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1996 JD 955. 2017 z355e.
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello fellas,
As I stated in my earlier intro post I have been on this site for quite some time learning things about my new to me tractor. I live in northern IL and it's about to get cold. Sometimes at or under 10 degrees give or take. I'm running 15-40 in there currently as that's what the tractor was running for the past 20+ years in Texas. I'm sure there is a thread, but I'm not sure, I couldn't see anything. Should I switch the oil to a thinner oil for my winter plowing I'll be doing with it? I did purchase some hot shots winter anti gel. Hope that's decent stuff, will be adding that when I full the next can up

Also more important.....how do I search for said topic/ question about oil etc.?
Edit: unfortunately she lives in a un heated barn.

Thanks in advance. I appreciate any help as I get familiar with this site. I don't use or have any social media crap.
 

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If it’s kept in an unheated location I’d go with thinner oil. What does your owners manual recommend? I run Rotella T6 5w40 year round. It starts much easier and quieter in cold temps.
 

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1996 JD 955. 2017 z355e.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If it’s kept in an unheated location I’d go with thinner oil. What does your owners manual recommend? I run Rotella T6 5w40 year round. It starts much easier and quieter in cold temps.
Wasn't sure if the manual was out dated. Lot has changed in 25 years I imagine. Lol.
Thanks for your recommendation!
 
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simple answer......15-40...5-40....0-40 ....are all 40wt oil .....so perform the same when at opperating temperature......the lower front numbers are cold flow numbers so will help with starting and flow when the engine is cold.......below 40deg storage temp i highly recommend 5-40 or 0-40 to help starting and cold oil flow .......i run 5-40 synthetic in all my machines in missouri
 

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1996 JD 955. 2017 z355e.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
simple answer......15-40...5-40....0-40 ....are all 40wt oil .....so perform the same when at opperating temperature......the lower front numbers are cold flow numbers so will help with starting and flow when the engine is cold.......below 40deg storage temp i highly recommend 5-40 or 0-40 to help starting and cold oil flow .......i run 5-40 synthetic in all my machines in missouri
Just unfamiliar as far as the unit being 1996 if synthetic is okay? I've read Rotella t6 5-40 multiple times now! so I'm assuming that'd be a safe bet in the 5-40 weight.
Wife finally let me get a tractor to go along with the JD 355 zero turn I've had since new. so I just want to take care of this puppy, prob be the only one I'll get lmao.
 

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1996 JD 955. 2017 z355e.
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It’s gonna get colder than that!

And welcome to Illinois!

View attachment 811969
Lol thanks!! I've always lived in IL unfortunately. I purchased the tractor out of Texas and shipped it here. I know it can get damn cold lol. Wish I had a block heater. I think since the tractor came from Texas they never opted for the block heater option on initial purchase. Is it a simple install? Anybody know lol?
 
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Lol thanks!! I've always lived in IL unfortunately. I purchased the tractor out of Texas and shipped it here. I know it can get damn cold lol. Wish I had a block heater. I think since the tractor came from Texas they never opted for the block heater option on initial purchase. Is it a simple install? Anybody know lol?
fwiw ....i use rotella t6 5-40 on all my tractors new or old (makes a huge difference in cold starting) brand really doesnt matter just use diesel truck rated oil rotella has a good reputation and is lower cost with rebates so i keep it stocked up

moving to colder weather you will also need to treat your fuel for Geling

you also need to obviously check your coolant freeze rating

and if you have fluid in your tires you need to know its freeze rating

i also have a simple battery maintainer hooked up to my tractor batteries and i just keep it plugged in when parked in cold weather

all of my stuff has the factory heater option ...either block heater or air intake heat .....you can usually buy a universal after market coolant heater that will plumb into your lower radiator hose to keep the coolant/block warm for starting some guys will use a aftermarket magnet mounted heater on the bottom of the oil pan .....but each tractor has its own cold starting characterisitcs for example my little 4500 has never failed to start and all it has is intake air heat but i have never really needed it.....but my 5105m needs everything i can hook to it to start in the cold
 

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I too run Rotella 5w- 40 in my tractor year round In my tractor.
 
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I live in Illinois also but a little further south but it still gets cold. If your glow plugs are working it will start fine without a block heater, mine does. I agree on the 5w-40 oil also.
 

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I don’t have any problems starting mine using only glow plugs in any weather that I want to be outside on a tractor. I have cows and they need fed so sometimes I have to go out in less than ideal conditions.
Central Indiana here so similar weather.
 

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You do not need 40w oil in a diesel. Millions of VW diesels are running around with 5w30 oil in their sumps and NONE have ever failed due to lubrication issues. Had a VW diesel for nearly 7 years until VW bought it back from me.

