

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with the threaded coupler is is positioner in nature. I thought that JD or someone else might offer a slid on plastic type handle...but either way you do it...I know the extra 6-8" really makes the handle useful. On tractor and implements it's the little features that really makes the difference. I know the major factories aren't interested the tooling to tweak out some of these. I do know that the 4wd "does not need to be used except when necessary.
 

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This might be an alternative for those that don't have access to a welder …

I liked 'Busman's' idea of moving the 4x4 shift leaver up to where it would be more covenant to use, but instead of welding the parts together I went a different route.
I used a 2" length of 1/2" ID steel tuning, and a 1/2" OD steel rod.
~ BUT ~ instead of welding the pieces together, I used RED LOCKTITE ... I smeared a little on the rod and inserted it into the tubing just half way, and let it set up,
after it hardened, I swabbed a little into the open end of the tubing and slipped it over the original shifter shaft, till the two ends met, then I adjusted the rod to the position I liked.
After letting it set up over night, it's as solid as if I'd welded It .... :good2:

G
Riddle me this..
Would spinning the seat on a unit with the 260 backhoe hit that extension?
 

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This is a nice modification, although, I would like to offer this caution!!!!!!!

Lets start by saying, I agree that the OEM MFWD is short and somewhat hard to reach.

That said, I believe the JD engineers had a purpose in not making this lever too long. Here is why I believe this. The MFWD lever is connected to the shift shaft that sticks out of the side of the differential. The lever is secured to the shaft by a roll pin driven through the lower lever housing and the shaft. So, when shifting the MFWD, you apply force to the lever which in turn applies twisting torque to the roll pin which turns the shift shaft. All of the torque required to shift the MFWD is applied to this roll pin.

We all know, disengaging the MFWD is usually a process of moving forward a little, moving backward a little, and possibly turning the wheels to allow easily disengagement. Many of us, like me, get a little impatient when disengaging the MFWD, so we apply more force, maybe even taking our fist and smacking the lever to disengage the MFWD. :banghead: The fact that the MFWD is hard to disengage is due to the bind that occurs internally in the differential between the front and rear drives. This bind happens because the front track and rear track moves at different speeds when turning the wheels or even moving over irregular terrain. This occurs on any mechanically locked 4WD set ups, even on you truck. This is why mfg. tell you to not run 4WD when running on hard surface. The same is true with your tractor. You should never run in 4WD with your tractor when running on hard surface. But, even when in dirt, grass or snow, internal binding occurs which makes it hard to disengage the MFWD.

So, lengthening the lever will allow you to apply more twisting torque on the MFWD shift shaft which is held in place by a roll pin.

Word of caution, do not apply too much force to the MFWD shift lever, whether you have an OEM length lever or extended lever, because you will shear the roll pin off. When disengaging the MFWD, apply very moderate force to the lever while slightly propelling forward and reverse alternately until the internal bind is release. Once the bind is release, the MFWD will disengage easily.

In my personal opinion, the MFWD lever attachment is a weak link in the 1 series tractors.

My roll pin sheared off on my 1025R a few years ago and let me tell you, it is not an easy job to replace the roll pin. It is not an easy place to get to. If you take it to a dealer to repair, they may drop the differential to get to the roll pin, depends on how knowledgeable the technician is.

When I replaced mine, I thought about installing a spiral pin, but then reconsidered. The spiral pin will have more shear strength but then the force will be applied to the roll pin hole in the shift shaft which could break the end of the shaft off. So, I put a standard roll pin back in and now I'm really careful to release all of the internal bind when disengaging the MFWD.

I apply slight force to the MFWD lever while bumping the forward propel pedal and reverse propel pedal alternately. When the internal bind releases, the MFWD disengages easily.

So, in summary, be careful. Extending the lever is a nice modification but will also multiply the twisting torque that you can apply to the shifting mechanism about three times and the connecting roll pin is no stronger than it was before the modification.

IMO, I also question whether JD designed the MFWD shift to be able to take the torque forces applied to continually shifting in and out of 4WD. :dunno:
 

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