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My 1025r has turf tires that were filled by my dealer. I also purchased wheel weights for use in the winter while plowing. The dealer suggested filling the tires for weight while using the FEL. The majority of my use with the tractor is mowing. My soil is clay, and when I mow in some of the lower areas that are wet, it tends to sink and leave ruts. I recently saw a three point hitch suitcase weight rack by Heavy Hitch. I was thinking of removing the fluid from the rear tires and using the hitch system when I am using the loader. Does anyone have thoughts or suggestions?
 

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That’s a common way to provide ballast for loader work. It’s nice since it is easily removable.

Actually, ballast on the 3-point arms is more effective for loader work being the weight is behind the rear axle. Loaded tires are more for traction than ballast actually but that has been a debated topic....

For your situation removing the liquid in the tires would be a good move. Just remember to attach your ballast when you do loader work. That’s where an iMatch hitch is nice.

And just one word of caution - if you remove the liquid ballast in the tires you might find yourself stuck instead of leaving ruts.
 

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I have a Heavy Hitch weight rack. It is very well built, compact, and will certainly help with loader work. I also have a ballast box that is filled with gravel that I believe weighs more than the Heavy Hitch rack with weights. I also have the Heavy Hitch cart stand for the weight rack. I made a roll cart for the ballast box. I think that either of these would work well for you. The ballast box option might cost less. In either case, if you are storing your tractor indoors, the roll carts simplify attaching and taking off the weight, as well as assists in moving the ballast.
 

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I have the deere ballast box that I use when needed. I filled it with 500lbs cement. I have used my loader to lift some large logs. I also switched my tires to HDAP like on the 758 and have no trouble with traction during plowing.
 

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How much weight is in your rear tires ? I don’t think removing 1 - 200lbs is going to help much in reducing ruts.

I have a 1026 with filled tires and 2 sets of 50lbs wheel weights. I don’t notice any difference in ruts / damage to my lawn when the weights are off, so I now leave them on year round. I do notice reduced traction when the wheel weights are off the tractor. I have r4 tires .
 

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As others have suggested I would check the loader manual and follow the suggestions there. I recently purchased a 2018 1025R with an after market 4 in 1 FEL and the dealer said that filling the tyres with fluid would be sufficient ballast but that is not so. Moving across a fairly gentle slope the centre of gravity is pushed forward and downslope and stability issues arise without any load. I took the FEL off until I could acquire some weights and a fabricated bracket (Heavy Hitch are not sold in Australia). I have just started to use the FEL again now and the weight makes all the difference. Perhaps on flat ground you can get away with it but not on slopes. I think I would live with the ruts. My FEL might be heavier than the H120 at 355Kg but even so....
 

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Well, I know the common theme is loaded tires, but I never have, for reasons you describe.
Around here, Id have to stay off the lawn most of Spring and early Fall. This year it would have been all year.
Without weights, I dont leave too deep of a rut if its soft. You can see the tread pattern, but it fades fairly quickly.
Now, the one time I did have to venture across an area to get to a downed tree, with the backhoe on as ballast, you can still see the ruts a month later.

If you have soft areas, ditch the filled tires. This is why Im such a fan of cast iron weights. You can add or remove as needed.
You should have plenty of weight to not get stuck if you have grassy areas without the filled tires. Your dealer sure should have known better than to tell you that would suffice for loader work.
Heavy hitch makes several different brackets. If you want LOTS of weight, get the one that holds two sets of the 42# weights, which would give you 672#. You can also get one thats made with the bar the weights ride on mounted higher so that the big 70# weights fit it. In that case, you could end up with 560# plus the weight of the bracket and Imatch.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Lots of great advice. In defense of my dealer he did suggest the ballast box, but I was concerned at the time with storage. He advised I could try the wheel weights and the filled tires for light loader work. Now I have more garage storage space. I like the looks of the heavy hitch with 42# weights. Not sure how many weights to use.
 

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Lots of great advice. In defense of my dealer he did suggest the ballast box, but I was concerned at the time with storage. He advised I could try the wheel weights and the filled tires for light loader work...
A reminder; the primary purpose of proper ballasting is to provide stability - especially lateral stability. The front axle is on a pivot, as you add weight to the front of the tractor the center of gravity moves away from the solid rear axle and towards the pivoting front axle. Wheel weights, fluid filled tires and especially a ballast box will all serve to move the center of gravity closer to the rear axle.

Sure, if you are careful and the work is light you can get away without ballast. Don't become complacent though, that is when physics will remind you that there is a good reason for ballasting the right way. You'll be much safer if you get a ballast box (or heavy hitch).

As for removing the fluid in your tires, I wouldn't bother. It would be difficult to remove it all, and I doubt that the ~70lbs that you were able to remove would make a noticeable difference in the ruts it would leave - and it would make the tractor less stable when doing loader work.
 

