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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Thought I'd update this thread after all of the helpful comments and in the interest of helping anyone else who is trying to figure out the current costs.

After all of the haggling, etc., we settled on the following:

1025R
120R
260B
JD Mech Thumb
Ballast box
60 month same as cash

Finish price was $21,900 delivered not including tax.

I feel pretty good about the final price and the MSRP went up a little in the interim.

The ballast box was a compromise to his having uttered a price he shouldn't have so I told him that I'd go ahead and get a cheap implement. It will be useful. He was a straight shooter and I appreciated that.

Anyway, got to go order that parhanna, some pallet forks, some hooks, and a hitch receiver.....you know how it goes!

Thanks all - I'll post again when I can contribute something useful and probably to pick your brains on things along the way.

Eric

-----------------------------------------

Hello community!

New member Eric here in Olympia WA. I'll try to be concise! Soon to retire and am planning for my more leisurely life! I've been circling-in on a SCUT purchase for a year or so and am ready to make the move. I've read a BUNCH but am hoping the experienced here will be willing to critique my choices and assumptions and chime-in on a few specifics.

I have 5 mostly sloped acres of wetlands and woods with a 350 ft driveway, ditches, culverts, rock walls. I'm "reforesting" the parcel with native trees and shrubs as it wasn't replanted when last clearcut about 50 - 60 years ago. I've been doing this with shovels, wheeled carts and brute manual labor for two years. I'd like to reduce the manual labor part a little! I have a pole barn/shop going up this summer so there will be accessory jobs surrounding that though I am not building it myself.

I've settled on the 1025R mostly because of the slopes I have and the need for a very nimble, gets-in-tight-spaces machine. I've got lots of projects on slate including replacing a driveway culvert, building/fixing rock walls, clearing ditches, trenching for hydrants gas/power lines, lots of mulch moving and the like. I don't "clear brush" generally as downed wood aids in my restoration efforts so most is left to become new soil and nursery trees. I see using it for snow removal 1 - 2 times a year max as we don't get snow often (and some years not at all) but when we do, it's a foot deep, wet, and heavy.

Cost is a big consideration so I'm trying to squeeze the value out of my purchase decisions as best I can. I can buy outright or finance. I've analyzed my needs and am pricing out this:

1025R with 120R and 260B -- MSRP for this is $26,397

I was interested in the 0% financing option until the salesman gave me two different prices for the above tractor: the 0% financing price of $24,697 and the "cash" price of $22,906. I'm a bit baffled about how they call it 0% interest but charge about $2000 to get that "free" financing! The difference comes out to about 4.7% interest when adding the additional $2K to the price then financing it. 4.7% is not 0% no matter how you do the math. I should add that in both pricing scenarios, he's "throwing in" a JD mechanical thumb for the BH which is something I will definitely be using with rock wall building and downed log placement.

What I don't understand is why there is a cash incentive and why I cannot get the "cash" price with the 0% financing. His response is that "zero percent cost money." This make no sense to me and sounds like mumbo jumbo doublespeak. What am I missing? The difference is equal to a good chunk of the cost of desired implements.

Lastly, my short list of implement essentials include:

  • Mechanical thumb for hoe
  • Toothed bar for loader bucket
  • Set of Edge Tamers for snow
  • Pallet frame with 36 inch forks
  • 2 inch hitch receiver at the front (which I can only find either in combination with the beefier Attilian pallet frame or with Ken's bucket bolt-on adapter but that bolt on option cannot take much weight given where it's mounted on the top of the bucket).
  • Post hole auger - I'll probably rent this as I don't see needing it after I put in my split rail fencing...or, buy it, use it and sell later.

You'll notice that I haven't identified need for rear ballast or three point hitch adapters/implements as I don't see taking off the BH very frequently to do what I need to do. The only exception to that is the post hole auger which I'll definiely need for about 100 posts but only for a single specific project. My driveway needs "maintenance" only about every 10 years or so. I won't be doing any mowing, tilling, box grading, seeding, spraying, etc.

Anyway, I think I'd get a LOT done with this set up!

I'd really be interested in hearing any insight of the pricing issue of cash vs 0% mentioned above and what sorts of implement combinations/solutions in the above wish list would be most cost effective and most efficiently achieved.

Thanks very much up front for engaging these questions! I am grateful!

I look forward to contributing and giving back on the forum as a green machine owner!

