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GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
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It will probably survive an F1, and maybe an F2 when others won't, but an F4 or F5 direct hit, might make it interesting. After all, we have all seen the piece of straw that goes through concrete in tornado strength winds. I'd hate to be in there if it collapsed.
 

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I was wondering the same thing, to me the best thing and most cost efficient would be reinforcing a centrally located room. sure the outside will be better protected from a small storm, but going for something more F5 proof seems far more worth it.
 

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GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
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I had a great uncle that lived in the middle of Tornado Alley. He had seen so many of them in his life, he did not fear them. He would sit on the front porch of the frame house he built, and watch them go up the middle of the street. I think that happened twice. When I was a teenager, I did not understand it, but it didn't take many years for me to gain the understanding. I do not run and hide from the warnings either. Might get me one day, but if it is my time, hiding in a cellar, if you have one, isn't going to change that.
 

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My basement here in MI has a reinforced room - probably 5x12, cinderblock on all sides and a heavy 2x12 framed door on a track with an internal latch. I keep my chainsaw down there just in case something does happen and we need to cut ourselves out. most likely the debris on us will be wood (or cutable) material of some kind.
 

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GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
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My basement here in MI has a reinforced room - probably 5x12, cinderblock on all sides and a heavy 2x12 framed door on a track with an internal latch. I keep my chainsaw down there just in case something does happen and we need to cut ourselves out. most likely the debris on us will be wood (or cutable) material of some kind.
I've never cut cinder block with a chainsaw before, but in the situation you are describing, might do it. I wonder how badly the pieces would hurt? Better keep some protective clothing as well as goggles down there with that chainsaw.
 

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Some of you guys live with tornadoes like we live with snow. Give me snow any day.

We only had two deadly tornadoes in Alberta to my memory, 1987 & 2000. I think we are due again.

Sent from my SGH-I747M using Tapatalk
 

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GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
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Some of you guys live with tornadoes like we live with snow. Give me snow any day.

We only had two deadly tornadoes in Alberta to my memory, 1987 & 2000. I think we are due again.

Sent from my SGH-I747M using Tapatalk
If I had to live with as much snow as some of you do, tornadoes would not cause the death of me. SUICIDE would be the cause of my death! :nunu:
 

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I've never cut cinder block with a chainsaw before, but in the situation you are describing, might do it. I wonder how badly the pieces would hurt? Better keep some protective clothing as well as goggles down there with that chainsaw.
(2) of the walls are house foundation walls, the other 2 go into the basement. Plan would be to go through the reinforced 2x12 door back into the basement and up. It's a single level home so if it gets hit I don't expect there to be TOO much to have to go through. We don't really get big ones here, but even if a small one hits you right it'll squash a house like a bug. Even the roof of this room is poured concrete. I didn't even realize what it was until I started cleaning up the basement after I bought the place 3 years ago. There was just a ton of crap stored in there and you couldn't even see the door/tracks. It's nice to have should the sky go emerald on us. Mother-in-law had one come through her town only 1 mile away and a neighborhood not too far from me got hit last year, so they do occur, but with just a little prevention and being alert you can do just fine.

F4/5 is a different story. I've seen what they can do and it's downright scary, but I don't see any reason why you couldn't properly engineer something to withstand 300+mph winds and thrown debris, especially if you're layering (laminating) the materials to take advantage of each. A lot of the damage is the pressure differential getting between inside/outside and the roof lifting off causing the structure to fail. Looks like that "safe-house" has about a sea-crate sized reinforced structure within the first level of the house, and then a regular house build around it. Tie that bad-boy into the ground so it doesn't get thrown and don't let the pressure into the structure and, in theory, you'd be fine.

Can you tell I'm an Engineer :laugh: I'd have to see some serious testing data to ride the snake in it though.
 

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GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
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I'll sit on my front porch and marvel at its beauty.

I have a degree in engineering too, but I just think people spend too much time worrying.
Take some precautions, then let the chips fall! :flag_of_truce:
 
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