Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I didn't want to intrude on the other post, but I've always wanted to learn welding so I picked up a Hobart 140 last week. Made a little D.I.Y. parking stand for my rear blade as my second welding project. First project was welding an old hitch on the rear of my box blade so I could move my trailer around.

Welds were ugly but it held until I accidentally dropped the blade off the forks directly onto the hitch and it broke off. So this morning I ground everything off and tried it again.

First pic is the parking stand and second is round two with the hitch. I think I need to extend it up and down from the gap more, but at least it looks better, to me anyway. To my untrained eye, it appears to have gotten a little penetration. I know we have some accomplished welders here, so any tips on things to try from here to improve?


Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,898 Posts
I'm not a professional welder but to my untrained eye the second weld looks good from a process/movement/puddle standpoint but seems to have very minimal penetration. Were you running the Hobart 140 at it's highest setting (i.e. thickest metal on the chart)?

I assume you are using flux core, if so what diameter?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,725 Posts
I learned to weld at adult ed classes in the 70's. My stick welder is so old that it was from Montgomery Wards. take your time and practice, practice, practice. I often thought about a new mig welder but always found something else for the money. My rule "has long has it holds spray paint will hide it".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,428 Posts
Good for you leaning something new! Thanks for sharing your first experience.

I seem to be in a mode of life right now where I crave learning stuff like this that I never did before. Welding has been on my list forever but having a wood plank floor in my barn and shop it has made me hesitate. Yeah, I could do it outside but....

I guess that practice makes perfect with most things like this. And what a great resource we all have here with so many folks willing and happy to help and spread their knowledge to us all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I'm not a professional welder but to my untrained eye the second weld looks good from a process/movement/puddle standpoint but seems to have very minimal penetration. Were you running the Hobart 140 at it's highest setting (i.e. thickest metal on the chart)?

I assume you are using flux core, if so what diameter?
Yes it is flux core, .030 wire. I had it set for the thickness of the box blade metal, which isn't as thick as the hitch metal. I think it was on 50 and 4. Better to set it for the thicker piece? I want sure on that one.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Good for you leaning something new! Thanks for sharing your first experience.

I seem to be in a mode of life right now where I crave learning stuff like this that I never did before. Welding has been on my list forever but having a wood plank floor in my barn and shop it has made me hesitate. Yeah, I could do it outside but....

I guess that practice makes perfect with most things like this. And what a great resource we all have here with so many folks willing and happy to help and spread their knowledge to us all.
Thank you. I'm stuck outside as I have a wooden floor too. Not the most convenient, but it'll work.

I've been hobby hunting for years. Hopefully I've found something that is fun and useful, and not too expensive.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I'm not a professional welder but to my untrained eye the second weld looks good from a process/movement/puddle standpoint but seems to have very minimal penetration. Were you running the Hobart 140 at it's highest setting (i.e. thickest metal on the chart)?
I agree with all of this, try turning it up to achieve better penetration. :good2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
596 Posts
I'm self taught too, on a Hobart 140ez MIG as well. I bought a couple welding books, read them, watched hundreds of Youtube videos and 'went to town'. I won't pretend to tell you whether you did good or not, as I'm not a qualified judge of that.
I'm guessing your receiver is on top, by seeing the hole there? One thing you can do is add a triangle gusset (1/8" or 3/16") underneath it, at the front and back, to give the receiver more support. Round out the corner at the 90* angle, so it fits over any previous weld bead. Then you aren't completely relying on just the welds where it rests on top of the BB.

A tip for welding thicker steel to thinner steel, is to preheat the thicker steel with a torch. Doesn't need to be glowing red hot, but get it hot. Then focus your torch more on the thicker steel, and "walk/lead" your puddle into the thinner steel, so you don't burn through it.

Under cutting the edge of the weld bead is my biggest hang up. Plus I don't weld enough to get really good at it. I do it just enough to be dangerous.:laugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
596 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I'm self taught too, on a Hobart 140ez MIG as well. I bought a couple welding books, read them, watched hundreds of Youtube videos and 'went to town'. I won't pretend to tell you whether you did good or not, as I'm not a qualified judge of that.
I'm guessing your receiver is on top, by seeing the hole there? One thing you can do is add a triangle gusset (1/8" or 3/16") underneath it, at the front and back, to give the receiver more support. Round out the corner at the 90* angle, so it fits over any previous weld bead. Then you aren't completely relying on just the welds where it rests on top of the BB.

A tip for welding thicker steel to thinner steel, is to preheat the thicker steel with a torch. Doesn't need to be glowing red hot, but get it hot. Then focus your torch more on the thicker steel, and "walk/lead" your puddle into the thinner steel, so you don't burn through it.

