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Unfortunately have to store my FEL outside this winter. Hope to build shop facility next summer. Should I put any kind of lubrication on the exposed part of the Hydraulic Cylinder to protect it?
 

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The cylinder rams have a coating on them to resist corrosion but I have seen several recommendations to apply a little Fluid Film to the exposed rods for extra insurance.
 

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I am in the same boat of storing my loader in a unheated pole barn. Just last week the temps were above freezing and I noticed the rams were practically dripping with water. I wiped them off and put a a thin coat of grease on them. I don't have fluid film around. My old 45 loader had this storage procedure. I plan to wipe the grease off before my first use in the spring.

Thanks for the info in the H120 rams having some coating on them. I noticed they have a grey hue to them verses the traditional look. Since my H120 FEL is new to me I have been studying both the paper and online manual on storage. I can't seem to find any information......
 

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The coating used on the cylinders is called "Black Nitride", and is supposed to be more corrosion resistant than typical chrome-especially today's chrome.
 
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The coating used on the cylinders is called "Black Nitride", and is supposed to be more corrosion resistant than typical chrome-especially today's chrome.[/QUOTE]

ESPECIALLY the "simulated chrome" used on 260 BH stabilizers....

stabilizer.jpg

...BH stored under a tarp tented and loosely tied down for "ventilation". No precipitation contacted these pistons and still they caught the rash. This is what happens when I DON'T READ the manual completely so I have no recourses with JD. It plainly states to put a coating of "grease" on exposed BH pistons. None of the other pistons sections that were exposed suffered any damage... I suspect this cylinder assembly was of foreign origin (not Orient). But certainly not worth a nitride coating in JD's book!.:munch:
 

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In a past Professional life, I dealt with the supplier JD used for their chrome plated cylinder rod material. I was on a first name basis with the President & VP and half the rest of the production & QA people in the plant that did the plating. They did a LOT of honing and hard chrome plating of my product. They were true masters of plating.

This black nitriding does seem to have one HUGE advantage over hard chrome plating, the treatment actually is part of the parent metal as opposed to being a coating on top of the surface. Where the cost savings comes in is the fact the black nitriding coats the rod surface plus hardens it. That's two separate operations on chrome plated cyl. rod material. Plus the black nitriding is a relatively low temperature operation compared to other hardening processes, only 1076 deg. F. The charts shown by some suppliers of the process don't really show that much of an improvement in corrosion protection and wear protection over hard chrome plating but the cost savings alone would be reason enough to adopt the new process.

Difficult to say if the cylinders or rods are imported. JD has their own cylinder mfg. plant in Moline, but they also buy "boat loads" of cylinders too.

PHIL D. - I'd let your wife's car sit outside before I'd let your tractor/loader set outside. A car can withstand weather many times better than a tractor. NOTHING ages a tractor faster than being exposed to rain, snow, sunlight, etc.
 

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In a past Professional life, I dealt with the supplier JD used for their chrome plated cylinder rod material. I was on a first name basis with the President & VP and half the rest of the production & QA people in the plant that did the plating. They did a LOT of honing and hard chrome plating of my product. They were true masters of plating.

This black nitriding does seem to have one HUGE advantage over hard chrome plating, the treatment actually is part of the parent metal as opposed to being a coating on top of the surface. Where the cost savings comes in is the fact the black nitriding coats the rod surface plus hardens it. That's two separate operations on chrome plated cyl. rod material. Plus the black nitriding is a relatively low temperature operation compared to other hardening processes, only 1076 deg. F. The charts shown by some suppliers of the process don't really show that much of an improvement in corrosion protection and wear protection over hard chrome plating but the cost savings alone would be reason enough to adopt the new process.

Difficult to say if the cylinders or rods are imported. JD has their own cylinder mfg. plant in Moline, but they also buy "boat loads" of cylinders too.

PHIL D. - I'd let your wife's car sit outside before I'd let your tractor/loader set outside. A car can withstand weather many times better than a tractor. NOTHING ages a tractor faster than being exposed to rain, snow, sunlight, etc.

I really like that idea. My car and tractor can stay in the garage and her car can go out. After she gets done snow blowing she Can clean her car off before going to work. I will of course have hot coffee for her when she is done. (On a side note only the FEL is staying outside, tractor is in garage)
 

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PHIL D. - I'd let your wife's car sit outside before I'd let your tractor/loader set outside. A car can withstand weather many times better than a tractor. NOTHING ages a tractor faster than being exposed to rain, snow, sunlight, etc.
Please report back on how this worked out for you.... errr... umm... I mean, let us know your new address. :laugh:
 

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Please report back on how this worked out for you.... errr... umm... I mean, let us know your new address. :laugh:
I don't know, I thought the hot coffee was a nice touch. :empathy3:
 

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Almost all of the smaller cylinders are purchased from suppliers. I have been in Cylinder in Moline and they all are big cylinders. Like too big for 1 man to carry.
Last time I was in "Cylinder" was 1978 when I was driving my little brown Package car.... and wearing a miserable itchy hot brown uniform. That was my favorite route to drive, first stop in the AM was at the J.C. Penney store my wife worked at.

I'll have to ask SON tonight where the cylinders for his plant come from. I'm sure his plant is either #1 or #2 in cylinder usage for the whole company.
 

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PHIL D. - I'd let your wife's car sit outside before I'd let your tractor/loader set outside. A car can withstand weather many times better than a tractor. NOTHING ages a tractor faster than being exposed to rain, snow, sunlight, etc.
Yeah...This is a plan that's not going to sit well....:tongue: I'd still like to get some loving for a few more years....:mocking:

Its a good idea tho...My SUV is the one that sits outside of course...The One is worth more than my Jeep.
 
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