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Discussion Starter #1
I don't wish to quibble between concrete or cement

Quickrete vs Foam

These will be most likely 4" round posts (3.75" nominal) in 6" holes - I may do 4x4 in 9" holes for certain parts but certainly not the large majority

I am leaning towards quickrete cause it is just what I know
Foam doesn't seem that much cheaper if at all
Foam will be sitting in wet ass clay - I live in the low country - you go down 2 ft, you hit water - dunno how that will work long term

We are talking roughly 2500 linear feet of fencing
 

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I don't wish to quibble between concrete or cement

Quickrete vs Foam

These will be most likely 4" round posts (3.75" nominal) in 6" holes - I may do 4x4 in 9" holes for certain parts but certainly not the large majority

I am leaning towards quickrete cause it is just what I know
Foam doesn't seem that much cheaper if at all
Foam will be sitting in wet ass clay - I live in the low country - you go down 2 ft, you hit water - dunno how that will work long term

We are talking roughly 2500 linear feet of fencing
I would use 3/4 minus gravel and tamp it good. Pressure treated posts rot out quicker when placed in concrete!
 

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Agree with the gravel. Use a ton of water when you tamp. I set eight 12' 6x6 posts for my composter in gravel. I bumped it with the 2032R almost immediately, it didn't even move.

The gravel will drain, the concrete and foam will not.
 

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Plain old dirt

99% of the fence posts I've put in don't have anything but very well tamped dirt around them. Very, very occasionally I've used something else but normally it's all dirt from the hole put back in the space but tamped very well. If the post is adequately sized and the hole is appropriately deep, that's all that is required in our area. It does mean taking the time to tamp the fill dirt all the way from top to bottom, which can be slower than simply dumping some quick crete in the hole.

Treefarmer
 

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99% of the fence posts I've put in don't have anything but very well tamped dirt around them. Very, very occasionally I've used something else but normally it's all dirt from the hole put back in the space but tamped very well. If the post is adequately sized and the hole is appropriately deep, that's all that is required in our area. It does mean taking the time to tamp the fill dirt all the way from top to bottom, which can be slower than simply dumping some quick crete in the hole.

Treefarmer
This is how I set all of mine too. So far, so good.
 

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i need to revise my previous statement.......fence posts of any size wood or steel we use hydraulic pounder to drive them.....the previous statement applies to poles and posts to tall to use a hydraulic hammer on......if you have enough i would think it would be worth considering renting a driver..or haveing them drove for you since this is the common way these days at least in our area.....i think 2500ft would be well worth the pounder option....i see adds on craigslist in our area for post driving per post all the time
 

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99% of the fence posts I've put in don't have anything but very well tamped dirt around them. Very, very occasionally I've used something else but normally it's all dirt from the hole put back in the space but tamped very well. If the post is adequately sized and the hole is appropriately deep, that's all that is required in our area. It does mean taking the time to tamp the fill dirt all the way from top to bottom, which can be slower than simply dumping some quick crete in the hole.

Treefarmer
That’s what I do as well. If you using a good treated post.

The pounder is a great idea, we did a lot of them quite a few years ago at our Lions park in the gravel parking lot. No mess and they are tight immediately.
 

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I don't wish to quibble between concrete or cement

Quickrete vs Foam

These will be most likely 4" round posts (3.75" nominal) in 6" holes - I may do 4x4 in 9" holes for certain parts but certainly not the large majority

I am leaning towards quickrete cause it is just what I know
Foam doesn't seem that much cheaper if at all
Foam will be sitting in wet ass clay - I live in the low country - you go down 2 ft, you hit water - dunno how that will work long term

We are talking roughly 2500 linear feet of fencing
If they are set deep enough and the dirt properly packed they will hold for decades. Many don't put them very deep and try to compensate by filling with concrete....they rot. I have been told that if you go extra deep and fill with gravel several inches to act as a drain then pack the dirt they will last even longer.
 

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Driver

i need to revise my previous statement.......fence posts of any size wood or steel we use hydraulic pounder to drive them.....the previous statement applies to poles and posts to tall to use a hydraulic hammer on......if you have enough i would think it would be worth considering renting a driver..or haveing them drove for you since this is the common way these days at least in our area.....i think 2500ft would be well worth the pounder option....i see adds on craigslist in our area for post driving per post all the time
I should also revise my post. We also drive posts when we have enough to make it worthwhile hauling the driver out and setting it up. If the ground isn't rock hard, it's a great way to go but nothing more frustrating than driving a post halfway and then having it splinter all to he. . Not only do you need a new post but pulling a driven post isn't easy. Since most of our fence work is repair, not full replacement the hand post hole diggers all show a lot of wear. So do I. . .

