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You could also do that, depends on you situation.
I've had horses of my neighbors on one of my pastures for years and they have never damaged the ancient old barb wire fences. Of course these were Hawaiian horses if that makes a difference.
Of course the gate is pretty new but the rest of the fences areancient for the most part
 

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I've had horses of my neighbors on one of my pastures for years and they have never damaged the ancient old barb wire fences. Of course these were Hawaiian horses if that makes a difference.
Of course the gate is pretty new but the rest of the fences areancient for the most part
I don't think in his situation barbwire is going to work for goats, He's going to have to use horse fencing or goat fencing. A horse will lean their neck over that fence if there is no hot wire or board at the top to stop them. Ive personally have never had horses in an area with barbwire, only horse fencing, but I do have cattle with barbwire and they usually only try to poke their heads through the strands if you don't have fence stays.
 

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I don't think in his situation barbwire is going to work for goats, He's going to have to use horse fencing or goat fencing. A horse will lean their neck over that fence if there is no hot wire or board at the top to stop them. Ive personally have never had horses in an area with barbwire, only horse fencing, but I do have cattle with barbwire and they usually only try to poke their heads through the strands if you don't have fence stays.
I don't know what "horse fencing" is...
My take, you want to keep an animal in, use electric fence.
If they still get out, you need more strands, a ground wire, or a better fencer.

Neighbor back home even uses electric for his bison. Short of bison on the run (which nothing will stop) he hasn't had an issue. Granted, I believe he has 7 strands. 2 are grounds wires, 5 hot.

As for the posts, yeah, tamp dirt or just push them in.

We don't have a pounder, but just pushed them in with the loader bucket. Generally cut a wedge or point on the end.
If the ground is too hard to just push them in, try a small auger, like a 3" or something as a "pilot".
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I was planning on using the braided electric fence for the fencing itself on one pasture.

The other would be probably 4x4 or 2x4 hardware cloth with electric on the inside.
 

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I don't think in his situation barbwire is going to work for goats, He's going to have to use horse fencing or goat fencing. A horse will lean their neck over that fence if there is no hot wire or board at the top to stop them. Ive personally have never had horses in an area with barbwire, only horse fencing, but I do have cattle with barbwire and they usually only try to poke their heads through the strands if you don't have fence stays.
yes, goats require a different type of fence. In my case my fences were deep in blackberry and respected by all except deer. This year we had a storm that made a good portion of the county appear like it was a hurricane disaster area and my fences because of the blackberries were flattened. I'm in the process of remaking most of them.:usa
 

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I don't know what "horse fencing" is...
My take, you want to keep an animal in, use electric fence.
If they still get out, you need more strands, a ground wire, or a better fencer.

Neighbor back home even uses electric for his bison. Short of bison on the run (which nothing will stop) he hasn't had an issue. Granted, I believe he has 7 strands. 2 are grounds wires, 5 hot.

As for the posts, yeah, tamp dirt or just push them in.

We don't have a pounder, but just pushed them in with the loader bucket. Generally cut a wedge or point on the end.
If the ground is too hard to just push them in, try a small auger, like a 3" or something as a "pilot".
Horse fencing is a 2:4 fencing, for sheep's and horses. The vertical stay spacing is 2" and the horizontal spacing is 4". The idea is that goats can't get through, the horse hoofs will not get caught and they can't climb the fence. That's what horse fencing is. Electric is not the end all be all, it takes work to make sure works 365 when you have miles of it. I have both styles of fence. Both have there pros and cons. I would think you would want both in the case of horses.
 

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I was planning on using the braided electric fence for the fencing itself on one pasture.

The other would be probably 4x4 or 2x4 hardware cloth with electric on the inside.
Hardware cloth is essentially welded wire fence, which you can get for a decent price from a farm and ranch supply. Goats will stretch that out testing the fence.
Which ever way you go put in fencing on the inside.
 

