Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 99 Posts

·
Chief Stick-picker-upper
Joined
·
11,263 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Now that the table legs have arrived, I get to begin my Farmhouse Table project that my wife(Mrs.FW) has been wanting. UPS delivered the legs this morning. I purchased them from a seller on ebay. They are the same height(29") as on the present table.
Although they have slight defects, they'll work great for a distressed Farmhouse table build. :good2:

IMG_0308.jpg

IMG_0309.jpg

This is our present dining room table. It's a Ashley brand, ~18 years old and has served us well, but the center leaf of the table is stuck and can not be removed. Believe me, I tried. I think the dowels have expanded in place. I'm sure with a bit more effort, I could remove it, but not without damaging the table in some way. That being said, she(the boss) wants a table to go with the Farmhouse decor anyway. We sold the matching Ashley hutch last Fall, and will re-do the serving buffet to match the new decor.

IMG_0313.jpg

This is similar to her vision of what the new table will look like.
It will have a darker stained tabletop.
027.JPG
Of course, we'll retain our present chairs. She will recover the chair seats with a darker material and also repaint the chair's frame to match our breakfast table color(pic below), which is fairly close to Cream.

IMG_0312.jpg

Plans are to purchase 2 X 8s for the table top, distress the wood and apply a dark stain with a matt clear coat finish. The table frame(band) and legs will be pained. I'll bring a chair from the breakfast table to the paint store to scan for a color-match.

After lunch today, I'll move my wood-working table, from my barn to my shop, to prepare for this project.

To be continued.
 

·
Corndog Hater
Joined
·
11,687 Posts
All right another project.....After the coffee bar, I'm all eyes:munch:


BTW I really like that proposed look of the farmhouse table. I really need to start showing Mrs. CP this stuff. I want to upgrade all of our stained pine and oak moldings to wider white moldings, but she is unsure of mixing the white with med. to dark stained trim (door and window casings). That table is a great example of how the light and dark can complement each other and makes things visually "pop".:thumbup1gif:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
flyweight,

I build stuff for museums and would suggest getting your 2x8's from a hardwood/softwood/millwork supplier. You'll get better and more consistently dry wood. They may have 6/4 planks that would plane to about 1-1/4" or 8/4 that can finish out a bit thicker than 1-1/2". They usually have the capability to plane and cut to size. Spruce, pine, and soft maple are good choices. Pine will be the least durable (and inconsistent to stain), spruce a bit tougher, and maple is somewhat harder, yet. The supplier will offer you suggestions.

Buying 2x8's from the local lumberyard/homecenter with iffy drying will cause lots of headaches with cupping and warping. It will be more expensive to go to a lumber supplier but well worth it.

A tip for stabilizing wood furniture-make sure to apply the same finish strategy to the top and bottom of the table (or front/back and inside/outside). Same coats of same finish will help with the differential moisture absorption that causes warping and cupping.

There are metal dowel and socket options for the leafs at any woodworker supply.
Jay
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,718 Posts
Flyweight,

:munch::munch::munch: Should look great.
 

·
Chief Stick-picker-upper
Joined
·
11,263 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
flyweight,

I build stuff for museums and would suggest getting your 2x8's from a hardwood/softwood/millwork supplier. You'll get better and more consistently dry wood. They may have 6/4 planks that would plane to about 1-1/4" or 8/4 that can finish out a bit thicker than 1-1/2". They usually have the capability to plane and cut to size. Spruce, pine, and soft maple are good choices. Pine will be the least durable (and inconsistent to stain), spruce a bit tougher, and maple is somewhat harder, yet. The supplier will offer you suggestions.

Buying 2x8's from the local lumberyard/homecenter with iffy drying will cause lots of headaches with cupping and warping. It will be more expensive to go to a lumber supplier but well worth it.

A tip for stabilizing wood furniture-make sure to apply the same finish strategy to the top and bottom of the table (or front/back and inside/outside). Same coats of same finish will help with the differential moisture absorption that causes warping and cupping.

There are metal dowel and socket options for the leafs at any woodworker supply.
Jay

Jay, thanks for the information. I have on hand, aged rough-cut longleaf pine and cypress. The pine is over 80 years old and very hard. The cypress is ~50 years and much easier to work with. They would need to be planned. Also, they are only 1" in width. I'm wanting a more massive(2") finish for this table top. I going to shop the local lumber yards to see what's available in finished, dried rough-cut(2''x8"). If that doesn't plan out, I know a guy who has kiln-dried, rough-cut wood of different species.
 

·
Hey, I want a title too!
Joined
·
3,680 Posts
FW, have you seen Jimmy Diresta's farm table build?


might give you a few more ideas/thoughts.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,342 Posts
I'm all eyes

:munch::munch:
 

·
Chief Stick-picker-upper
Joined
·
11,263 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I wasn't sure I'd have time to post this. So, here it is.
I forgot to mention in my first post, this IS a low dollar build. The legs were purchased for $36, plus shipping.

Disclaimer:
I'm no furniture builder.