Eric
 

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The backhoe is 'good enough' ballast for pretty much everything, but it will limit the "very nimble, gets-in-tight-spaces machine" aspect because when you swing a tight turn its out back swinging with you and it might turn a three point turn into a seven point turn if things get really tight. Plus, you have to watch your hydraulic cables don't get caught on something while you're doing it.

The only other thing I would add since you're talking slopes is wheel spacers. Since I don't see a mower deck on your list, I think you can go out to 3" on the rear tires and that'll give you quite a bit more stability. Make sure the dealer or someone else "loads" (fluid fills) your tires too.

Lastly, I'm a fan of the 42" forks, but that's been beat to death on this forum.

As far as pricing goes...that happens with everything "0 percent." If you go to Ford and try to finance a vehicle 0 percent you lose out on rebates. 0 percent is a way of making us feel good about financing. Nothing is free.
 

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Just check around. Also go to sites like muttonpower.com and spec what you want. See what deals they have and many dealers will match them. I saved $1000 on a snowblower and related parts a few years when my dealer agreed to match the price of the LARGE dealers. If they don't want to work with, see how far it is to the next dealer and get a trailer. It is nice to have a friendly relationship with your local dealer, but they do not always reciprocate anyway. My local dealers are almost worthless.
 

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Welcome from southern KY!

Sounds like a nice list.

You should also consider wheel weights or tire fluid as well. I operator on slopes and my worst is almost 30 degrees. The wheel weight helps it feel better. Wheel spacers also help but the dealer doesn't sell those.

You may want some 42 lb suitcase weights to hang on the front if you use a post hole digger. These tiny tractors sometimes get pulled down by the auger and its hard to pull it out of the hole when the front end is in the air.

It doesn't hurt to shop different dealers. That price sounds high to me. I almost got $4000.00 off msrp when i bought mine. They sometimes don't tell you all the incentives. Some places have veterans discounts. They won't tell you, You'll just have to ask. The loader and backhoe should qualify for a multi implement purchase.

Ask for more stuff like free first service, imatch hitch, hat. etc. Its a negotiation. It shouldn't have to be that way but they can be more flexible.

778948


 

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Welcome from NW SD.

rob
 

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A big welcome to the GTT forum from Pennsylvania!!

good move on the PHD, I am lucky and have a great local rental center with compact tractor implements to rent. I have a rotary mower, land plane, and middle buster, I use those regularly. I have rented tiller, PHD, aerator, landscape Rake.
 
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I would bump up to a 2025. Rather than repeat all the things already posted, here is a link discussing the whys. One reason is your need for an auger, and post hole depth is limited by the smaller 1025R. I wouldn’t want to be doing the last foot of hole manually.

 

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Hello community!

New member Eric here in Olympia WA. I'll try to be concise! Soon to retire and am planning for my more leisurely life! I've been circling-in on a SCUT purchase for a year or so and am ready to make the move. I've read a BUNCH but am hoping the experienced here will be willing to critique my choices and assumptions and chime-in on a few specifics.

I have 5 mostly sloped acres of wetlands and woods with a 350 ft driveway, ditches, culverts, rock walls. I'm "reforesting" the parcel with native trees and shrubs as it wasn't replanted when last clearcut about 50 - 60 years ago. I've been doing this with shovels, wheeled carts and brute manual labor for two years. I'd like to reduce the manual labor part a little! I have a pole barn/shop going up this summer so there will be accessory jobs surrounding that though I am not building it myself.

I've settled on the 1025R mostly because of the slopes I have and the need for a very nimble, gets-in-tight-spaces machine. I've got lots of projects on slate including replacing a driveway culvert, building/fixing rock walls, clearing ditches, trenching for hydrants gas/power lines, lots of mulch moving and the like. I don't "clear brush" generally as downed wood aids in my restoration efforts so most is left to become new soil and nursery trees. I see using it for snow removal 1 - 2 times a year max as we don't get snow often (and some years not at all) but when we do, it's a foot deep, wet, and heavy.

Cost is a big consideration so I'm trying to squeeze the value out of my purchase decisions as best I can. I can buy outright or finance. I've analyzed my needs and am pricing out this:

1025R with 120R and 260B -- MSRP for this is $26,397

I was interested in the 0% financing option until the salesman gave me two different prices for the above tractor: the 0% financing price of $24,697 and the "cash" price of $22,906. I'm a bit baffled about how they call it 0% interest but charge about $2000 to get that "free" financing! The difference comes out to about 4.7% interest when adding the additional $2K to the price then financing it. 4.7% is not 0% no matter how you do the math. I should add that in both pricing scenarios, he's "throwing in" a JD mechanical thumb for the BH which is something I will definitely be using with rock wall building and downed log placement.