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Horse fencing is a 2:4 fencing, for sheep's and horses. The vertical stay spacing is 2" and the horizontal spacing is 4". The idea is that goats can't get through, the horse hoofs will not get caught and they can't climb the fence. That's what horse fencing is. Electric is not the end all be all, it takes work to make sure works 365 when you have miles of it. I have both styles of fence. Both have there pros and cons. I would think you would want both in the case of horses.
:dunno: Growing up our cattle would walk through a brand new 4 string barb wire if they wanted what was on the other side. They were just a holes like that.
Put a hot wire on the top, no worries.
We converted everything to elec. 95% is 2 hot wires with a middle ground, and that's mostly to keep the calves from going between the hot wires.
As long as you keep springs in it to help when deer hit it, check the insulators, and spend the money on a quality fencer, we haven't had issues. YMMV

As for the horse fencing, no one around here uses that for horses. Just goats and sheep.
Horses get elec wire or more often the electric "ribbon" or cloth stuff.
 

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Hardware cloth is essentially welded wire fence, which you can get for a decent price from a farm and ranch supply. Goats will stretch that out testing the fence.
Which ever way you go put in fencing on the inside.
kinda like what i do, I use barbwire then add a four foot high fence inside depending upon what my use for that pasture is gonna be, Its often not necessary to use the expensive inside fence all around but it is in the areas they show an interest in breaching, Animals are unpredictable
 

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:dunno: Growing up our cattle would walk through a brand new 4 string barb wire if they wanted what was on the other side. They were just a holes like that.
Put a hot wire on the top, no worries.
We converted everything to elec. 95% is 2 hot wires with a middle ground, and that's mostly to keep the calves from going between the hot wires.
As long as you keep springs in it to help when deer hit it, check the insulators, and spend the money on a quality fencer, we haven't had issues. YMMV

As for the horse fencing, no one around here uses that for horses. Just goats and sheep.
Horses get elec wire or more often the electric "ribbon" or cloth stuff.
If there walking through barbwire then its because there is no fence stays and their putting their heads through the strands and walking through.
 

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We used 5 strand barbed wire for both cattle and horses. No issues. H braces were either telephone posts or rail road ties in sand. Just make sure you put plenty of stays so they can’t spread the wires. Fences would last about 30 years or so. T posts in between.


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Reverse experience

:dunno: Growing up our cattle would walk through a brand new 4 string barb wire if they wanted what was on the other side. They were just a holes like that.
Put a hot wire on the top, no worries.
We converted everything to elec. 95% is 2 hot wires with a middle ground, and that's mostly to keep the calves from going between the hot wires.
As long as you keep springs in it to help when deer hit it, check the insulators, and spend the money on a quality fencer, we haven't had issues. YMMV

As for the horse fencing, no one around here uses that for horses. Just goats and sheep.
Horses get elec wire or more often the electric "ribbon" or cloth stuff.
LOL, we're going the opposite way. A lot of our fence was electric and some still is. Tree limbs would come down and short out the fence and then the cows are where you don't want them. Gradually a lot of the wire is being replaced with barbed although we'll leave one or two smooth wires on the insulators if we do want to heat it up.

I've seen our cows stand and look at an electric fence with 6,000 volts on it, think about it a while and then walk through it. You could see her getting nailed but she decided the hay field was worth it. Try to get her to go back through it and nope, ain't gonna happen. Have to walk her the half mile back to a gate. . .

I'm not downing electric fence. It's a great choice when it works but a lot of our fence borders woods and we should walk it every day but don't get a chance to do that. The cows do walk it every day and they can tell if a fence is hot or not before they touch it.

If I build another fence along a road or property line, I think I'll try a high tensile woven wire fence with either a strand of barbed or one hot wire. I've never used it but have built fences with the old style woven wire which was pretty heavy, stiff and unyielding. Then new stuff is supposed to have enough spring in it to be easier to put up as well as being lighter. It does require very, very good corner bracing with large posts, good braces etc.

