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I've been working my land at the cabin the last couple weekends now. The only thing I'm questioning what I should be doing is I have a soft spot, that's really soft. There was water sitting there in the spring, but quickly dried up. About 50 yards farther down the drive in progress there is what looks to be swamp land. About 50 yards long itself that was wet all up until late June. I've really built the swamp land up with gravel and some 6" corrugated pipe, perforated with sock and it's hard as a rock. I drive over with the 110 and you see no movement. The problem is the 50 yards before I can STAND and sink in an inch. The 110 drives over the softest area and it will sink in 8-10 inches or more. I've built this 15 foot long area up with nearly 15 yards of gravel and it still doesn't compact. I'm going to pop a drain tile in underneath this weekend, just so it will let any water build up flow. I've thought about excavating all the 'gunk' out until it's hard and filling it all back in with pea rock and gravel, but that is hardly economical and a lot of work. Since I'm in the process of building the driveway, I want to make sure this will hold up to cement trucks and such when we decide to build a house. I don't have any pictures, but I will get some this weekend while I'm there. Any ideas on what you would do would help. Thanks in advance.
 

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I've been working my land at the cabin the last couple weekends now. The only thing I'm questioning what I should be doing is I have a soft spot, that's really soft. There was water sitting there in the spring, but quickly dried up. About 50 yards farther down the drive in progress there is what looks to be swamp land. About 50 yards long itself that was wet all up until late June. I've really built the swamp land up with gravel and some 6" corrugated pipe, perforated with sock and it's hard as a rock. I drive over with the 110 and you see no movement. The problem is the 50 yards before I can STAND and sink in an inch. The 110 drives over the softest area and it will sink in 8-10 inches or more. I've built this 15 foot long area up with nearly 15 yards of gravel and it still doesn't compact. I'm going to pop a drain tile in underneath this weekend, just so it will let any water build up flow. I've thought about excavating all the 'gunk' out until it's hard and filling it all back in with pea rock and gravel, but that is hardly economical and a lot of work. Since I'm in the process of building the driveway, I want to make sure this will hold up to cement trucks and such when we decide to build a house. I don't have any pictures, but I will get some this weekend while I'm there. Any ideas on what you would do would help. Thanks in advance.
Hey Martian,
I have done miles of this kind of work. You mentioned excavating out the muck and back filling with good martieral, that is the best thing to do, but like you said a lot of work. What I would try is dig out about 12"-24" of the mock an if you have a sorce for crushed concrete use the bigger size stuff 3"- 6" stuff and start dumping it in to the hole. DO NOT use any round stone, it wll just keep sinking and will not lock together, after you get the drive stablelized top it off with what ever you choose, I would still recamend crushed stuff like the smaller 21A crushed concrete or lime stone. this method works good and if the drive still sinks in the future just add more crusher run and keep driving on it. Good luck.:drinks:
 

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Thanks has ...

This is kind of what I figured, just hoping someone would have a easier way. I love seat time as much as the next person, but I also love my weekends!
 

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Thanks has ...

This is kind of what I figured, just hoping someone would have a easier way. I love seat time as much as the next person, but I also love my weekends!
The big crushed concrete can do a lot of good on its own. If it is going to be awhile till you plan to run heavy trucks across it, just start dumping the crusher run on the drive and driving as much weight as you have across it. This is a coin toss as to if it will support the weight of concrete trucks. Most concrete trucks are 6 wheel drive and should be able to make it across the drive, but I would suggest having a load of stone on hand to fill in the rutts after each load of concrete.:drinks:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have a ton of brush, what about putting some of it under as a base? Some of the bigger stuff seems like it would work well? I had some gravel dropped off this week, but this driveway is getting expensive, quickly!

I'm a while (5-10 years) from cement trucks etc going back there, but I want to do it right at not have to deal with it.
 

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Highway fabric works great for stuff like this.

As mentioned above rock pushes into the dirt. The fabric stops it from doing that and increases the load capacity of the rock.

When I built my house it was terribly wet. We rolled out fabric, put 2-3" diameter crushed concrete on it about 6" deep and immediately drove large trucks on it.

It was also 'mucky' when I dug the basement so we dug the foundation 12" extra deep, added fabric and then 12" of large rock. Footings went on top of that.

Here is a picture of rock and fabric.

I am a big fan of this fabric.
 

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I have a ton of brush, what about putting some of it under as a base? Some of the bigger stuff seems like it would work well? I had some gravel dropped off this week, but this driveway is getting expensive, quickly!

I'm a while (5-10 years) from cement trucks etc going back there, but I want to do it right at not have to deal with it.
Not sure I would use the brush, But I have seen logs 6"- 8" in dia layed side by side across drives/roads for a base.
 

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I am lookign at building a driveway back to my land and the excavator said I needed crushed concrete. The issue I dislike about that is the re-rod in it. That can kill tires! But it makes sense and I will probably go that way, but be carefull driving on it until its covered in gravel.
 

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Never had issues finding re-bar but have found some wire mat. That can be hard on tires as well. I personally wouldn't want anything under the drive that could decompose like brush. When it does you have a lot of money in concrete that is going to settle.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the replies. I guess I'll look into some crushed concrete. Definitely don't want this to be a lingering problem.
 

