Green Tractor Talk banner

21 - 33 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
465 Posts
Bill - Great work! I saw a couple of things in your technique that I liked, such as pulling the pole up a bit and then nudging the pole back/forth with your bucket, which helped break the bond of hard-baked clay against the pole bark and made your final pull easier. Good for you for resisting the urge to chain-up and throttle up and let-er-rip, as I have seen (and maybe have done myself).

I use some of the same skills dragging logs out of field edges, trying to remain mindful of potential collateral damage.

This thread demonstrates to power of GTT: put your challenge out there, solicit input, filter to your needs, perform the task and report back. What you did may help others with similar issues


Brian


I could have been a dentist. :laugh::laugh::laugh:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,687 Posts
It is too late now,, but, I would have cut the pole off near ground level, and attached the new flag pole to the wood pole,,

I am kinda lazy that way,, no need to dig a new hole,,, :laugh:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,772 Posts
Thank you everyone, for your comments and suggestions. It went well, easier and faster than I expected. I followed my original plan of using the FEL, since I’m lazy and didn’t feel like removing the backhoe. I figured if it wouldn’t pull it, THEN I’d switch out the backhoe for the IMatch. I’ve responded directly to a few comments and concerns, but I really appreciate all the feedback. Today was a good day to do this since the Missus was working from home. She’d be here to a) call 911 if I got squashed, and b) do some video for me. I’ve got a few stills for the thread here, and I’ll put up a video in a little while.



Because it’s fast and relatively easy to ask if I’m missing anything that could kill, injure or damage, and a whole lot less painful than finding out firsthand. Like this...



It came out real easy with the FEL, but I learned something new, and real important concerning the 3 point.




I hear you there. I usually go cutting with at least four chains, and I’ve got two power sharpeners, one in the shop, and one that runs off the truck battery. I’ve hit everything on can possibly hit inside wood during the course of my business.

The pole was approximately 20’ high and buried 5’ into the ground for a total of 25’. It’ll burn real nice in the outdoor furnace this winter. I’ve got a metal pole that telescopes up to 30’ that’s going in in its place. I sawed off the top 16’ leaving a nice stump to grab. I wrapped it as best I could (reattached the one hook after the picture) and started pulling and wiggling. I didn’t try to force anything, and it came up pretty fast and easy. I’ve got a bunch of work to do to clean up the ground and prep it for grass, but that’ll come as I get time.





View attachment 699540


Good posting and Thanks


Seeing your chain wrapped around the pole reminded me of how I would try to pull a log out of the woods. I was always jumping off dads tractor and trying again to get the log or logs out of the woods.

Half Hitch Knot | How to tie a Half Hitch Knot using Step-by-Step Animations | Animated Knots by Grog

Then my dad and older brother told me how to do this.
Take a look at the half-hitch in the posting.
Imagine the end of the line with blue wrap is the hook on your chain.
Take the hook and fasten it into the chain somewhere around the end of the point (the arrow)

Connect other end to tractor, gator , 4 wheeler and away you go.

Chain will tighten onto the log ,post . metal post . Very seldom have I found where this does not work..
Need to correct what I posted..


the end of the line with blue wrap ,,,,would have a hook take the hook and fasten it to the short piece of chain

Go around the log with chain ,,

instead of just trying to get the hook in so it will be tight against the post.

Go around the chain going toward tractor and come back and hook to the piece of chain that is wrapped around post.

I'll take a post today.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
Bill - Great work! I saw a couple of things in your technique that I liked, such as pulling the pole up a bit and then nudging the pole back/forth with your bucket, which helped break the bond of hard-baked clay against the pole bark and made your final pull easier. Good for you for resisting the urge to chain-up and throttle up and let-er-rip, as I have seen (and maybe have done myself).

I use some of the same skills dragging logs out of field edges, trying to remain mindful of potential collateral damage.

This thread demonstrates to power of GTT: put your challenge out there, solicit input, filter to your needs, perform the task and report back. What you did may help others with similar issues


Brian
Thanks, Brian, although I have to confess, I am not above throttling up and letting it rip.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
It is too late now,, but, I would have cut the pole off near ground level, and attached the new flag pole to the wood pole,,

I am kinda lazy that way,, no need to dig a new hole,,, :laugh:
That’s the best part though. The hole is still there! The Missus said to me as we were putting stuff away after the job, "You know, you could just put the new flagpole there if you want. You won’t even have to dig a hole!"

"Uhh, that was my plan from the beginning."

"Oh. Well. Okay then."

I will have to fill it in some, since it’s 5’ deep, but that’s easy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
I was going to cut the pole up today, but I ended up chopping down some weed trees instead. One of them had fallen and was blocking a path. I had The Claw on the front end to handle the brush, so I grabbed the pole and moved it aside for now. It reminded me of the time we gave our dog a bone which was way too big for her. She grabbed it in her teeth and ran around with it, not quite sure of what to do next.

45580CC1-4CE0-4C4A-8470-35B57BAD4571.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
I had a similar issue a while back except it was a 2-inch black iron pipe that someone had pounded into the ground. There was about 18-inches sticking above ground. I tried pulling up on it with a chain and the loader and the pipe just laughed.

I then wrapped the chain around the top hook on my iMatch and it pulled it right out with no problem.

