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We've been struggling with the idea of adding a FEL to the 2150. The loaders are very expensive, and the specs didn't quite guarantee the lift capacity that we need. Well, the other day we ran across a deal that was too good to pass up. It's an early 70's model Case W14. It came with forks and a huge bucket. This machine will be great for moving bulk material around the farm, but its most important chore will be unloading pallets of granite tombstones from the rear of enclosed haulers.

Hope you guys have a good Sunday! :bigthumb:

IMG_20171104_165539469.jpg
 

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When are you going to tell us about your new (to you) dozer? Most importantly, is it ready for me to borrow? :mocking:
 

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Very cool! Is Jason going to rebuild that too? If so I think he'll need a bigger garage :mocking:
 

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We had a couple of them long ago at PennDot - very capable. You just have to watch where the rear end is before backing up. Being you are sitting on the front half instead of the rear (all “normal” loaders) the rear will get sideways on you without knowing it. Always look back where it is before backing up.

Also they can get stuck against a wall. We would use them in salt bins. If you were going in right next to the wall and spun a little you couldn’t get yourself back away from the wall.
 

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When are you going to tell us about your new (to you) dozer? Most importantly, is it ready for me to borrow? :mocking:
The dozer is a late 80's Case 450C Long Track Crawler Dozer. It has 5900 hours and we bought it from a recently retired local contractor who purchased the machine new. He had a staff mechanic and an operator, so he didn't run the dozer, but he kept it serviced - and it's had a top-end engine rebuild. We've replaced nearly every hose on the machine. I think that the firm that owned this dozer was big enough that they had properly sized equipment for each chore, so they likely didn't overwork this machine. So, when we had it moved here this April, being largely inexperienced, we pushed its limits and have systematically busted nearly every hose on the tractor. We've rebuilt 3 out of the 5 cylinders. We also grenaded a u-joint, which caused the driveshaft to destroy everything within reach. But we've gotten past all that, and we're now using the dozer more than we're repairing it. I'm getting fairly good at operating it - but by no means would I ever desire to run one of these things for 8hrs/day. But for farm cleanup and chores - it's great! It's +/- 65 HP 4 cylinder Cummings, 6 way blade, stick steering (which is the WEIRDEST thing to get used to!). We should have gotten one of these long ago. DieselShadow, you can borrow it any time you want! But we have no way to transport it. Weighing in at around 12k#, we decided that's it's actually easier to NOT have a trailer that will move it.
 

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Very cool! Is Jason going to rebuild that too? If so I think he'll need a bigger garage :mocking:
:laugh::laugh::laugh: KennyD, I would love to work on another project with Jason! So, I probably shoulda got a JD loader, but you take what you can get. This old loader is so worn out that I'm not sure that it would be worth the trouble. Leaking cylinders, sloppy center pivot pins, NO BRAKES, tires are shot, gauges are shot, cab windows are non-existent. The engine shut-off is a manual pull-cord next to the injector pump. You can't shut it off from the seat - you must be on the ground, standing next to the engine in order to access the shutoff cable. But the old engine seems reliable, the 4wd works, and the lift arm mechanism seems to function properly. Maybe you guys can direct me to some info on an "air-shift hydraulic transmission"? The gear selector has Reverse, Neutral, Forward Lo, and Forward Hi. The machine definitely has an on-board air compressor that runs while the main engine is running. The fellow that I bought the tractor from said that gear changes are made by air. I've never heard of this - just wanting to find more info. The W14 was manufactured by Case from the early 70's until around 1990. I'm pretty positive that this is a very early model, but I cannot find a data tag or serial number anywhere. I need to order a TSM and an Operators Manual, but the manual revisions are differentiated by serial number. Any advice from folks knowledgeable on Case equipment would be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
We had a couple of them long ago at PennDot - very capable. You just have to watch where the rear end is before backing up. Being you are sitting on the front half instead of the rear (all “normal” loaders) the rear will get sideways on you without knowing it. Always look back where it is before backing up.

Also they can get stuck against a wall. We would use them in salt bins. If you were going in right next to the wall and spun a little you couldn’t get yourself back away from the wall.
Thanks for the operating advice, CoalTrain. It is certainly a little odd to steer - especially while backing! Our youngest daughter, who will be 15 next month, came home the day we got the loader and said "When can I drive that, Dad?" It's a little tricky without brakes, but I think that she'll catch on!

