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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Doing some outside remodeling. Tore out the old wheel chair ramp from the previous owner, we're reclaiming the majority of the wood for our chicken coop. This uncovered the old Cesspool 100%, it was previously only half covered by the ramp structure. The house has a septic system now, installed when my neighbors mother lived here. It's apparently pretty close to the house I guess, because the 4" PVC clean out pipe/stack, is about 30" from the foundation. My neighbor, couldn't recall exactly how far out from the house, that the tank is buried. Anyone have any insight on how a clean out pipe is laid out, in relation to the actual tank itself? Like, would it be straight down to the tank, or would/could there be a run of pipe, parallel to the ground, then in to the tank, would there be any reason to do that?
The Cesspool had an old concrete pad that covered it, my neighbor who lived here as a kid said they used to bail it out every springs with rope and pales. He said it was his "favorite job to do" :laugh: Apparently the structure that supported the concrete cover, partially collapsed, so someone just drug the cover about 20ft away and left it there (we just moved it with my neighbors 4020, way to big for the 870), it's about 4ftx5ft and easily 6" thick. They poured a new cover with a steel lid, or purchased one preformed (most likely now that I think about it), and threw it over the top of it, rather then permanently filling it in. Why the hell wouldn't you just fill the thing in? You can clearly see the entrance tile is collapsed. Would there be any reason that the exit (liquid overflow) of this Cesspool, would be tied into the newer septic system? Perspective, the crushed entrance tile, is facing east (towards the house obviously), the exit pipe, is facing due west. The new septic tank is (i'm guessing), between this and the house, which is a span of about 20ft to the edge of the brick.

Would you just fill this in? I have the dirt piles to do it. That standing water in the pics, is our water table basically.
 

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I would probably get an excavator over there and do some digging an figure out if it is still connected to something.
Then I would deal with that, then have him bust up the concrete top, grub out as much as I could, have him haul it away, then fill it in with dirt. I hate leaving buried junk. It seems like it always haunts you later when you try to dig a post hole or bury a wire.

There is usually a clean out just before you leave a building. There should be inspection pipes or hatches in the septic tank. You will want to find it for sure....they aren’t exactly maintenance free:laugh:
 

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I hate leaving buried junk. It seems like it always haunts you later when you try to dig a post hole or bury a wire.
Amen to that.

Seems the PO of our place thought old brick was good "filler". I tried to dig a hole to plant a shrub for the wife and extracted a half dozen bricks in the process.
 

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It appears that you have a pretty straight forward filling process
Section 905
f) Abandoned Treatment Units. Septic tanks, cesspools, pit privies, aerobic treatment plants and seepage pits that are no longer in use shall be completely pumped. The floor and walls shall be cracked or crumbled so that the tank will not hold water, and the tank shall be filled with sand or soil. If the tank is removed from the ground, the excavation shall be filled with soil.

Some county public health office have a form to fill out to confirm it's decommissioned correctly. Here's the form from Boone County.
 

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The house has a septic system now, installed when my neighbors mother lived here. It's apparently pretty close to the house I guess, because the 4" PVC clean out pipe/stack, is about 30" from the foundation. My neighbor, couldn't recall exactly how far out from the house, that the tank is buried. Anyone have any insight on how a clean out pipe is laid out, in relation to the actual tank itself? Like, would it be straight down to the tank, or would/could there be a run of pipe, parallel to the ground, then in to the tank, would there be any reason to do that?
I doubt the clean out location has any significant relationship to the actual tank location. My septic tank is ~30' straight out in front of my house and I have a cleanout inside the house and one about 2' from the foundation on the outside of the house. The outside one is connected to a lateral line to the tank with a Y connector.

Would there be any reason that the exit (liquid overflow) of this Cesspool, would be tied into the newer septic system?
There would be no good reason to do that and a lot of good reasons NOT to do it. The last thing you'd want would be for teh septic tank to back up into an abandoned cesspool hole.

Would you just fill this in? I have the dirt piles to do it. That standing water in the pics, is our water table basically.
I'd fill it in but I wouldn't use soil. I'd fill it with sand.
 

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...at this point nothing flows into ...or out of it(other than ground water)....so it must be fuctionally disconnected...

if i were still worried i would put a cement plug in the entrance and exit......take i picture of the system....and measurements of the entrance and exit from a known structure like the house so if you ever needed to find it exactly you could...then i would fill it with whatever you have for fill .....i would probably either remove the top totally or crush it into 6-8" chunks and put it in the fill ...i would also probably knock the walls down a couple of feet ....fill it ...let it settle ...or run a lot of water on it to help it settle ....refill the top and plant grass ...

or use the hole for something else...
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Found the septic tank on the plot survey map (unfortunately, it doesn't show the leach field), it's about 12-14ft north of the brick cesspool, which puts it about 20-22ft Northeast of the house. Previous owners used that 4x5 concrete cover that my neighbor moved for me, to mark the septic tank access. I'm gonna come up with some other way to mark it, that is less obtrusive to the yard. Ideas? Maybe just leave it bare and grass covered, since I know the location of it?

