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Discussion Starter #1
For those following along with my ramp experience with my 18' Lamar 14k utility trailer, "18' Lamar 14k utility trailer, need ramp advice", I wanted to create a separate thread for tying down my tractor onto the trailer.

I have a 1025R TLB that I am wanting to transport, but in the past have only transported a Cub Cadet mower a grand total of one time... To me, this feels like jumping in the deep end of the pool since I really don't have any experience doing things like this - I certainly didn't grow up around it either. I sure for all of you all with goosenecks and actual heavy equipment this is something you can do in your sleep, so I'm hoping I can learn a little from you.

I used two 20-foot sections of 5/16" grade 70 chain and four ratcheting chain binders. Since this tractor is small, I didn't feel like I could go around the axles without crushing power steering components on compressing the tire. (I didn't want to pop the bead). As a result, I used some unorthodox locations - Are they safe for others + the tractor?

BH Frame.jpg BH Frame.jpg
Through the backhoe frame

Front.jpg
Used the front weight bracket to chain down the front since it seems strong

FrontLeft.jpg
FrontRight.jpg
Close Up.jpg


Any issues or pointers that you have? I did take it on a short trip at slow speeds around the neighborhood - No issues. :hide: This doesn't mean I feel confident to hit the highway for a two hour drive quite yet!
 

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I only see one possible issue.

FrontLeft.jpg

FrontRight.jpg

In these 2 pics your chains are pulling almost laterally. With optimum tieing down you want the front chains to pull frontward and the rear chains to pull rearward.

Now is where we get into difficulty with tieing these small machines down - especially the front if you have a loader on.

With the rear it looks like you could easily use an anchor point on the trailer more toward the rear without any interference with the equipment. On the front it gets interesting - how to get the chains to pull forward. That is where I use axle straps on the front axle (both sides) and get the chains to pull more forward. You needn't need to worry about squashing the tires to the point of breaking the bead - you don't need it that tight. Also a very good idea to have the tires at or near max inflation when on a trailer. Any rubber tire machine will bounce as going down the road and you want to eliminate as much of that as possible.

What you need to picture in your mind is you are trying to pull the tractor apart - one pair of chains pulling from the rear and one pair of chains pulling from the front. Of course you wouldn't be putting that much pressure on the tractor, but try to picture that in your mind.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have some bolt-on stake pockets and also D rings coming in the mail soon, I'll try to use them to get more of an X pattern instead of my current setup. I'm a little worried about cranking down on a bolted product instead of welded, but I'm also trying to keep in perspective this isn't an 8,000+ lb skid steer loader.
 

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I like to single pull on the chains not loop around. Hook one end of chain to load and other end to trailer, then binder between. Not a fan of looping chain threw and back to trailer. Binder can’t pull even on both sides. Just my 2cents.
 

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I think you are guilty of overkill with a 1 series using chains. I used straps when I had my 1025R and I still use straps with my 4066R, although I upgraded to 4 inch wide straps with chains on the ends. With the really heavy stuff, chains are a necessity. I noted that on some of your connections, you drop the chain through the stake pocket and then place the hook at the top of the stake pocket. I do this also because the chain stays in place while fastening everything in place. Otherwise, it drops down and is no longer connected to anything, causing me to walk around and rehook it. Pretty simple really, but it took me a long time to do it.

One of the other comments was right on regarding the necessity to "pull" frontwards or rearwards with your chains. If you have to stop quickly, you want the chains/straps to "pull". If they are straight sideways, the load can move forward/rearward before it takes up the slack. I tend to maybe over favor the "pull" factor. Another thing I do not like is when someone takes one chain/strap and runs it from one side to the other side, which allows the load to shift sideways. I put chains/straps on each corner. Another thing, any attachment should have a strap/chain over it. For example, the loader bucket would need a strap across it. Check your manual. Mine says to load my 4066R facing the rear, which most people do not do.

Dave
 

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I don't think what you have is all that bad. Yes, the front and rear tie downs should pull in opposing directions. Although, I think yours are at least somewhat pulling in opposing directions.

Also, 5/16" chain has a working load limit of 4700 lb so you definitely have enough strength.

