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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm looking at buying a breaking (or turning as some may call it) plow for my 4320. I haven't been able to find through a Deere source locally what size plow the tractor will pull.

I've read to allow 1" of pan per PTO horsepower. In my case, figuring the 4320 = approximately 48 hp, the 4320 should pull a plow with 3 - 16" pans or the equivalent.

Of course, YMMV, depending on soil type, condition, weight of tractor, fluid in wheels etc. Dad thinks my tractor will pull it all right if it has enough weight to provide the traction needed.

Anyone with any experience or other thoughts?
 

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I have heavy clay soil up here. I could pull a 2-16 anywhere I wanted. I put on a 3-16 and could feel the difference, but I still pulled it in range B without stressing the tractor at all. I think my 4520 is 60HP. You will be fine with a 3-16 and might be able to pull a 4 bottom. I do have R-1's and I was in 4wd with the loader on. I also have 440 pounds or iron on the rears.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I also have 440 pounds or iron on the rears.
Thanks Brian for the reply. Are your rear tires filled with fluid also?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No. I am not a believer in fluid. I think I can get more traction by adjusting air pressure and running iron weights.
Interesting Brian. With my two rear tires filled they each weigh almost 900 pounds, according to the dealer. With the R4 tires filled, I have never had a problem with traction but I've never pulled a plow either.
 

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I have not seen anything to tell me that fluid in R-4's is bad since they are a very flat tire. IF they are like R-1's, I have seen demonstrations that prove you can get more traction and use less fuel with iron. The fluid in tires has a drag to it while moving and the way the fluid moves determines the shape of the tire.

Some argue over what one is easier to get moving or what ones roll easier once moving, but the real issue, with a radial tire, is that they cannot flex like they are supposed to with fluid. That causes a more harsh ride, it compacts soil, and it does not allow the tire to get a good contact patch with the soil. Again, this is all AG stuff.

Fluid is definitely cheaper and more economical than iron.
 
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