Question CoalTrain: did you ever operate one of these going uphill, or only on flat ground? The reason I ask is that this one slows tremendously while climbing - wondering if this is normal, or indicates a problem?

This sucker weighs nearly 15,000 pounds. It's the heaviest and the slowest machine that we have. But if it will move loaded pallets, it will be my favorite - as it will potentially save me more work than any of the other tractors.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The first chore for this machine is unloading hay, but I need help fitting a hay spear to the lift arms. Is there possibly a ready-made adapter, or will this need to be a custom fab accessory?
 

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Measure the distance between the top of the top rail for your forks and the bottom of the bottom rail. That’ll tell you if you have a set of standard forks. If so, I’ll bet you can find a spear that mounts directly to your fork frame. If their not standard, you’ll probably have to fab something up.
 

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Thanks for the operating advice, CoalTrain. It is certainly a little odd to steer - especially while backing! Our youngest daughter, who will be 15 next month, came home the day we got the loader and said "When can I drive that, Dad?" It's a little tricky without brakes, but I think that she'll catch on!

Question CoalTrain: did you ever operate one of these going uphill, or only on flat ground? The reason I ask is that this one slows tremendously while climbing - wondering if this is normal, or indicates a problem?

This sucker weighs nearly 15,000 pounds. It's the heaviest and the slowest machine that we have. But if it will move loaded pallets, it will be my favorite - as it will potentially save me more work than any of the other tractors.
As they get old and wear out the transmission does also. It doesn’t surprise me f it couldn’t climb a hill at all.

We used them on totally flat paved areas to load trucks. You had to get a run to go into a pile to be able to get a full bucket. When they were finally phased out and we got new Deere or Kumatsu loaders the difference was amazing. The old Case could not even spin the tires going into a pile - with the new loaders you had to learn quickly to feather the throttle so you wouldn’t dig holes with the tires.

The steering is jerky by nature I think. Even if the bushings are good it is still jerky - to the point of giving your neck a workout.

It is what it is. A loader like that is such a useful tool. You’ll just have to get used to its limitations.
 

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We had a couple of them long ago at PennDot - very capable. You just have to watch where the rear end is before backing up. Being you are sitting on the front half instead of the rear (all “normal” loaders) the rear will get sideways on you without knowing it. Always look back where it is before backing up.

Also they can get stuck against a wall. We would use them in salt bins. If you were going in right next to the wall and spun a little you couldn’t get yourself back away from the wall.
Lol
I was gonna say the same thing about those Case loaders.
I worked for the .gov for a few years and we had W24's.
Many a time after picking up something really heavy you would go to back up and the tail section would be jacked 90 degrees without even realizing it. lol:laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Measure the distance between the top of the top rail for your forks and the bottom of the bottom rail. That’ll tell you if you have a set of standard forks. If so, I’ll bet you can find a spear that mounts directly to your fork frame. If their not standard, you’ll probably have to fab something up.
It measures 19 7/8" from the bottom of bottom rail to the top of top rail.
 

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The folks at hayspear.com offer a class II hay spear. They quoted a class III version for $180 plus ~&60 freight. $240 sounds like a fair price to me, what says you?
Sounds fair to me!

You could weld spear mounting sleeves in the corners of your carriage, slide the spears in when you need them and out when you don’t. I’d prefer a two spear setup anyway.
That is a great idea Blake, Jason needs to get a engine driven welder so can do this mod on-site.

Two of these would be perfect:

https://hayspear.com/hay-bale-spear-33-cross-bolt-1-5-8-dia-heat-treated-fluted/

There are a few others on this page:

https://hayspear.com/hay-bale-spears-spring-loaded-gate-latches/
 

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Discussion Starter #20
You could weld spear mounting sleeves in the corners of your carriage, slide the spears in when you need them and out when you don’t. I’d prefer a two spear setup anyway.
Two spears is an excellent idea! It will definitely improve productivity - considering how slowly this machine moves :laugh: I suppose the sleeves could be set back enough so that the forks would still be fully adjusted or removed, and still be able to access the spear cross bolt.
 
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