I personally use nylon web binders. Plenty strong, don't scratch the paint and are just nicer to use. :dunno:
 

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I like to single pull on the chains not loop around. Hook one end of chain to load and other end to trailer, then binder between. Not a fan of looping chain threw and back to trailer. Binder can’t pull even on both sides. Just my 2cents.
The hook of the chain will likely slip over the weight bracket frame. I ran mine inside the frame and dropped the hook on the top of the frame. Leave the trailer end of the chain hooked as you have it. Put the binder in the middle.

I was always taught to only hook the binder to chain, not the trailer or the load.

I agree that chain is overkill for a 1 series, but that is not a bad thing. I use chain to secure the tractor and straps to secure the implements.

Coaltrain makes a good point with the theory of "pulling apart the tractor". That is a good way to explain it. :thumbup1gif:

Not bad for your first attempt. :good2:
 

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Deere specifies that the rear chains should be secured to the tractor and not the backhoe. From the 260B owner's manual:

  1. CAUTION: Avoid injury! Do not chain backhoe down in order to secure tractor to trailer.
    NOTE: Backhoe bucket should be lowered to trailer bed, if possible.
    Put wheel chocks against tractor wheels. Chain tractor securely to trailer bed.
  2. Do not attach hold-down chains to any part of the backhoe assembly. Lower the backhoe bucket to the trailer bed, if possible.
On my 1025R with 260 backhoe, if I use the most rearward stake pockets of the trailer, the chains can be secured around the tractor hitch plate without interfering with the backhoe or rear tires.
 

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Deere specifies that the rear chains should be secured to the tractor and not the backhoe. From the 260B owner's manual:

  1. CAUTION: Avoid injury! Do not chain backhoe down in order to secure tractor to trailer.
    NOTE: Backhoe bucket should be lowered to trailer bed, if possible.
    Put wheel chocks against tractor wheels. Chain tractor securely to trailer bed.
  2. Do not attach hold-down chains to any part of the backhoe assembly. Lower the backhoe bucket to the trailer bed, if possible.
On my 1025R with 260 backhoe, if I use the most rearward stake pockets of the trailer, the chains can be secured around the tractor hitch plate without interfering with the backhoe or rear tires.
I would be interested to know where you connect to if not the BH or other rear attachment when it is installed. There aren't too many places to connect to at the rear of the tractor. :dunno:

How do you connect to the rear draw hitch?
 

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Deere specifies that the rear chains should be secured to the tractor and not the backhoe. From the 260B owner's manual:

  1. CAUTION: Avoid injury! Do not chain backhoe down in order to secure tractor to trailer.
    NOTE: Backhoe bucket should be lowered to trailer bed, if possible.
    Put wheel chocks against tractor wheels. Chain tractor securely to trailer bed.
  2. Do not attach hold-down chains to any part of the backhoe assembly. Lower the backhoe bucket to the trailer bed, if possible.
On my 1025R with 260 backhoe, if I use the most rearward stake pockets of the trailer, the chains can be secured around the tractor hitch plate without interfering with the backhoe or rear tires.

The tractor must be secured as well as all implements attached.

I would lower the bucket to the deck, but I would also run a strap over it to secure it.

I can still get to the drawbar to put in a clevis on the 3039R with the 375A backhoe. Not easy, but still do-able.
 

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The law here in Penna -

Equipment under 10k# - 2 chains (or straps).
Equipment over 10k# - 4 chains.
Every implement must be on the deck and chained.

We were using a skid steer as an example at our training - even though the front loader is a permanent attachment it had to have its own chain. Same with a backhoe - loader and backhoe had to have its own chain each.
 

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I would be interested to know where you connect to if not the BH or other rear attachment when it is installed. There aren't too many places to connect to at the rear of the tractor. :dunno:

How do you connect to the rear draw hitch?
With both chains, I put the chain over and around the hitch plate and secure the chain back to itself. You have to get down on hands and knees on the trailer bed to do it, but that's the price you pay for a secure attachment point.

Edit: I agree with rtgt and Coaltrain. Both the loader bucket and backhoe bucket need be secured to the deck of the trailer with separate chains or straps. To do it right, you need six straps or chains to secure a TLB to a trailer. And then there's the recommended strap over the hood to keep it from flying open in the wind ...
 

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The tractor must be secured as well as all implements attached.

I would lower the bucket to the deck, but I would also run a strap over it to secure it.

I can still get to the drawbar to put in a clevis on the 3039R with the 375A backhoe. Not easy, but still do-able.
:bigthumb::bigthumb::bigthumb:

It can be done on a Series 1, because when I have the BH on that is how I secure it to the trailer.