I was thinking of breaking up both concrete pads that are on top of the cesspool, and knocking down the brick wall some, then burying it all inside it. Except that steel lid, I can use that for something ;) I'll have to look around my county website for some info, on their required procedures.
 

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Found the septic tank on the plot survey map (unfortunately, it doesn't show the leach field), it's about 12-14ft north of the brick cesspool, which puts it about 20-22ft Northeast of the house. Previous owners used that 4x5 concrete cover that my neighbor moved for me, to mark the septic tank access. I'm gonna come up with some other way to mark it, that is less obtrusive to the yard. Ideas? Maybe just leave it bare and grass covered, since I know the location of it?
Most people around here just grab a 12' x 12" cement paver at a big box store and set that in the ground over the access cover and then let the grass grow around it. If you set it low enough you can go right over it with the mower. I set our birdbath on top of my paver.
 

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Found the septic tank on the plot survey map (unfortunately, it doesn't show the leach field), it's about 12-14ft north of the brick cesspool, which puts it about 20-22ft Northeast of the house. Previous owners used that 4x5 concrete cover that my neighbor moved for me, to mark the septic tank access. I'm gonna come up with some other way to mark it, that is less obtrusive to the yard. Ideas? Maybe just leave it bare and grass covered, since I know the location of it?

I was thinking of breaking up both concrete pads that are on top of the cesspool, and knocking down the brick wall some, then burying it all inside it. Except that steel lid, I can use that for something ;) I'll have to look around my county website for some info, on their required procedures.
This is what I did...
The tank is about 4 or 5 feet below grade. You can get the cement man hole riser sections from the septic tank guy. They are about a foot tall and stack together to form the risers. The last riser is special to accept the plastic lid, and is secured by stainless screws. Then you can pump it out, inspect both compartments, and even climb in and do repairs to the baffles.
All without digging anything up.
The guy that pumps it out will be so happy, he will probably send you flowers:mocking:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
been a lot of septic tanks and cisterns "Found" by .....dump trucks...concrete trucks...big tractors....utility pole trucks....etc
Very true. When we were in Florida, working Hurricane Irma, a guy I know drove his squirt boom F550 into a back yard, and sunk it to the frame rails in someones septic. He got a day off without pay.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
This is what I did...
The tank is about 4 or 5 feet below grade. You can get the cement man hole riser sections from the septic tank guy. They are about a foot tall and stack together to form the risers. The last riser is special to accept the plastic lid, and is secured by stainless screws. Then you can pump it out, inspect both compartments, and even climb in and do repairs to the baffles.
All without digging anything up.
The guy that pumps it out will be so happy, he will probably send you flowers:mocking:

Good idea. I'll have to dig mine up and find out exactly how deep it is. I'm gonna do something along the lines of this. Can you roll your ZTR over the top of those?
 

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This is what I did...
The tank is about 4 or 5 feet below grade. You can get the cement man hole riser sections from the septic tank guy. They are about a foot tall and stack together to form the risers. The last riser is special to accept the plastic lid, and is secured by stainless screws. Then you can pump it out, inspect both compartments, and even climb in and do repairs to the baffles.
All without digging anything up.
The guy that pumps it out will be so happy, he will probably send you flowers:mocking:
I wish I could do that. My tank is only covered by about 2" of topsoil. The heat from it kills any grass I try to grow over the top of it. :banghead:
 

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Good idea. I'll have to dig mine up and find out exactly how deep it is. I'm gonna do something along the lines of this. Can you roll your ZTR over the top of those?
I raise the deck all the way up and just let the edge of the deck overhang a little, and go around it at a couple different angles. I think my striping roller would catch it pretty solid if I tried to go over it square.
 

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I wish I could do that. My tank is only covered by about 2" of topsoil. The heat from it kills any grass I try to grow over the top of it. :banghead:
Can you put more dirt on top and just slope it out?
 

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Can you put more dirt on top and just slope it out?
Not really. I ended up laying a bed of mulch and we just plant annuals over it every spring.
 

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About those septic lids

Someone asked, “Can you drive over those?”. Mine I certainly can; they are quite stout. It is possible to nick them enough to allow gas to escape. Do not do this! These puppies ain’t cheap! A few hundred for the three of them....but we don’t nick them anymore....
 

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You see these old abandoned cesspools used occasionally on the Murder Porn shows, like "Snapped" and the other 27 varieties on Oxygen, etc. They have had everything from lottery winners to former mother in laws found in them.......

I would knock the walls down and fill with sand. If that water standing in there is your water table, its very important to fill that in to avoid something bad happening to the acquifier from contamination. The sand, stone and earth is the natural filtration system and when they aren't there, there is nothing for that water to actually be filtered through, with the water standing in there.........Can you imagine how many people likely died building those old system by stacking the brick and having the walls cave in on them..........

All of this talk about cesspools and cisterns, reminds me of my screen name at one or two of the other tractor forums, the name is "ItShHappens"
Since I never go over to those other forums, I guess "it never does happen", at least on those sites from me......
 
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