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Discussion Starter #1
Rear tire on my 1025r has gone flat 3 times in the past 4 months. First time, pumped it up, no issues for 3 months. Last week at the height of the nor'easter (Tuesday), go to start cleaning up the driveway, dead flat. PIA to get the wheel off and into the garage. Thankfully still have the backhoe on and can used the outriggers to jack up the rear. Re-inflate and it was fine until this morning when it was flat again. Re-inflate, and sprayed soapy water around the bead on each side, around and in the valve stem. No bubbles. Checked the tread visually and with soapy water and still didn't find the leak. Anyone got any ideas short of submerging it? Thanks.
 

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You checked around the stem. Did you check the actual valve seal inside the stem?

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Oops. Missed you did that.

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Discussion Starter #4
You checked around the stem. Did you check the actual valve seal inside the stem?

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Yup, tried the old spit test as well as soapy water, no bubbles.
 

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When I had tire trouble with my 455, it was when I pushing or pulling hard with it. Such as moving earth. It had the OEM turf tires and they were 2-ply with an inflation of 10psi. The pressure just wasn't enough to keep the bead seated when pushing/pulling a heavy load. Tubes didn't help, as the slippage would pinch the tube or pull the valve stem. I finally went to 6 ply tires--not for the added weight capacity, but I can inflate them to 35psi. With that kind of pressure, I haven't had any issues with flats since.

The 1025R is equipped with 4-ply tires. I just took delivery on mine two weeks ago, promptly brought it into the shop and took it apart. So I've only driven it on/off the trailer and to detach the FEL and backhoe. According to the Owner's Manual, the rear tire is to be inflated to 20 psi. I suspect you broke the bead when pushing snow and have dirt/contaminants between the bead and rim now, allowing it to leak. You're probably going to have to, at a minimum, break the bead and wash out the rim and bead. You may have to demount the tire to clean it out if it is really dirty. Check the ratings on the tire and see if it has a higher rating than 20 psi that you can inflate to when pushing/pulling with it.

Also, air contracts with colder temperatures and tire pressures drops with colder temps. So re-check your tire pressure in cold temperatures. This is a common issue, here in MN.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks martincom. I will clean the beads tomorrow and see if it holds.
 
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You may not be able to brake the bead away form the rim, without a tire machine or bead buster.
 
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Nothing else , tire slim.
Nothing raises my blood pressure more than stinking flat tires. All set to do a project and have to work on something to use it.
Most of my trailer and ATV tires all have slim in them. The slim now is washes off with water and does not corrode the rim.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You may not be able to brake the bead away form the rim, without a tire machine or bead buster.
When it went flat, had to get it out of my shed to fix it. Only took about 3 or 4 revolutions and it broke the bead. I think I can
break it with a block and dead blow mallet.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Nothing else , tire slim.
Nothing raises my blood pressure more than stinking flat tires. All set to do a project and have to work on something to use it.
Most of my trailer and ATV tires all have slim in them. The slim now is washes off with water and does not corrode the rim.
Thanks Rodney. If cleaning the bead fails, I'll get some tire slime.
 
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Don't forget that the wheel is part of the containment system. Suggest you inspect it for cracks or slight bends. I've had this problem on a car that was mysteriously going flat regularly. There was absolutely nothing wrong with the tire.
 

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Thought of another flat problem that caught me once. Check to ensure that the valve stem is properly tightened with a valve stem wrench. I've seen one that was slightly loose causing a situation like you have described. If you are running out of other possibilities, you might want to just replace the valve stem. They are cheap and can become defective.
 

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One brand of GT with tires this size had virtually all the tires leak right through the tread because of weathering cracks.
The only solution was to either replace the tires or add tubes.

The tire is small enough to fit in a tire tub, that will show the leak.

Or,,, slip over to the Clampett's and roll the tire into their cement pond.
Hold it down,, until you see the leak.

If it is leaking at the bead,, always look for multiple leaks.
 

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had a tire on my Jeep that had a slow leak. Sometimes it leaked a little faster! :banghead: Did all the usual checking with soapy water, took it to a shop, etc.

Turned out it was the valve stem. It was actually split and the tire shop guy noticed it when I had them dismount it so I we could make sure the bead area was completely clean. Replaced the $1.50 valve stem and all was good.
 

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Good way to spot a leak is have the tires filled. Two things happen when you do this:
1-You have more weight on the rear which helps.
2-If you get a leak you will see it and where it is leaking. Usually before it leaks all the way down.
Good luck...
 
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As long as your breaking the bead to clean the rim I would put a new valve stem in.
 

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The no brainer way of fixing these kinds of leaks is with an inner tube - no diagnosis involved!

I've had this problem on a number of wheels - usually low pressure tires for reasons already mentioned - and have yet to find a leak in any of them with soapy water and even immersion. I usually put the inner tube in myself since taking it to a tire shop is almost an hour round trip just for the drive.

I usually use auto pry bars and an occasional screwdriver to break the bead. Hammers do not work as they simply rebound instead of transferring force. Do a bit at a time all around the wheel and the bead will be unseated. Using a wrench to twist the pry bar when you start helps things along. Pry the bead over the rim with two pry bars (one to hold and one to pry). See note on wheel recess below. Flip the wheel over and break the other bead. You don't need to take the tire completely off the wheel.

Now that you have enough room to get your hand inside, run it all along the inner wall to feel for any sharp objects that might be the reason for the leak. WHEN YOU BUY YOUR INNER TUBE MAKE SURE IT IS A MODEL WITH A THREADED VALVE STEM!!! At least for the big tires. Nothing is as frustrating as filling a newly repaired wheel and having the valve stem of the tube get sucked into the wheel and then have no way to dismount the tire again short of puncturing your new tube to let the air out!

Tuck the inner tube into the tire after fastening the valve stem to the wheel and CAREFULLY use the pry bars to place the bead back inside the wheel. Note that the recessed portion of the wheel has a purpose - to create a space for the bead to go while you pry on the opposite side. Beads do not stretch! You also want to ensure that you don't pinch your new tube between a pry bar and the wheel. You'll find that as you are getting started the bead will have a tendency to slip off the wheel as you try to pry it over the rim. A pair of Vise Grips clamped on the wheel rim makes a good 2nd pair of hands to keep the tire from slipping as you work it over the rim. You want to start with the valve stem centered on as much of he tire as you can initially place inside the rim with your hands and finish your prying on the opposite side of the wheel.

The last one I did was a rear tire on my 650 - a 15 or 16 inch wheel IIRC - and it took me maybe 20 minutes.

Al
 

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Thanks Rodney. If cleaning the bead fails, I'll get some tire slime.
Went to the Slime website yesterday, my GX335's got a rear slow leak. They state in the FAQ section Slime "will not cure bead leaks". They say it's only for "tread area" leaks and sealing.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Went to the Slime website yesterday, my GX335's got a rear slow leak. They state in the FAQ section Slime "will not cure bead leaks". They say it's only for "tread area" leaks and sealing.
Thanks Harold. If cleaning the bead doesn't do it, I'll have to go for a tube. It's on todays list of stuff to do.
 
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