Believe DOT laws states all attachments are to be lowered to the trailer surface.
 

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The law here in Penna -

Equipment under 10k# - 2 chains (or straps).
Equipment over 10k# - 4 chains.
Every implement must be on the deck and chained.

We were using a skid steer as an example at our training - even though the front loader is a permanent attachment it had to have its own chain. Same with a backhoe - loader and backhoe had to have its own chain each.
I see equipment being moved around here on "surface roads," not major highways or interstates, with to my eye, inadequate tiedown.

Particularly smaller equipment like ZTRs and ATVs on single axle big box store trailers. ZTRs hardly ever seem to be tied down.

I'm wondering if the rules and regulations are often enforced along the country back roads and residential areas?
 

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I see equipment being moved around here on "surface roads," not major highways or interstates, with to my eye, inadequate tiedown.

Particularly smaller equipment like ZTRs and ATVs on single axle big box store trailers. ZTRs hardly ever seem to be tied down.

I'm wondering if the rules and regulations are often enforced along the country back roads and residential areas?
It’s the same around here. I see lawn service guys with 2 zero turns and a bunch of other stuff on their trailers with nothing tied down.

When I used to run up into western NY I would often see the DOT guys with these lawn service and landscaping service rigs pulled over. Around here they only seem to be interested in the big trucks.

When I had my mowing service I had my tie downs down to a science. On the trailer or off within 2 minutes and properly tied down.
 

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With both chains, I put the chain over and around the hitch plate and secure the chain back to itself. You have to get down on hands and knees on the trailer bed to do it, but that's the price you pay for a secure attachment point.

Edit: I agree with rtgt and Coaltrain. Both the loader bucket and backhoe bucket need be secured to the deck of the trailer with separate chains or straps. To do it right, you need six straps or chains to secure a TLB to a trailer. And then there's the recommended strap over the hood to keep it from flying open in the wind ...
Got it!!! Concerning the hood.... actually, according to JD, the tractor is supposed to be backed on the trailer so the hood doesn't catch any wind. :good2:
 

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Personally, I think you are in the overkill category, but too much isnt necessarily a bad thing.
Id not loop the chains back to themselves that far. Id go through the bracket and right back to the chain itself, making the loop around the bracket as small as possible.
This eliminates any possible issues with tension on one side and not the other, then slipping and loosening up.

I personally use between 2-3 straps/chains to tie tractors down. Now, Ive tied down dozers and excavators years ago, with quite a few more obviously, but in my mind, I know what the load weighs, and what my chains or straps are rated for, and most times, its way less than even one strap is rated for.

I do NOT believe in tying hoods down. One, it will goof up your paint over time, and two, if its latched properly, it should be fine. This is just my personal experience, but having hauled tractors from Indiana to New York and back, Ive never had an issue with a hood. I know others who have. Your tractor and how well the hood fits and closes should dictate your decision on this. I also dont back the tractor on the trailer.

I would caution about tying the backhoe down by the bucket. If you have the transport pins in, and you should, they arent designed to take the weight of the entire tractor. If you put too much stress on that bucket, you are likely to break something thats not going to be easy to fix.
Just my opinion, but Id tie the tractor down as you have in the rear, and leave the rest. With the pins in, its not going anywhere. Even with them out, it wont go anywhere.
If you must tie the bucket down, take the pins out and put the bucket on the trailer deck, then tie it down.

On checking your chains/straps, driving around the block or neighborhood wont do too much. If Im only going 10 miles or so, I generally secure the tractor, finish up with everything else, check the tightness of everything and go.
If Im going further, Ill drive about 5 miles or so, then stop and check.
Youll get the hang of it after doing it a few times, and youll figure out pretty quick what will come loose and what wont.
Ive tied down so much odd stuff that now I can tell just about how long I can go before Ill have to stop and re-secure a strap. Generally, thats only on household type stuff that cant take a strap being very tight though. I cant say Ive ever had my tractors come loose.
 

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I see equipment being moved around here on "surface roads," not major highways or interstates, with to my eye, inadequate tiedown.

Particularly smaller equipment like ZTRs and ATVs on single axle big box store trailers. ZTRs hardly ever seem to be tied down.

I'm wondering if the rules and regulations are often enforced along the country back roads and residential areas?
Well actually, the load tie down laws that are written by states and the Feds really only apply to vehicles hauling loads "in commerce". The magic words are "in commerce".

