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OK, this is sort of out of no where but... I'd never really thought much about it but my B-I-L gave me a trash pump that he had sitting around. I played with it a little and got it running. For the time being, it's pushing water to 15 tripod sprinklers around the yard and garden.

I have a couple of acres surrounded by a thousand or so acres of woods. There are no fire hydrants in the neighborhood and likely never will be. There is a "fire pond" down the road and I do have a swimming pool.

I'm just curious if anyone has setup anything (or dealt with something) like this. Is there any point in buying a fire fighting nozzle and scrounge up a couple hundred feet of hose? Of is the idea of fending off a brush fire just a pipe dream? I think I can collect everything that would be needed for a basic setup for short $$$ over time (I'm not in any rush!) but is it worth even trying?
 

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Having a pond and a pool without a way to use the water is like having ammo and no gun.

Sometimes you run, sometimes you fight, but only if you have something to fight with.

If you can find the stuff for a few dollars, I'd do it.
 

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It depends on the situation. Authorities will always tell you to evacuate. Its amazing how much water you can run thru fighting a fire, in windy/dry conditions a swimming pool would be a drop in the bucket. The ground you soaked would dry out in minutes in a raging forest fire driven by wind. Flying embers can start multiple fires that you wouldn't be able to all put out.

What it would be handy for is keeping a smaller fire at bay while the authorities respond, such as a fire in your shop contained and not spreading to the house.

If you think you are going to protect your home if those thousand of acres is on fire and being pushed by a wind(like Washington is now) you are probably going to die of smoke inhalation before you even get the trash pump going and even if you did get it going the wind/heat would cause the water evaporate before it even hit the ground.
 

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The question is what type of fire are you fighting?

If you are fighting a simple grass fire, you can fight this with a good water sprayer that is a water tank and 12v sprayer on a tractor. If you are trying to fight a forest fire with a lot of trees and brush that are going up in flames, the solution is “get out of dodge”!

I have done my fair share of firefighting over the years, a grass fire gets hot, when you start adding brush it starts getting pretty unbearable and pretty difficult to fight, if you are surrounded by a true forest fight fire the overall heat and fire will suffocate you and roast you as it surrounds your property.

Hose to quickly wet down things before you leave to decrease wind ash dropping a hot ember on you place and starting trouble your can do that.

just my 2cents:unknown:
 

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The question is what type of fire are you fighting?

If you are fighting a simple grass fire, you can fight this with a good water sprayer that is a water tank and 12v sprayer on a tractor. If you are trying to fight a forest fire with a lot of trees and brush that are going up in flames, the solution is “get out of dodge”!

I have done my fair share of firefighting over the years, a grass fire gets hot, when you start adding brush it starts getting pretty unbearable and pretty difficult to fight, if you are surrounded by a true forest fight fire the overall heat and fire will suffocate you and roast you as it surrounds your property.

Hose to quickly wet down things before you leave to decrease wind ash dropping a hot ember on you place and starting trouble your can do that.

just my 2cents:unknown:
I have to agree with the two previous posters.. keep the pump for your grass watering or garden, any more than that get out quickly Jim.. Even Firefighters can have an issue with forest fires and they have the proper equipment.. Your house can be rebuilt but you??? I just lost a good friend the other day because of a propane explosion with a furnace change (you may have seen it on the news it was in New Braintree),, if he had just left the house he would be alive today.. He managed to get the fire out somehow and get into the pool in the back yard because he was burned over 80% of his body and died two days later.. Leave fire fighting to the pros.. and save your own life.
 

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I have been running into buildings everyone else has been running out of for 40 years now. That being said Wildland firefighters are a specialized and highly trained and psychotic group. I would not even dream of doing what they do, and most of the time they do not have water to do it with. (pick, AX and shovel) so even with their very intense training we still lost ANOTHER batch this past week in Ca. so protect you and yours by GETTING OUT. Material things can be replaced.
 

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You'll run in to fitting problems also. FF stuff isn't the same size and thread pitch as what you can buy off the shelf...and because it's for fire fighting, it costs lots more.
 

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Good friend is a volunteer fireman, has been for ten years now. As his "day job", he designs and sells fire fighting equipment. He told me the last fire he was at their pumper truck was pushing 100,000 gallons per hour. I'm surprised their tank trucks kept up.

Go ahead and equip yourself to combat a fire, but if a forest fire comes along, RUN!
 

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Lots of experience unfortunately

We have had several fires in our area and I've learned to get ready. The forestry guys love my set up and they don't even have to set up stuff to try and save my place. It is winter with several feet of snow so I can't get good pics but I'll try and describe. On the end of my barn and garage and house I ran 3/4" PVC up to the exterior wall to the eves (secured with pipe straps) and up over the top(takes a few elbows and short pieces). I have a metal roof. Along the ridge cap I ran PVC and secured it with pipe straps screwed into the metal ridge cap. Every 10' I installed a Tee pointing up. On that tee I have a one foot piece with a rain bird sprinkler head. At the end of each building near the ground is the connection for a garden hose. I use 3/4" garden hose running to all three buildings. I made a manifold that splits off from my pump output so I can hook up 4 hoses. Three go to the buildings and one for general use. I have an 18' x 5' above ground pool between the barn and garage and a pond behind that. The rain gutters run into it to help keep the pool full. Darn thing holds over 8,000 gallons of water. When the fires got closer and they were looking at evacuating us I ran one tractor with a brush hog around the place to knock down fuel and then followed it with the other tractor with the set of discs. It made a nice fire break fairly quick. I fire up the pump and make sure my 15 gallon external fuel supply is hooked up. When it gets pumping good the sprinklers cover the house, barn, and garage with a large circle of water. It will run for about 20 hours. It was not terribly expensive but has proven itself three times. (once was too often). Nice thing is when the threat is over you can disconnect the hoses and the system drains so no freezing.
My neighbor has set up the same system and also has it along his back fence. He's set up his rainbirds so they soak an arc out and away from his fence. It is set up permanently and he just hooks up a hose to the house, barn, fence and leaves if he has to. We are way outside any fire protection district so taking care of our own stuff is on us. I devised this system out of necessity and wanted it mounted permanently so in a rush all I had to do was hook up and fire up the gas pump (electricity for the house pump is the first thing to go out in a forest fire). When everything hits the fan it's nice to have the toilet paper ready....
It's the off season. You can get tremendous deals on those big aboveground pools. You can get all your supplies payday to payday during the winter and put it all together in the spring. Much less painful than buying it all on one payday in the spring when your trying to do everything else to (get the garden going, get ready for fishing etc)
 

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I have a Honda WX15 aluminum gas powered pump. The 1&1/2" high pressure hose kit I bought with it came with a red plastic nozzle. Thought it was a cheep toy until the first time I used it. You could definitely put a hurting on a small fire with it. However the pump takes about two minutes to prime. But when it does look out! You better be holding on the hose.
I do have it listed for sale on the forum. Hint hint
 
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