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Lots of great advice. In defense of my dealer he did suggest the ballast box, but I was concerned at the time with storage. He advised I could try the wheel weights and the filled tires for light loader work. Now I have more garage storage space. I like the looks of the heavy hitch with 42# weights. Not sure how many weights to use.
You have to also remember that 8 42# weights are only 336 lbs, not near enough rear ballast for even moderate FEL work. If you go with the HH weight bracket that only holds 8 weights I would suggest 70 lbers, or simply get the weight bracket that holds 16 and buy a lot of 42 lb weights.


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The loader manual specifies ballast weights and options.
 

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I filled my tires myself and I am using the HH brackets. I can fit up to 16 42# weights on the back, but run with 12 + filled tires. I have some soft areas due to all the rain, and I can easily make mud. As mentioned earlier, I don't think removing the fluid from the tires would make very much difference in that. I like this HH setup because I can take the extra weight rack and stick it on the front if I needed to.

That said, I went fluid filled because I didn't want to mess with wheel weights, but time will tell if I change my mind. I suspect I'll hate the fluid filled the first time I have to remove a wheel for some reason.

 

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By the way, for those with 120R, this is the minimum ballast;


Minimum Rear Ballast

Option 1

Fluid filled rear tires

350 kg (772 lb) minimum (3-point hitch ballast)


Option 2

Three rear wheel weights per wheel

350 kg (772 lb) minimum (3-point hitch ballast)
 

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I filled my tires myself and I am using the HH brackets. I can fit up to 16 42# weights on the back, but run with 12 + filled tires. I have some soft areas due to all the rain, and I can easily make mud. As mentioned earlier, I don't think removing the fluid from the tires would make very much difference in that. I like this HH setup because I can take the extra weight rack and stick it on the front if I needed to.

That said, I went fluid filled because I didn't want to mess with wheel weights, but time will tell if I change my mind. I suspect I'll hate the fluid filled the first time I have to remove a wheel for some reason.

You just gave me an idea on something else to build for my fake heavy hitch!
If I were a smart guy, Id have made my fake heavy hitch taller to hold the larger 70# weights.
Maybe the next one. Or maybe Ill break out the plasma cutter and fix it. Or maybe Ill do neither and just build the extension to go in the receiver.
 

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The leverage of a 42 lb weight out that far on the HeavyHitch extension must help too, I would think. I wonder if there are any calculators for anything like that although I'm sure its complicated since the tractor has two fulcrums and the weight isn't evenly distributed.
 

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I wonder if there are any calculators for anything like that although I'm sure its complicated since the tractor has two fulcrums and the weight isn't evenly distributed.
Weight(force) x Distance from the axle = Moment. Just plug in the numbers for the different weights and distances and you can see how they compare against each other. "Moment" is the torque that the weight imparts on the fulcrum.

It is true that there are two fulcrums but the only one we need to be concerned about is the one at the rear axle.
 

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weights

i use a heavy hitch on my 1025R with 4 x 42lb and 4 x 70lb weights and that works good for the most FEL work i do , make sure you check around for used suitcase weights i got mine second hand and they where a lot less than HH or the deere dealer , my new 2025R will be in this week thinking about fluid in the tire for that due to the higher center of gravity but have never needed on the 1025R , heavy hitch is better than ballast box in my mind its more compact but it does cost more when you figure in the weights
 

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The Heavy Hitch 3 point weight bars rock!!! I have a JD ballast box and a Heavy Hitch 3 point weight bar and I never use the ballast box anymore.

Two reasons, the ballast box, when installed, hangs to low, so when pulling the tractor onto a trailer, the box drags. The other reason is, it is difficult to change the weight of the ballast box, the Heavy Hitch, just add or remove suitcase weights.

It is true, you do not always need maximum ballasting when using the FEL, but if you are going to do work with the FEL that includes maxing it out, you better have the maximum required ballast on the tractor because the "try it and see" method will get you in trouble.
 

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The Heavy Hitch 3 point weight bars rock!!! I have a JD ballast box and a Heavy Hitch 3 point weight bar and I never use the ballast box anymore.

Two reasons, the ballast box, when installed, hangs to low, so when pulling the tractor onto a trailer, the box drags. The other reason is, it is difficult to change the weight of the ballast box, the Heavy Hitch, just add or remove suitcase weights.

It is true, you do not always need maximum ballasting when using the FEL, but if you are going to do work with the FEL that includes maxing it out, you better have the maximum required ballast on the tractor because the "try it and see" method will get you in trouble.
I ordered that from HH, literally just now :laugh: But I opted for the one that will hold 16, just in case. For the same reason I'm just getting tired of the ballast box, when I'm turning the compost piles I can barely start to drive up the pile to back drag more down. This should be the ticket.:good2:
 
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