Under cutting the edge of the weld bead is my biggest hang up. Plus I don't weld enough to get really good at it. I do it just enough to be dangerous.
Great advice thank you. I probably should have started on something non-structural but I got excited. I kinda hope it breaks again so I can re-do it. I watched a ton of videos too, that's how I found that I was moving much too fast the first go round. I'll definitely try cranking it up higher the next time I try something that thick.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I do welding that I've learned throughout the years from others :spy: and used for my job when needed... :whip:
I'm not an expert, but I can stick 2 pieces of metal together pretty good. :mullet: The only real difference between a good welder and a bad weld?
... is a Harbor Freight Die Grinder.... :lolol:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,898 Posts
Yes it is flux core, .030 wire. I had it set for the thickness of the box blade metal, which isn't as thick as the hitch metal. I think it was on 50 and 4. Better to set it for the thicker piece? I want sure on that one.
Probably. I have a Hobart 140 as well and find with thicker metal you set it for the thicker material and then don't linger on the thinner stuff. You materials though appear thick enough that I doubt you'd have to worry much about burning through. Getting good penetration is the important thing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,898 Posts
A tip for welding thicker steel to thinner steel, is to preheat the thicker steel with a torch. Doesn't need to be glowing red hot, but get it hot. Then focus your torch more on the thicker steel, and "walk/lead" your puddle into the thinner steel, so you don't burn through it.
If he's like most of us he probably doesn't have a torch (i.e. oxy / acetylene).
Thank you. I'm stuck outside as I have a wooden floor too. Not the most convenient, but it'll work.

I've been hobby hunting for years. Hopefully I've found something that is fun and useful, and not too expensive.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
Same here... shed has a wooden floor so all my welding is outdoors. That's the main reason I do most of my work with a stick welder and just use flux core on the wire welder. Although I've seen guys weld outdoors with gas I guess it just depends on how much breeze there is.
I do welding that I've learned throughout the years from others :spy: and used for my job when needed... :whip:
I'm not an expert, but I can stick 2 pieces of metal together pretty good. :mullet: The only real difference between a good welder and a bad weld?
... is a Harbor Freight Die Grinder....
:lolol:
And some PAINT! :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,695 Posts
I agree. Turn it up and focus on the thicker piece. Don’t be afraid to for lack of a better explanation pulse your beads. ie: 4 short 1 second welds, then repeat. It Is easy to go in one big bead and have the puddle over run the arc and when your arc is in the puddle you are not getting to the base metal. The gusset idea is good or you could put another bead at the top and bottom of the one you have, again focused slightly on the metal then another bead between them and over the one you have.
You could also do the pulsing to the top, then to the bottom of the one you have. Whatever you are most comfortable with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
Light duty welders with flux core require multiple passes. One root pass at full power in circular pattern concentrating the most heat on the thicker material and then a bead on each side of the root finished off with a cap. Cleaning between passes. Practice makes perfect and small scrapes of steel can be practiced on and then given the bend test or pound on it with mauls to test the weld.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
@ jgayman... :flag_of_truce:

Sorry buddy... forgot the "FINISHING TOUCHUPS" ... :bigbeer:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Light duty welders with flux core require multiple passes. One root pass at full power in circular pattern concentrating the most heat on the thicker material and then a bead on each side of the root finished off with a cap. Cleaning between passes. Practice makes perfect and small scrapes of steel can be practiced on and then given the bend test or pound on it with mauls to test the weld.

best advice so far above.....certified welder here.....

a few tips

#1 turn the heat up ...its easier to fix holes than deal with lack of penetration...holes are usually a lack of proficency than over heat,.. too slow wire speed will pop sputter....to fast will push you away from your work
#2 MIG likes clean metal
#3 90% new welders weld at arms length to far away to see the puddle....get right up on it ...dress appropriately...learn a pattern (a steady gun is not a correct pattern)
#4 as stated above that weld called for a HOT root pass and pattern..then a clean up and cover passes
#5 practice

As i said TURN THE MACHINE UP....a FULL 140 amps is not enough to do the job in one pass

EDIT to add......vertical structural welds always go bottom to top NEVER the other way
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
best advice so far above.....certified welder here.....

a few tips

#1 turn the heat up ...its easier to fix holes than deal with lack of penetration...holes are usually a lack of proficency than over heat,.. too slow wire speed will pop sputter....to fast will push you away from your work
#2 MIG likes clean metal
#3 90% new welders weld at arms length to far away to see the puddle....get right up on it ...dress appropriately...learn a pattern (a steady gun is not a correct pattern)
#4 as stated above that weld called for a HOT root pass and pattern..then a clean up and cover passes
#5 practice

As i said TURN THE MACHINE UP....a FULL 140 amps is not enough to do the job in one pass

EDIT to add......vertical structural welds always go bottom to top NEVER the other way
Great tips thank you. So if I do two more passes on each side over what I've got there now, think it'll hold pulling an empty 20' trailer, or should I grind it off and try again from the beginning with the welder cranked up for the root weld? I don't mind doing that if I need to.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,898 Posts
Great tips thank you. So if I do two more passes on each side over what I've got there now, think it'll hold pulling an empty 20' trailer, or should I grind it off and try again from the beginning with the welder cranked up for the root weld? I don't mind doing that if I need to.
If you are pulling a 20' trailer I would grind it off and start over with a nice penetrating root pass. You certainly don't want trailers coming loose.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top