What I don't understand is why there is a cash incentive and why I cannot get the "cash" price with the 0% financing. His response is that "zero percent cost money." This make no sense to me and sounds like mumbo jumbo doublespeak. What am I missing? The difference is equal to a good chunk of the cost of desired implements.

Lastly, my short list of implement essentials include:

  • Mechanical thumb for hoe
  • Toothed bar for loader bucket
  • Set of Edge Tamers for snow
  • Pallet frame with 36 inch forks
  • 2 inch hitch receiver at the front (which I can only find either in combination with the beefier Attilian pallet frame or with Ken's bucket bolt-on adapter but that bolt on option cannot take much weight given where it's mounted on the top of the bucket).
  • Post hole auger - I'll probably rent this as I don't see needing it after I put in my split rail fencing...or, buy it, use it and sell later.

You'll notice that I haven't identified need for rear ballast or three point hitch adapters/implements as I don't see taking off the BH very frequently to do what I need to do. The only exception to that is the post hole auger which I'll definiely need for about 100 posts but only for a single specific project. My driveway needs "maintenance" only about every 10 years or so. I won't be doing any mowing, tilling, box grading, seeding, spraying, etc.

Anyway, I think I'd get a LOT done with this set up!

I'd really be interested in hearing any insight of the pricing issue of cash vs 0% mentioned above and what sorts of implement combinations/solutions in the above wish list would be most cost effective and most efficiently achieved.

Thanks very much up front for engaging these questions! I am grateful!

I look forward to contributing and giving back on the forum as a green machine owner!

Eric
Hey Eric,
We want it all! Right. Your gonna have fun with all that stuff. If you can pay cash , that’s the best deal. But at 84 months with the $1800 up charge I calculate that to be 2.2% interest rate, still very good. I know 0% for 36-48 months might be free money but when they have to wait for their money for 72-84 months there is a fee stuck in there somewhere. At 60 months financing, the $1800 difference represents 3% interest rate. $1800 difference in your two quotes. I went in with a firm budget, I could not get much movement on a 2025r tlb but got a lot taken off frontier implements, cheaper then anything I could buy elsewhere. I have no other dealers to compete for my sale maybe you do. Bottom line 2.2% for 84 months is still good don’t get hug up on the marketing ploys.I live in Nor Cal, so thanks for planting the trees. We need them!
 

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A big welcome to the GTT forum from Pennsylvania!!

good move on the PHD, I am lucky and have a great local rental center with compact tractor implements to rent. I have a rotary mower, land plane, and middle buster, I use those regularly. I have rented tiller, PHD, aerator, landscape Rake.
You one lucky man. I wished our rental outlets would rent 3ph implements.
 

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Welcome from Montana. I'm only going to comment on the receiver hitch. There are several fork frames on the market that have the 2" receiver built in (Titan is one). There's trailer ball adaptors you can put on your fork tines too as well as plain plates with nothing but a receiver hitch welded to it. The best setup I think is the fork frame type but the drawback is that you need to remove the forks to use it. That is a pain, but not too bad. That keeps the tongue weight as close to you as possible and the best visibility. The plate mounted unit would be next for the same reason but visibility suffers compared to the fork frame. Having hitches out on the ends of buckets and forks puts you at a disadvantage quickly weight-wise, although the fork tine method has the best visibility. The only thing I would caution you on is to ALWAYS move trailers in 4wd. The reason is because there are no brakes on your front axle. By keeping it in 4wd, even if the rear end were to come off the ground, the rear brakes are then coupled to the front drive and will give you some braking ability. Bad catastrophes can happen on a slope if the trailer weight lifts the rear of the tractor off of the ground to where you now have no way to stop. Another reason that if the rear end comes off the ground is that the front axle is on a pivot and that creates a tipping hazard quickly. So keep the hitch as close to the tractor as possible and loads low as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The backhoe is 'good enough' ballast for pretty much everything, but it will limit the "very nimble, gets-in-tight-spaces machine" aspect because when you swing a tight turn its out back swinging with you and it might turn a three point turn into a seven point turn if things get really tight. Plus, you have to watch your hydraulic cables don't get caught on something while you're doing it.

The only other thing I would add since you're talking slopes is wheel spacers. Since I don't see a mower deck on your list, I think you can go out to 3" on the rear tires and that'll give you quite a bit more stability. Make sure the dealer or someone else "loads" (fluid fills) your tires too.

Lastly, I'm a fan of the 42" forks, but that's been beat to death on this forum.

