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Discussion Starter #1
So doing the full round of spring maintenance today at 800 hours on my 1026, I ran into some issues.

First is, I was going to replace a ripped rubber boot that's over the front drive shaft connection. There's a snap ring, decent sized one. I broke my apparently cheap snap ring pliers, and I'm not even sure they were going to be able to open wide enough to get it off. So am I correct that I need to remove this snap ring, then I can slide the shaft back and slide on my new boot? Any snap ring pliers purchase advice that are decent quality and can actually open enough for this?

Secondly, the allen head bolt is a pain to remove to get the magnet screen out. Especially with my backhoe subframe. The issue is having your tiny little allen wrench stay in the shallow hole, enough leverage, etc etc. I ended up just clamping vise grips down really hard and turning it that way. Pretty sure I stripped the allen into a nice circle too while trying.

Lastly while removing the hydraulic filter I noticed something broken on my mid mount pto bracket thingy. I've attached a pic. How crucial/serious do you think this is?

Thanks
 

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So doing the full round of spring maintenance today at 800 hours on my 1026, I ran into some issues.

First is, I was going to replace a ripped rubber boot that's over the front drive shaft connection. There's a snap ring, decent sized one. I broke my apparently cheap snap ring pliers, and I'm not even sure they were going to be able to open wide enough to get it off. So am I correct that I need to remove this snap ring, then I can slide the shaft back and slide on my new boot? Any snap ring pliers purchase advice that are decent quality and can actually open enough for this?

Secondly, the allen head bolt is a pain to remove to get the magnet screen out. Especially with my backhoe subframe. The issue is having your tiny little allen wrench stay in the shallow hole, enough leverage, etc etc. I ended up just clamping vise grips down really hard and turning it that way. Pretty sure I stripped the allen into a nice circle too while trying.

Lastly while removing the hydraulic filter I noticed something broken on my mid mount pto bracket thingy. I've attached a pic. How crucial/serious do you think this is?

Thanks
Last first. That is not good. May need to see if it can be welded. I would imagine the tab is lost. Vice grips may help with the Allen screw. Can't remember problem 1.

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Last first. That is not good. May need to see if it can be welded. I would imagine the tab is lost. Vice grips may help with the Allen screw. Can't remember problem 1.

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Yes, you'll definitely want to address that PTO shaft carrier bearing flange before you utilize it again. Others have reported their PTO shafts coming apart, flopping around, hitting the transaxle spin-on filter and sheering it off. The filter nipples is part of the transaxle housing. Definitely a big buck repair. It is way too much of a risk to chance.
 

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What they said. I wouldn’t turn it back on til fixed. If it comes loose while running, you are looking at big problems.:gizmo:
 

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What they said. I wouldn’t turn it back on til fixed. If it comes loose while running, you are looking at big problems.:gizmo:
Yeah - spinning drive shafts can cause havok quickly when they come loose.......
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Any snap ring plier suggestions for taking off these pretty large snap rings?

It looks like when I replace that, I just need to remove that snap ring and take off the three bolts and it will come loose?

Looks like part AM143641, $50, just ordered it.

Edit: Just bought these snap ring pliers, sounds like they should be big enough and awesome quality: https://www.amazon.com/4921A31-External-Precision-Retaining-8-5-Inch/dp/B0002YYMDU/
 

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Any snap ring plier suggestions for taking off these pretty large snap rings?

It looks like when I replace that, I just need to remove that snap ring and take off the three bolts and it will come loose?

Looks like part AM143641, $50, just ordered it.

Edit: Just bought these snap ring pliers, sounds like they should be big enough and awesome quality: https://www.amazon.com/4921A31-External-Precision-Retaining-8-5-Inch/dp/B0002YYMDU/
You did the right thing in replacing the broken PTO shaft carrier bearing flange. Make sure you get the deck and PTO carrier set up properly. When set up and done properly the mower deck should go on like butter.
 

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Snap on ring pliers are the way to go. I got a 7pc set on ebay for 150 bucks. I know there expensive, but they are so worth it.

IMG_20170614_195303758.jpg

I'll get a picture of the pliers later.

If you don't need a whole set, get the snap-on SRPC 7000. They are a good all-around size, being that they have a .7mm tip size. The ring in the picture required the SRPC 9090, with a .9mm tip. They also make them in 45 degree (SRPC 7045) and 90 degree versions (SRPC 7090)
 

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Any snap ring plier suggestions for taking off these pretty large snap rings?

It looks like when I replace that, I just need to remove that snap ring and take off the three bolts and it will come loose?

Looks like part AM143641, $50, just ordered it.

Edit: Just bought these snap ring pliers, sounds like they should be big enough and awesome quality: https://www.amazon.com/4921A31-External-Precision-Retaining-8-5-Inch/dp/B0002YYMDU/

Those look to be for internal rings only. While high quality, they won't work very well- if at all. You need either a reversible set or some for external rings.
 
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Those look to be for internal rings only. While high quality, they won't work very well- if at all. You need either a reversible set or some for external rings.
You might look again, the pliers are for external snap rings.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yep, I purchased external ones, they are the only kind of ones I've seen I need for my tractor and most things so far.