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Thanks for all the replies. I guess I'll look into some crushed concrete. Definitely don't want this to be a lingering problem.
Do you have crushed lime rock in your area? That works well also, start with the 2" stuff for a base, then "3/4 inch with fines" to top it off. It interlocks like Has15 said, then the fines pack and set up like cement. Around here it is about $250.00 for a 12 yard load (hauled).
Now if you only had a TLB to dig out the muck:laugh:
 

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If the spot is super soft start out with 6" clean crushed limestone without fines. Top it off with 1-2" with fines in it. You need the fines to seal the 6". The reason I would go with the 1-2" is that all of the construction traffic will grind up the rock and you might as well start with a larger size that will take longer to get ground up.
After you get your house built then you can put 3/4-1" with fines on the drive or if the drive has a lot of fines and not much rock you could also put 1" clean on it.
If possible I would stay away from crushed concrete because in my experience the concrete continues to get crushed up as you drive over it and you wind up with a lot of powder with just a few rocks.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You guys aren't going to believe this:

I'll start the story with this: I've come to be good friends with the local construction/landscaping guy by my cabin. Really a great guy. He's been the one dropping the gravel off for me for the driveway, did some work at my old cabin. Anyway, he's been in the loop with me getting the 110, how the driveways going and all that.

So I get up friday evening, planning to call him and buy some of the crushed concrete. Before I have the chance he stops over. He does quite often, just to check progress and see if I want anything else. He tells me that he's got his truck loaded up with a bunch of crushed concrete that would be perfect for my soft spot in the driveway. I'm thinking what's the chances? He goes on to say that there's some paint or something so he can't take it to his usual place so he'll have to haul it further to a landfill and tells me he'll drop it off for free. I'm glad I didn't let it slip already that I'm ready to pay for it! So he says he'll be over first thing saturday (today) to drop it off. Great!

He then tells me, I want to buy your utility trailer. He knew I needed to upgrade, knew I rented a trailer to haul the 110 up and wanted a bigger trailer. Kind of knocked me off my socks. I told him it's yours. He's a small operation, so he only had a larger tag (I want to say 20 ton) that he tows behind his dump truck to haul all of his equipment. Occasionally if he needed to get some pipe or similar he'd haul it behind his 2500 and that trailer alone is all that truck would want to handle. So he wanted it to haul some lighter stuff around. Now I have a perfect excuse to get that new 20' 14k pounder!
 

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Score! :yahoo:
 

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Highway fabric works great for stuff like this.

As mentioned above rock pushes into the dirt. The fabric stops it from doing that and increases the load capacity of the rock.

When I built my house it was terribly wet. We rolled out fabric, put 2-3" diameter crushed concrete on it about 6" deep and immediately drove large trucks on it.

It was also 'mucky' when I dug the basement so we dug the foundation 12" extra deep, added fabric and then 12" of large rock. Footings went on top of that.

Here is a picture of rock and fabric.

I am a big fan of this fabric.
I agree 100%, that's what you need. Every freeze/thaw cycle will blend your base material with the muck below. I also would not bury any organic stuff in there because it will decompose leaving voids that will create soft spots anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Okay, I admit, I forgot to take pictures, and then I forgot again, and again :lol: But I have some now!

I don't have reference for before the drive, so I took a picture straight across the driveway to the land I own on the other side of the street. I have a Polaris 4 wheeler that I couldn't find a way to the back of the land before the path, it was extremely thick!
IMG_1258.jpg

Here is the start of the driveway. I don't mean to be unfriendly, but the 'Keep Out' sign is only for liability, definitely not meant for all of you!
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Heading down the first part of the drive.
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Making the first bend.
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First bend made, heading toward the soft spot and second bend.
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Approaching where it was soft. You'll see it's built up here and the 8" drain tile underneath. More pictures of it to follow.
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Here's the left side, drains from the left to the right. It was actually really nice that when I laid the drain tile it was pouring rain outside with lots of built up water so I could easily see how it was flowing.
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The right side is holding a little standing water. I'm trying to let it dry up a little bit, then I'm going to grade it out a little more to carry it all the way to the swamp. More work to be done here.
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One of the many brush piles I have right now. This one is the largest though, going to have plenty of firewood for a long time!
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Proceeding down the drive, about to make bend #2.
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After the second bend is another wet area. Luckily this one wasn't soft, but I did run some drain tiles here as well. I couldn't find the 8" at first, so there are 3, 6" tiles here, more pictures of them too come.
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To the left of the driveway.
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To the right of the driveway. Notice some of the still uncovered crushed concrete.
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Proceeding down the drive.
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Now we are getting to where I have run out of gravel for the time being. Don't want to make much more permanent before I know house plans, which is a ways out.
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Continued, below:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Reaching the landing area to the left. Plan to cut some more trees out for easier access to the water.
IMG_1273.jpg

Landing area to the right. Plan to clear here as well for a nice fire pit and be able to turn around easier.
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View out toward the water.
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And if you haven't yet noticed, a picture of the Cub back toward the road.
IMG_1275.jpg
 

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You will need a GPS to find your house. Nice job.

Don
 
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