So, 5w30 and now 0w30 are what I use in the JD and the Isuzu. The JD has M1's 0w30 ESP, and I plan to switch the Isuzu to it next year for its 10 year change. It now is running Castrol 5w30 from VW since the 50 hour change.

Another thing that got me into the lower numbered oils for the 1st digit is the switch to 0w20 for all 3 gasoline engines and finding that 0w30 was the ONLY (didn't have much 0w and 5w20 oils back then) one that STOPPED the hydraulic valve hammer on startup in the VW Cabrio I had back before the Miata and VW diesel. Hydraulic valve hammer is caused by air in the hydraulic valves. Anything heavier than a 0w30 just would not be picked up and pumped immediately by the oil pump to refill the lifters.

Ralph
 

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I am not specifically familiar with the oil requirements of the older Yanmar-engined machines but Deere's recommendations for newer engines are based on ambient air temperature range for when you use the engine. The numbers are not round numbers in Fahrenheit as Deere actually rates the temp range in Celsius.

  • 15W-40 is rated from 5-122 F.
  • Any multigrade oil with a cold rating of 10W (e.g. 10W-30) is rated down to -13 F.
  • Any multigrade oil with a cold rating of 5W (e.g. 5W-30) is rated down to -22 F.
  • Any multigrade oil with a cold rating of 0W (e.g. 0W-40) is rated down to -40 F.
  • Any multigrade oil with a hot rating of 40 (e.g. 15W-40) is rated up to 122 F.
  • Any multigrade oil with a hot rating of 30 (e.g. 10E-30) is rated up to 104 F.

For a reference point, Deere also ships every new engine by default with their 10W-30 Break-In Plus oil. Note that Break-In Plus is only available in 10W-30.

I use the John Deere Plus-50 II oil since the two "normal" grades of 10W-30 and 15W-40 are about the same price as other conventional oils and you can extend the drain interval to 500 hours instead of 250 if needed. Deere sells an 0W-40 synthetic as well but it is expensive and a special order item, while the other two grades are stocked in pallet quantities at the dealers. Typical temps around here in southern Missouri will maybe touch 100 F for the high a few days per year and get down to about -10 F for the low a few days per year, so the 10W-30 fits well without being some super-expensive synthetic like 0W-40.
 

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For a reference point, Deere also ships every new engine by default with their 10W-30 Break-In Plus oil.
The Augusta factory has not used break-in oil for a number of years and Yanmar engines are not shipped with break-in oil.
 

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I am not specifically familiar with the oil requirements of the older Yanmar-engined machines but Deere's recommendations for newer engines are based on ambient air temperature range for when you use the engine. The numbers are not round numbers in Fahrenheit as Deere actually rates the temp range in Celsius.

  • 15W-40 is rated from 5-122 F.
  • Any multigrade oil with a cold rating of 10W (e.g. 10W-30) is rated down to -13 F.
  • Any multigrade oil with a cold rating of 5W (e.g. 5W-30) is rated down to -22 F.
  • Any multigrade oil with a cold rating of 0W (e.g. 0W-40) is rated down to -40 F.
  • Any multigrade oil with a hot rating of 40 (e.g. 15W-40) is rated up to 122 F.
  • Any multigrade oil with a hot rating of 30 (e.g. 10E-30) is rated up to 104 F.

For a reference point, Deere also ships every new engine by default with their 10W-30 Break-In Plus oil. Note that Break-In Plus is only available in 10W-30.

I use the John Deere Plus-50 II oil since the two "normal" grades of 10W-30 and 15W-40 are about the same price as other conventional oils and you can extend the drain interval to 500 hours instead of 250 if needed. Deere sells an 0W-40 synthetic as well but it is expensive and a special order item, while the other two grades are stocked in pallet quantities at the dealers. Typical temps around here in southern Missouri will maybe touch 100 F for the high a few days per year and get down to about -10 F for the low a few days per year, so the 10W-30 fits well without being some super-expensive synthetic like 0W-40.
All oils in water cooled engines operate at the temperature set by the coolant thermstat, which is usually about 190 F. Makes no difference what the outside temperature is. Those upper temperature values in the oil charts are for air cooled engines.

Millions of VW diesels are running around with 5w30 oil in the crankcases. NONE have had engine failures due to oil.
 

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All oils in water cooled engines operate at the temperature set by the coolant thermstat, which is usually about 190 F. Makes no difference what the outside temperature is. Those upper temperature values in the oil charts are for air cooled engines.

Millions of VW diesels are running around with 5w30 oil in the crankcases. NONE have had engine failures due to oil.
Oil runs at a different temperature than the coolant. The viscosity number is higher at higher air temps because the oil isn’t able to cool enough while in the oil pan or oil cooler (if it has one). That number is not just for air cooled engines. Every engine has its own specific oil viscosity/ air temperature chart, even air cooled engines can have different requirements.
 

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