How do I know what the torque specs are for the bolts holding this on? Does it matter too much, just a a couple ugga duggas, or possibly 3? Hehe


Ugga Dugga. (Ugg-guh dug-guh)

Unit of Measurement regarding time and usually torque. Often found in automotive stores, mechanic's garages, and redneck tractor pulls.
Ugga duggas can be counted infinitely, but it is commonly understood that 5 Ugga duggas is the maximum for torque, while three Ugga duggas is sufficient to hold most projects.
 

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Yep, I purchased external ones, they are the only kind of ones I've seen I need for my tractor and most things so far.

How do I know what the torque specs are for the bolts holding this on? Does it matter too much, just a a couple ugga duggas, or possibly 3? Hehe
If you could document the removal would be great. Also take shaft off tranny side and grease up the spline well. I have to take mine off due to that wearing and now I get a chattering noise when not in 4x4. I think it is the universal side that is worn, I Hope!

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Yep, I purchased external ones, they are the only kind of ones I've seen I need for my tractor and most things so far.

How do I know what the torque specs are for the bolts holding this on? Does it matter too much, just a a couple ugga duggas, or possibly 3? Hehe
The Technical Service Manual has torque ranges for the individual items on many / most repairs and service issues for each machine. The manual also gives the maximum torque ranges for the hardware based upon the hardware grading. I would strongly suggest obtaining either the "E" copy of the manual or the book form. Make sure to get it through Deere so it's an authentic manual as there are some low price sellers of manuals on Ebay and other sources which sell "generalized" service manuals for tractors. While the generalized manuals are less expensive, they are also void of the details which make the Deere Technical Service Manuals so valuable.

With the Technical Service manual, you can handle a wide range of repairs on your tractor with valuable guidance. These are the same manuals the Deere technicians use to work on this equipment. I have always had these Technical Service Manuals for my Deere tractors and found them to be extremely valuable.

Personally, I prefer the actual "Book" version of the manual which is more expensive to purchase. The electronic version of the book comes on CD Rom or through a download (I would want the CD to be able to install the manual on multiple computers and for new computers added in the future).

Many of the bolts on these machines are torqued well below the "Ugga Dugga one more Tugga" level. I actually sheered off a rear transmission housing case bolt on my older tractor during a rear hydro rebuild by accidentally grabbing the wrong torque wrench, which I had calibrated to torque the axle flange bolts. I was using 3 different torque wrenches based upon the size of the bolt and amount of torque needed.

As I was tightening that casing bolt, I was thinking "This sure seems excessive" as the torque wrench didn't click and release. Just then, it "COMPLETELY RELEASED", instead of the torque wrench indicating the desired torque had been reached, the head of the bolt sheared off. :banghead::banghead::banghead:

I spent nearly two hours extracting the broken bolt in the housing and I was lucky that I was able to get it out without taking the rear end back apart. So, no "Ugga Dugga, give it another Tugga" for me, ever again.........and I was trying to properly assemble things with the torque wrench. I just grabbed the wrong wrench being in a hurry.

The Technical Service Manual is worth the money and an investment in making sure your tractor is properly serviced. It has all of the electrical diagrams and schematics which are crucial for these new machines. Think of the new cost of the $130 book form of the manual as about 1.25 hours of labor you can save paying the dealership when you are able to handle a wider range of repairs going forward.......

Also, you will find that some repairs require specialized tools, especially should you ever get into trying to measure hydraulic pump function and flow rates, etc. and the manuals identify the tools you may need. The Technical Service Manual is a great investment in your machines service future.

Here is a source to order one if you didn't want to go through your dealer for some reason.

https://www.greenpartstore.com/John-Deere-Technical-Service-Manual-TM126919.html
 
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I prefer the electronic version of the Technical Manual---at least for purchase. It is about half the price.

I have a workhorse color LaserJet printer, with duplexer (two-sided printing) that I utilize to print the entire manual. I then punch the pages with a three hole paper punch and place the pages in a 3" ring binder. I utilize a ring binder with the clear sleeve wrapped around the outside. I then print an extra sheet of the manual face page to slide in the front cover sleeve, to identify it. I usually use Word to make up an identity strip for the end binder, so it is readily identifiable on the shelf amongst all the other manuals.

I still prefer a paper manual to electronic when working in the shop, though I have a desktop PC on the workbench, with a dual output video card, so I can also display the PC screen on my wall mounted 50" HD TV for those instances that I don't have on paper.

The other plus to an electronic version is if I soil a page, I can easily replace it.

Another plus that I utilizes frequently here on GTT and other forums is that I can use the sniping tool to capture a page, make notations on it, and post it within a relevant discussion.

If you don't have a workhorse printer, many local print shops will print the manual for you and optionally bind it in a choice of a number of different binding types---at an affordable price.
 

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If you could document the removal would be great. Also take shaft off tranny side and grease up the spline well. I have to take mine off due to that wearing and now I get a chattering noise when not in 4x4. I think it is the universal side that is worn, I Hope!