Treefarmer
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Driver - unless I can get one for a 3pt hitch - I probably won't have access to get one back there reliably

I will be using a post hole digger on the tractor and can easily use 8ft poles and I want them 54" up - so I can bury up to 42" of the pole easy enough. This should give plenty of stability.

Crushed concrete or gravel would be somewhat easier to deal with, I need a load to finish the driveway anyway, so having them bring extra to use on fence posts wouldn't be a big deal.
 

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Fence specs

The last new fence we put in had to be done to NRCS specifications which I believe called for posts on 10' centers. Line posts could be a combination of wood and T posts with minimum 5" wood posts every 3rd span. Line posts had to be I think either 30" or 36" in ground. Corner and brace posts had to be 8" diameter, 42" in the ground, I think. That was for 5 strand high tensile barbed wire.

I may be off on those specs some- it was several years ago but those are pretty close to what we do anyway. It was wet when we were putting the fence in and we drove posts where we could get the tractor to the spot, hand dug when we had to.

Our post driver is a 3 ph mount. You need a reasonable substantial tractor for it. It will take a 6" post down about 3-4" a pop in reasonable ground.

Treefarmer
 

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The last new fence we put in had to be done to NRCS specifications which I believe called for posts on 10' centers. Line posts could be a combination of wood and T posts with minimum 5" wood posts every 3rd span. Line posts had to be I think either 30" or 36" in ground. Corner and brace posts had to be 8" diameter, 42" in the ground, I think. That was for 5 strand high tensile barbed wire.

I may be off on those specs some- it was several years ago but those are pretty close to what we do anyway. It was wet when we were putting the fence in and we drove posts where we could get the tractor to the spot, hand dug when we had to.

Our post driver is a 3 ph mount. You need a reasonable substantial tractor for it. It will take a 6" post down about 3-4" a pop in reasonable ground.

Treefarmer

we dont use much wood anymore usually 6" steel pipe for the corners then weld in the braces .....we have a couple of drivers in the family...one is a Danuser with the grapple ...and one is a 500# hydraulic rock breaker with a post driver head....both work great we run them from skid steers due to they are much more manuverable to level them up.....used to use a 3pt Danuser type and it worked good just slower to line up and adjust.....one time messing around we used the rock breaker one to drive a steel T post sideways through a sycamore tree trunk like a nail......our issue is when we do hit bed rock if you are not careful you can wad up a metal fence post in a hurry...

frankly i cant imagine drilling and setting ~250 fence posts when driver technology is availible....my issue is more of clearing land and preping for new fence vs actual installation
 

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Much softer ground

we dont use much wood anymore usually 6" steel pipe for the corners then weld in the braces .....we have a couple of drivers in the family...one is a Danuser with the grapple ...and one is a 500# hydraulic rock breaker with a post driver head....both work great we run them from skid steers due to they are much more manuverable to level them up.....used to use a 3pt Danuser type and it worked good just slower to line up and adjust.....one time messing around we used the rock breaker one to drive a steel T post sideways through a sycamore tree trunk like a nail......our issue is when we do hit bed rock if you are not careful you can wad up a metal fence post in a hurry...

frankly i cant imagine drilling and setting ~250 fence posts when driver technology is availible....my issue is more of clearing land and preping for new fence vs actual installation
LOL, that rock breaker would drive a post even with the ground in some of our soil. We have few rocks but in spots have a marl type clay that's dang near impossible to drive wood into. Bed rock for us is about 1,000'-5,000' down or more.

The pipe would do it but that is much more costly in our area. The only place I know of with 6" pipe for posts is a bison farm, guy said they tore up everything else.

Every time I see a tracked skid steer on CL, the wheels start turning in my mind. So far instead of coming up "Buy", the result has been "Boy, that would be nice. . . BUT better not."

Treefarmer
 

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Pasture - horse, goats, chickens - no cows/bulls
Id use concert/cement on your H braces that you are going to tie off onto. Once you stretch that fence with a machine, it will move those H braces if you don't have any concert/cement. You could get away with just the clay soil on the in-between posts, but it will take some time for that clay to settle and make them sturdy. Id recommend a wood top railing for horses as they will stretch out and destroy your fence putting their heads over it on a daily basis.
 

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Id use concert/cement on your H braces that you are going to tie off onto. Once you stretch that fence with a machine, it will move those H braces if you don't have any concert/cement. You could get away with just the clay soil on the in-between posts, but it will take some time for that clay to settle and make them sturdy. Id recommend a wood top railing for horses as they will stretch out and destroy your fence putting their heads over it on a daily basis.
Electric dosen't stop them?
 
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