That being said, I don't know what certain pieces/parts of the table are called. For this project, I'll use the words in parentheses(- - - -) from the diagram below.

tableterms.png

Please excuse the mess in my shop. :hide: I'm retired and have no time to clean up. :mocking:

To make the band and stringers, I used repurpose Red Oak 2x4's(1.5"x3.5" actual). This lumber was removed from a office building remodel a few years ago. I have no idea why they were covered with a black finish. :unknown:
IMG_0398.jpg

After measuring twice, I cut the bands to the size needed and made a few passes with a belt sander to remove the black finish.
IMG_0400.jpg

Below is a closer view of the finish. Keep in mind, the bands, stringers and legs will be painted, so any imperfections will be hidden. Also, any part of the table that will no be seen, will be left as found.
IMG_0408.jpg

Being the wood was used, there were mounting holes drilled in random location. In the pic below, I applied wood filler to the holes. After the recommended drying time, the filler was sanded to meet the level of the wood surface.
IMG_0409.jpg

I flipped the bands over and used my Kreg R3 Pocket Hole Jig to place the screw holes.
IMG_0411.jpg

It's been a while since I've used this jig. I had forgotten how simple it is to use and how precise it is.
IMG_0416.jpg

IMG_0418.jpg

Once all of the pocket holes were drilled, I applied wood glue, positioned and squared the legs to the band. They were then clamped into place and Kreg pocket-hole screws were installed.
IMG_0413.jpg

After all four bands were retained to the legs, I set out to make the (4) corner braces.
IMG_0421.jpg

As you may know, corner bracings are available in different materials and styles. I already had the Red Oak, so I went that route.

Below is one of the (4) corner braces which is glued and clamped into place, ready for installation. Before the screws were installed, I ran a 2" wide ratchet strap around the entire table frame, taking careful measurement for squaring, then tightened the strap to hole it in place.
IMG_0419.jpg

To retaining the corner braces, I used four 1-7/8" decking screw(at each corner of the brace), along with two 3" furniture screws at the center. The reason for the decking screws is, in my experience, they are a tried & true retainer.
Besides, I had the screw leftover from a deck build I did for a friend. :good2:
IMG_0420.jpg

I then move on the the inside stringers to complete the table frame.
IMG_0422.jpg

This thing is solid!!! If the tabletop were installed, I could dance to The Mamou 2-Step on it. :laugh:

She isn't a Beauty Queen as she stands here, although she isn't complete either. If I get a chance tomorrow; and the temp allow, I'll apply primer to the framework. I'll also bring one of the breakfast-table chairs to Sherwin Williams for color-match.
IMG_0428.JPG

Next part of this build will be the tabletop, once I find the needed lumber.

Total cost so far, $59.

To be continued:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,178 Posts
Did the table leg come with that corner "chamfer-ed" to accept the corner brace or did you do that? :good2:

Looks great Cool White!! :mocking:

The step that would take me 4 hours and I'd be sitting down continually because I'd be dizzy is strapping it and walking in circles checking for square! :banghead: :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
314 Posts
Flyweight, “Please excuse the mess in my shop. I'm retired and have no time to clean up. ” There are no truer words to describe retirement for those who truly use and enjoy it. God Bless.:bigthumb:
 

·
Chief Stick-picker-upper
Joined
·
11,263 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
NICE flyweight. :thumbup1gif:
Thanks, Keith.

You can make me one if ya want.
Yes, I'd be glad to help YOU build one. All I will need from you is the material, a plane ticket(round trip, of course) and a fridge full of cold brewskies.
Note: No brew indulgence until after knock-off time. :mocking:

Did the table leg come with that corner "chamfer-ed" to accept the corner brace or did you do that? :good2:
Yes sir, they did. :thumbup1gif:

Looks great Cool White!!
Thanks, Titleist1.

The step that would take me 4 hours, I'd be sitting down continually because I'd be dizzy is, strapping it and walking in circles checking for square! :banghead: :lol:
I had no problem. My shop fridge was vacant of inventory. :mocking:

Nice work, Mr. Flyweight.
Thanks, RC.
Looks like you're pretty handy with Sketch-Up, too.:thumbup1gif:
Not really. I copied the diagram from the interweb.
I tried using Sketch-Up a few time with not very much luck(on my part). I was/am well versed in sketching diagrams with Corel Print House Magic(deluxe), but it runs on XP and NT only. I don't like using the newer CorelDRAW. I do have Virtual XP install on my tower CP to run my Corel Print House Magic​, but I haven't cranked it up in quite a while.

looking good! not sure on your plans for the breadboard ends for the tabletop, but may I recommend making sure you tongue and mortis them? it makes for a better table, because it allows the wood to expand and contract naturally, without compromising glue or screw joints.

https://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tips/techniques/joinery/breadboard
Thanks for the info. :bigthumb:
 

·
Chief Stick-picker-upper
Joined
·
11,263 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Originally posted by flyweight
“Please excuse the mess in my shop. I'm retired and have no time to clean up. ”
There are no truer words to describe retirement for those who truly use and enjoy it. God Bless.:bigthumb:
Throughout the years, I've heard this from other who have retired and sort of imagined their situation, but didn't fully grasp the magnitude until I retired.

:good2:
 
1 - 20 of 99 Posts
Top