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Removing the mower deck PTO shaft is very simple and straight forward:

1. Release the U-Joint coupler connection at the transaxle by pulling the coupler outer sleeve forward and then slide the assembly forward of the transaxle PTO shaft.

2. Remove the clevis pins from the height adjusting fork on each side, allowing the lift arm that supports the autoconnect coupler to drop.

3. Remove each adjustment fork with adjustable looped rod from each side. Be careful not to upset the adjustment or interchange the forks from side to side as this would alter the level of the mower deck. I add 3/8 fine thread nuts to the thread shafts and utilize them as jam nuts to prevent the adjustment from being disturbed accidentally. I label each fork with a permanent marker to denote "L" and "R", also.

4. Remove the clevis pins securing the front of the lift bar arms into the frame rails, on each side.

5. Withdraw the mower PTO shaft from beneath the tractor.

After replacing the bearing carrier and re-installing the mower deck PTO shaft assembly, the autoconnect coupler will need to be adjusted via the long threaded bolt that is in the bottom of the bearing carrier. To adjust this, park the tractor on a level surface and have the tires inflated to the proper pressure. Place a torpedo level across the face of the autoconnect PTO coupler vertically, to indicate "plumb" (vertical level). Adjust the long threaded bolt for a plumb indication and secure the jam nuts while maintaining a plumb indication.

Another tip:

As a preventative measure, apply blue Loctite to threads of the setscrews securing the male autoconnect coupler on to the mower deck gearbox input shaft. They are known for working loose and can cause the male coupler to become jammed into the mating female coupler.

I've attached the installation instructions, also:
 

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Removing the mower deck PTO shaft is very simple and straight forward:

1. Release the U-Joint coupler connection at the transaxle by pulling the coupler outer sleeve forward and then slide the assembly forward of the transaxle PTO shaft.

2. Remove the clevis pins from the height adjusting fork on each side, allowing the lift arm that supports the autoconnect coupler to drop.

3. Remove each adjustment fork with adjustable looped rod from each side. Be careful not to upset the adjustment or interchange the forks from side to side as this would alter the level of the mower deck. I add 3/8 fine thread nuts to the thread shafts and utilize them as jam nuts to prevent the adjustment from being disturbed accidentally. I label each fork with a permanent marker to denote "L" and "R", also.

4. Remove the clevis pins securing the front of the lift bar arms into the frame rails, on each side.

5. Withdraw the mower PTO shaft from beneath the tractor.

After replacing the bearing carrier and re-installing the mower deck PTO shaft assembly, the autoconnect coupler will need to be adjusted via the long threaded bolt that is in the bottom of the bearing carrier. To adjust this, park the tractor on a level surface and have the tires inflated to the proper pressure. Place a torpedo level across the face of the autoconnect PTO coupler vertically, to indicate "plumb" (vertical level). Adjust the long threaded bolt for a plumb indication and secure the jam nuts while maintaining a plumb indication.

Another tip:

As a preventative measure, apply blue Loctite to threads of the setscrews securing the male autoconnect coupler on to the mower deck gearbox input shaft. They are known for working loose and can cause the male coupler to become jammed into the mating female coupler.

I've attached the installation instructions, also:
I believe the op is doing the driveshaft for the front wheel drive, not the mid mount PTO. He needs to replace the the rubber shroud around front u joint on the front axle. You don't need tools for the mid mount mmm drive. But thanks for the detailed run down of removal.

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I'm replacing the bearing carrier and the front boot, two separate issues. Just fixed both. Of course just found this.... Missing bolts for my radiator, wow! Ever seen this before?
Any slop in the rear spline on 4x4 driveshaft and did you grease it u p like I suggested?

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I prefer the electronic version of the Technical Manual---at least for purchase. It is about half the price.

I have a workhorse color LaserJet printer, with duplexer (two-sided printing) that I utilize to print the entire manual. I then punch the pages with a three hole paper punch and place the pages in a 3" ring binder. I utilize a ring binder with the clear sleeve wrapped around the outside. I then print an extra sheet of the manual face page to slide in the front cover sleeve, to identify it. I usually use Word to make up an identity strip for the end binder, so it is readily identifiable on the shelf amongst all the other manuals.

I still prefer a paper manual to electronic when working in the shop, though I have a desktop PC on the workbench, with a dual output video card, so I can also display the PC screen on my wall mounted 50" HD TV for those instances that I don't have on paper.

The other plus to an electronic version is if I soil a page, I can easily replace it.

Another plus that I utilizes frequently here on GTT and other forums is that I can use the sniping tool to capture a page, make notations on it, and post it within a relevant discussion.

If you don't have a workhorse printer, many local print shops will print the manual for you and optionally bind it in a choice of a number of different binding types---at an affordable price.
Easier to just use the PDF search function then j u st print what you need. IMHO.

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Discussion Starter #20
Any slop in the rear spline on 4x4 driveshaft and did you grease it u p like I suggested?

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You mean slop in the sense of being able to slightly rotate the shaft on the spline without the spline moving? Pretty sure it was tight... It actually didn't want to even slide back and forth on it very well. I didn't grease it, I already had it all back together when you posted that.
 
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