The 3PH has close to 3-times the lifting force of the loader.
:bigthumb: Thanks a bunch. I learned something new - wished I had known it earlier!!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,396 Posts
Thank you everyone, for your comments and suggestions. It went well, easier and faster than I expected. I followed my original plan of using the FEL, since I’m lazy and didn’t feel like removing the backhoe. I figured if it wouldn’t pull it, THEN I’d switch out the backhoe for the IMatch. I’ve responded directly to a few comments and concerns, but I really appreciate all the feedback. Today was a good day to do this since the Missus was working from home. She’d be here to a) call 911 if I got squashed, and b) do some video for me. I’ve got a few stills for the thread here, and I’ll put up a video in a little while.



Because it’s fast and relatively easy to ask if I’m missing anything that could kill, injure or damage, and a whole lot less painful than finding out firsthand. Like this...



It came out real easy with the FEL, but I learned something new, and real important concerning the 3 point.




I hear you there. I usually go cutting with at least four chains, and I’ve got two power sharpeners, one in the shop, and one that runs off the truck battery. I’ve hit everything on can possibly hit inside wood during the course of my business.

The pole was approximately 20’ high and buried 5’ into the ground for a total of 25’. It’ll burn real nice in the outdoor furnace this winter. I’ve got a metal pole that telescopes up to 30’ that’s going in in its place. I sawed off the top 16’ leaving a nice stump to grab. I wrapped it as best I could (reattached the one hook after the picture) and started pulling and wiggling. I didn’t try to force anything, and it came up pretty fast and easy. I’ve got a bunch of work to do to clean up the ground and prep it for grass, but that’ll come as I get time.








Good posting and Thanks


Seeing your chain wrapped around the pole reminded me of how I would try to pull a log out of the woods. I was always jumping off dads tractor and trying again to get the log or logs out of the woods.

Half Hitch Knot | How to tie a Half Hitch Knot using Step-by-Step Animations | Animated Knots by Grog

Then my dad and older brother told me how to do this.
Take a look at the half-hitch in the posting.
Imagine the end of the line with blue wrap is the hook on your chain.
Take the hook and fasten it into the chain somewhere around the end of the point (the arrow)

Connect other end to tractor, gator , 4 wheeler and away you go.

Chain will tighten onto the log ,post . metal post . Very seldom have I found where this does not work..
When I pull T posts, I make several chain wraps up the post the drop the loose end of the chain across the end of chain attached to the bucket. After lifting out, a lot of times the T post just unwinds from the chain and falls to the ground.

I have been wanting to buy "C" hooks for some of my chains.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,050 Posts
Nice job. You may want to check the air pressure on your front tires though. They should not be that low when applying that much weight to them. It appears from the video the rim was getting close to the ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I couldn’t find this using search (which I’m not always good at). Just to keep myself from doing something stupid, I figured I’d ask. I have a shortened telephone pole stuck in the ground by a previous tenant here at my house. He used to work for the phone company and planted it as a flagpole. I have obtained a real flag pole (one that won’t shred my flags with splinters) and would like to pull the pole, replacing it with mine.

It seems to be somewhat loose in its hole, in that I can wiggle it with muscle power. I’m thinking if I chop off most of the top, while leaving enough to wrap a chain on, I should be able to pull it straight up with a chain on my loader bucket. Does this sound logical or is it a bad idea? If it is a bad idea, what are my alternatives? I don’t really want to dig, as I have underground water lines running from the outdoor furnace to my shop very close by, and I’m not that good with the backhoe yet.
As a ex-lineman who placed and removed many poles, you have the right idea. Make sure you cut the top of the pole off so you can control it once you get it out of the ground. The last thing you want is to pull that pole and have all that weight above the chain. It will not be pretty. 2-3 feet left above ground should be comfortable to get a chain around. The 3 feet extra also allows for chain slippage while pulling. Some poles have a bell shaped bottom and can be a ***** to pull. If the loader won't pull it, try pushing and pulling with the tractor to widen the hole. We used a mechanical jack, similar to a off road jack but shorter, when all else failed. A rigged car jack on lumber to stop the jack from sinking should work.
Hope this helps and good luck.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
As a ex-lineman who placed and removed many poles, you have the right idea. Make sure you cut the top of the pole off so you can control it once you get it out of the ground. The last thing you want is to pull that pole and have all that weight above the chain. It will not be pretty. 2-3 feet left above ground should be comfortable to get a chain around. The 3 feet extra also allows for chain slippage while pulling. Some poles have a bell shaped bottom and can be a ***** to pull. If the loader won't pull it, try pushing and pulling with the tractor to widen the hole. We used a mechanical jack, similar to a off road jack but shorter, when all else failed. A rigged car jack on lumber to stop the jack from sinking should work.
Hope this helps and good luck.
Thank you. It went well. I posted video and a few stills of my efforts. I really appreciate your comments, as they validated my method from someone with experience.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
Nice job. You may want to check the air pressure on your front tires though. They should not be that low when applying that much weight to them. It appears from the video the rim was getting close to the ground.
I will do that today. Thanks for the reminder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,346 Posts
For future endeavors, there's a way to get upward pressure from a horizontal pull. Just another way to skin the cat.

I think DieselShadow has a post about doing something similar with bushes and a piece of pipe.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6H3xFMm3Hw8
I have done this myself. I had a tire on the rim when I did it. Place a spare tire under a tow strap can work for pulling out vehicles that are stuck in mud too as it helps lift the vehicle a bit rather than sinking father down.
 
21 - 33 of 33 Posts
Top