So, what does this mean. The load tie down laws, along with all commercial motor vehicle laws, do not apply to people hauling things that are not hauling the item for a business, "in commerce". If you are hauling something for your own use, the DOT tie down laws do not apply.

I know that sounds ridiculous but it is absolutely true. Now, that doesn't mean you should haul something not properly tied down, it just means the DOT rules do not apply to you.

Of course, if you are hauling your tractor or zero turn for your landscaping business, then you are in commerce and the law applies.

The same thing can be said concerning a CDL license. People will say, if you drive a single or combination vehicle over 26,000 lb. GVWR, then you need a CDL to drive it.

This is not actually true. You can drive any vehicle down the highway without a CDL if you are using it for your own use. It it isn't "in commerce" you do not need a CDL to drive it, no matter what it is, even a tractor and trailer. This is why you can drive a huge motor home and you do not need a CDL.

The definition of a CMV (commercial motor vehicle):

Commercial motor vehicle means any self-propelled or towed motor vehicle used on a highway in interstate commerce to transport passengers or property when the vehicle—
(1) Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating, or gross vehicle weight or gross combination weight, of 4,536 kg (10,001 pounds) or more, whichever is greater; or
(2) Is designed or used to transport more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation; or
(3) Is designed or used to transport more than 15 passengers, including the driver, and is not used to transport passengers for compensation; or
(4) Is used in transporting material found by the Secretary of Transportation to be hazardous under 49 U.S.C. 5103 and transported in a quantity requiring placarding under regulations prescribed by the Secretary under 49 CFR, subtitle B, chapter I, subchapter C.

Again, just because the law doesn't apply to you if you are hauling your tractor for your own use doesn't mean you should haul it not sufficiently ties down, although, it is why law enforcement seems to ignore the lessor that good tie down things we see.
 

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Well actually, the load tie down laws that are written by states and the Feds really only apply to vehicles hauling loads "in commerce". The magic words are "in commerce".

So, what does this mean. The load tie down laws, along with all commercial motor vehicle laws, do not apply to people hauling things that are not hauling the item for a business, "in commerce". If you are hauling something for your own use, the DOT tie down laws do not apply.

I know that sounds ridiculous but it is absolutely true. Now, that doesn't mean you should haul something not properly tied down, it just means the DOT rules do not apply to you.

Of course, if you are hauling your tractor or zero turn for your landscaping business, then you are in commerce and the law applies.

The same thing can be said concerning a CDL license. People will say, if you drive a single or combination vehicle over 26,000 lb. GVWR, then you need a CDL to drive it.

This is not actually true. You can drive any vehicle down the highway without a CDL if you are using it for your own use. It it isn't "in commerce" you do not need a CDL to drive it, no matter what it is, even a tractor and trailer. This is why you can drive a huge motor home and you do not need a CDL.

The definition of a CMV (commercial motor vehicle):

Commercial motor vehicle means any self-propelled or towed motor vehicle used on a highway in interstate commerce to transport passengers or property when the vehicle—
(1) Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating, or gross vehicle weight or gross combination weight, of 4,536 kg (10,001 pounds) or more, whichever is greater; or
(2) Is designed or used to transport more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation; or
(3) Is designed or used to transport more than 15 passengers, including the driver, and is not used to transport passengers for compensation; or
(4) Is used in transporting material found by the Secretary of Transportation to be hazardous under 49 U.S.C. 5103 and transported in a quantity requiring placarding under regulations prescribed by the Secretary under 49 CFR, subtitle B, chapter I, subchapter C.

Again, just because the law doesn't apply to you if you are hauling your tractor for your own use doesn't mean you should haul it not sufficiently ties down, although, it is why law enforcement seems to ignore the lessor that good tie down things we see.

Are you sure about just jumping into a semi and taking a Sunday drive without an appropriate class license? The back of my driver's license say's vehicles not exceeding 26,000lb. Don't know of many semi trucks under that weight and this is the only license I have.:dunno:

Edit: Are you saying that you don't have to have a CDL BUT I would assume one would still have to get a different class/endorsement driver's license?
 

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I leave the pins out and put the bucket on the deck and tie it down. It stays put. There is some play in the pins and I don't care for the movement. Not all of our roads are nice and smooth.

I tend to follow the DOT rules, required or not, because (1) they make sense, (2) I value my equipment, and (3) there are too many injury lawyers out there.
 
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