Treefarmer
 

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LOL, we're going the opposite way. A lot of our fence was electric and some still is. Tree limbs would come down and short out the fence and then the cows are where you don't want them. Gradually a lot of the wire is being replaced with barbed although we'll leave one or two smooth wires on the insulators if we do want to heat it up.

I've seen our cows stand and look at an electric fence with 6,000 volts on it, think about it a while and then walk through it. You could see her getting nailed but she decided the hay field was worth it. Try to get her to go back through it and nope, ain't gonna happen. Have to walk her the half mile back to a gate. . .

I'm not downing electric fence. It's a great choice when it works but a lot of our fence borders woods and we should walk it every day but don't get a chance to do that. The cows do walk it every day and they can tell if a fence is hot or not before they touch it.

If I build another fence along a road or property line, I think I'll try a high tensile woven wire fence with either a strand of barbed or one hot wire. I've never used it but have built fences with the old style woven wire which was pretty heavy, stiff and unyielding. Then new stuff is supposed to have enough spring in it to be easier to put up as well as being lighter. It does require very, very good corner bracing with large posts, good braces etc.

Treefarmer
That's my same problem, Trees are constantly falling on my fence lines. Ive be wanting to put more electric but barb wire is still cheaper for me.
 

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If they are set deep enough and the dirt properly packed they will hold for decades. Many don't put them very deep and try to compensate by filling with concrete....they rot. I have been told that if you go extra deep and fill with gravel several inches to act as a drain then pack the dirt they will last even longer.
I have cedar posts planted deep in just plain old dirt that are still serviceable. Some date from 1944. Can't use treated if your doing organic farming or ranching. I have switched over to tamped rock in the bottom then the post at least three feet in the ground filled with tamped dirt. In fact thats what i'm doing now except i cant find cedar in anything but 4x4. Not sure how they will hold up. chuckle..its funnny cause today i went out to take out three or four of the old posts but found them so solid i am just adding another post next to them and lagging them together for hard points. Rest will be T posts for livestock.

I think we all kinda tend to over kill and end up wasting money and time.
 

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For my fence posts I was thinking on using those 4x4 PVC sleeves cemented in. I was thinking of having them stick up slightly above grade. The beauty here is you could simply pull out a rotten or damaged 4x4 and slide another one in.

I've used these before with good success. There seemed to be minimal "slop" on the 4x4.
 

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LOL, we're going the opposite way. A lot of our fence was electric and some still is. Tree limbs would come down and short out the fence and then the cows are where you don't want them. Gradually a lot of the wire is being replaced with barbed although we'll leave one or two smooth wires on the insulators if we do want to heat it up.

I've seen our cows stand and look at an electric fence with 6,000 volts on it, think about it a while and then walk through it. You could see her getting nailed but she decided the hay field was worth it. Try to get her to go back through it and nope, ain't gonna happen. Have to walk her the half mile back to a gate. . .

I'm not downing electric fence. It's a great choice when it works but a lot of our fence borders woods and we should walk it every day but don't get a chance to do that. The cows do walk it every day and they can tell if a fence is hot or not before they touch it.

If I build another fence along a road or property line, I think I'll try a high tensile woven wire fence with either a strand of barbed or one hot wire. I've never used it but have built fences with the old style woven wire which was pretty heavy, stiff and unyielding. Then new stuff is supposed to have enough spring in it to be easier to put up as well as being lighter. It does require very, very good corner bracing with large posts, good braces etc.

Treefarmer
I'm in ND, we don't have trees! :lol:

Where we do, trees damage both electric and barbed, so no difference.
Yes, cows can tell for sure if it's hot or not without touching it. That's why it needs to be HOT when they are first put in the pasture. They learn where they are and respect the fences then, at least ours did.

I will never put up woven wire! While it is great fencing, the deterioration and how it becomes overgrown and into the grass/dirt just sucks. I've had to struggle to tear out too much of it that was half buried to make me ever want to install it!
 
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