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After two winters I think I have finally finished the welding station. Here is a pic of the beginning.

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Not sure why they are sideways. I fixed them on my laptop, then they turn again here.

The air vents are standard floor vents for heat/AC. I bought a Harbor Freight 8" air mover fan with a 10' duct venting hose. I wired it up to turn on inside, I also used two 4' LED lights from Cosco. They are really bright.

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I also bought the welding curtain from HF. I used a 1" PVC electrical conduit as the hanger for the curtain.

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I mounted the plazma cutter at the top side of the booth. So it would be out of the way.

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I took advantage of the walls to hang my levels and other items.

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Now I can weld in the garage and not get the wife fumed out, not to mention myself.
 

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Not to be the fire marshal here, but you may want to give a little more thought to "If I were a spark, where could I hide?". My uncle burned down his shed with a welding spark that found its way into a cardboard box under the welding table and the fire started about 2 hours later. Details like caulking between the bench top and backer board are important. Or what happens to sparks up over the top. I also practice (at work and home) not welding or grinding right up until I leave the shop. I like to hang around for a bit just to make sure the fires are out. When leaving the shop, I turn off the lights and scan the area for glowing. Generally, I am welding in a drywall enclosed shop that is pretty fire resistant but occasionally I will get my wife or neighbor over for fire watch.
 

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Nice work. :thumbup1gif:


Also, what Jay stated. If it were mine, it would be lined and sealed with a non flammable material. Keep a water hose, or a bucket of water nearby, and also a updated fire extinguisher(or two).
 

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Not to be the fire marshal here, but you may want to give a little more thought to "If I were a spark, where could I hide?". My uncle burned down his shed with a welding spark that found its way into a cardboard box under the welding table and the fire started about 2 hours later. Details like caulking between the bench top and backer board are important. Or what happens to sparks up over the top. I also practice (at work and home) not welding or grinding right up until I leave the shop. I like to hang around for a bit just to make sure the fires are out. When leaving the shop, I turn off the lights and scan the area for glowing. Generally, I am welding in a drywall enclosed shop that is pretty fire resistant but occasionally I will get my wife or neighbor over for fire watch.
Agreed on both of your recommendations. I have two fire extinguishers in the shop at all times. The panel you see on both sides are firewall material you use for behind woodstoves. It is like a concrete material bought in small panels from Home depot. All cracks have been sealed except the ones on the side of the table. I am going to use mortar compound to seal that area. As for the air plenum vents I am going to line those holes with stainless steel mesh, to retard any sparks that may enter that area.

I never contemplated a bucket of water, but I will add that to my arsenal of fire fighting equipment. Thanks for the tips, I to am always afraid of fire in the garage. I usually do my welding outside and do not do a lot of welding. But when I do and the weather just does not cooperate this will be my go to place.

I started this project because I was in the garage last winter using the plazma cutter and noticed that the garage filled out with smoke so bad wife started coughing. I stopped, opened both bay doors and turned the fane on. Weather was bad, temps in the teens with wind. I decided right then to fix the problem.
 

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Agreed on both of your recommendations. I have two fire extinguishers in the shop at all times. The panel you see on both sides are firewall material you use for behind woodstoves. It is like a concrete material bought in small panels from Home depot. All cracks have been sealed except the ones on the side of the table. I am going to use mortar compound to seal that area. As for the air plenum vents I am going to line those holes with stainless steel mesh, to retard any sparks that may enter that area.

I never contemplated a bucket of water, but I will add that to my arsenal of fire fighting equipment. Thanks for the tips, I to am always afraid of fire in the garage. I usually do my welding outside and do not do a lot of welding. But when I do and the weather just does not cooperate this will be my go to place.

I started this project because I was in the garage last winter using the plazma cutter and noticed that the garage filled out with smoke so bad wife started coughing. I stopped, opened both bay doors and turned the fane on. Weather was bad, temps in the teens with wind. I decided right then to fix the problem.
:thumbup1gif: Good reminder for me of many of the possible dangers associated with welding inside . . . thanks!
 

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As an amateur welder, I love that you have a dedicated space to work. As a firefighter, I'm terrified of the use of combustibles in the construction. :laugh:

Good points have already been made, and you seem to be listening, so good on you. My welding area is in an outbuilding, too. I lined the entire room I weld in with pole barn steel, and I have a wifi camera in there that I check like a crazy person periodically after I weld.
:bigthumb:
 
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