As far as pricing goes...that happens with everything "0 percent." If you go to Ford and try to finance a vehicle 0 percent you lose out on rebates. 0 percent is a way of making us feel good about financing. Nothing is free.
Thank you Zeke! I have considered the backhoe being a tail to wag around but I think I can make it work -- mostly it's what is needed in those tighter spaces!

With regard to wheel spacers - do they compromise any part of the axle integrity? I would think not but worth asking. I know double wheels has been thought to be dicey.

I'm leaning toward the 36 inch forks mostly after watching Tim's videos...I don't think that there is a correct answer here but I don't want to regret anything!

Thanks for your helpful post.

Eric
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Just check around. Also go to sites like muttonpower.com and spec what you want. See what deals they have and many dealers will match them. I saved $1000 on a snowblower and related parts a few years when my dealer agreed to match the price of the LARGE dealers. If they don't want to work with, see how far it is to the next dealer and get a trailer. It is nice to have a friendly relationship with your local dealer, but they do not always reciprocate anyway. My local dealers are almost worthless.
Thanks for your post. I'm shopping around as you suggest -- that muttonpower site didn't work for me though for some reason... I have 5 dealers within 60 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Welcome from southern KY!

Sounds like a nice list.

You should also consider wheel weights or tire fluid as well. I operator on slopes and my worst is almost 30 degrees. The wheel weight helps it feel better. Wheel spacers also help but the dealer doesn't sell those.

You may want some 42 lb suitcase weights to hang on the front if you use a post hole digger. These tiny tractors sometimes get pulled down by the auger and its hard to pull it out of the hole when the front end is in the air.

It doesn't hurt to shop different dealers. That price sounds high to me. I almost got $4000.00 off msrp when i bought mine. They sometimes don't tell you all the incentives. Some places have veterans discounts. They won't tell you, You'll just have to ask. The loader and backhoe should qualify for a multi implement purchase.

Ask for more stuff like free first service, imatch hitch, hat. etc. Its a negotiation. It shouldn't have to be that way but they can be more flexible.

View attachment 778948

Thanks a bunch, Jimmy! I watched the video and he talks about an upcoming buying guide in segments but darned if I can find it! Not sure it ever happened.

Yeah, fluid in tires and wheel spacers would be my stability upgrade if needed as I think that they're probably most cost effective.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Welcome from Central Georgia
Welcome from NW SD.

rob
A big welcome to the GTT forum from Pennsylvania!!

good move on the PHD, I am lucky and have a great local rental center with compact tractor implements to rent. I have a rotary mower, land plane, and middle buster, I use those regularly. I have rented tiller, PHD, aerator, landscape Rake.
Welcome from Central Georgia
Thanks guys!
 

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Welcome from Wisconsin.. Sounds like a nice setup you got planned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I would bump up to a 2025. Rather than repeat all the things already posted, here is a link discussing the whys. One reason is your need for an auger, and post hole depth is limited by the smaller 1025R. I wouldn’t want to be doing the last foot of hole manually.

Thanks Clyde! I had read that previously and It kept me in the one series camp. I only need to drill down 30 - 32 inches with the auger. I can't imagine that the little 1025 won't be able to handle that. Though I imagine having a bucket full of ballast would be helpful...
 

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Welcome from New York.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hey Eric,
We want it all! Right. Your gonna have fun with all that stuff. If you can pay cash , that’s the best deal. But at 84 months with the $1800 up charge I calculate that to be 2.2% interest rate, still very good. I know 0% for 36-48 months might be free money but when they have to wait for their money for 72-84 months there is a fee stuck in there somewhere. At 60 months financing, the $1800 difference represents 3% interest rate. $1800 difference in your two quotes. I went in with a firm budget, I could not get much movement on a 2025r tlb but got a lot taken off frontier implements, cheaper then anything I could buy elsewhere. I have no other dealers to compete for my sale maybe you do. Bottom line 2.2% for 84 months is still good don’t get hug up on the marketing ploys.I live in Nor Cal, so thanks for planting the trees. We need them!
Darn...I've never been good with that vein of math! My financial planner told me that if I have the $$ set aside for this and the cash deal is better, buy it cash.

I'm now leaning on just offering cash since the whole financing it thing is simply going to cost more. 18% off of MSRP is $21645. I think I'm going to offer $21000 cash flat for a simple TLB and see how that goes. I can clearly get all of my implements elsewhere for less and this will eliminate the strategy of getting that profit margin back up through the add-ons.
 
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