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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a Frontier RT1149 tiller for my 1025R and I have a question. There are plastic sleeves that go over the driveshaft. One is inside of the other so they can telescope as the driveshaft length changes. My question is that there is a little chain on each end and I'm not sure what that is for and the instructions don't show anything. Is the plastic sleeves supposed to turn with the driveshaft or do you clip the chains to hold the plastic stationary? Any of you guys know what I am supposed to do with them? Thanks!
 

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The chains get secured to anything fixed to keep the plastic safety shield from spinning. There should also be some plastic grease zerks on the shield to lube the points where it attaches to the shaft, these are often overlooked.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The chains get secured to anything fixed to keep the plastic safety shield from spinning. There should also be some plastic grease zerks on the shield to lube the points where it attaches to the shaft, these are often overlooked.
OK, I did see the little plastic grease zerks. Thanks! The crazy manual that came with it probably has 300 pages and only about 6 of them are in English and don't really explain very much. It is in languages that I have never even heard of before.
 

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I always forget about those plastic grease fitting, might be why my chain was torn off last time I used the tiller. Easy repair.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've never had a tiller like this before, but part of the deal with my wife to buy the 1025R was that she wanted a big garden and wanted me to get a tiller. I will be tilling a area that has never been tilled before. Wouldn't I want to set the depth as deep as possible? How do you know how deep you should till? My first thought was leave it as deep as possible and use the three point to adjust the depth. Is that dumb or hard on the tractor? what do you guys do? Do you ever change the depth? I noticed that when you set it on the cement to store it, if it is very deep at all, it sets on the tines instead of the feet and then it wants to tilt cockeyed from side to side even with the stand leg down. Am I doing something wrong? I ended up putting a 3" block under each foot and then it sat nice and even because the tines were not touching the floor. Is that OK. Sorry for the dumb questions, but this is all new to me. Thanks
 

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No questions are "dumb" ones, especially if you are new to something.

Ok, I might be able to help a bit. In my experience with "virgin" ground, your best bet may be to first run a plow through the area you would like your garden. This serves three purposes.

First, the plow should make you aware of any sizable rocks under that grass that could make for a costly repair to your tiller.

Second, the plow will break-up the ground and make for a much easier time with the tiller.

Third, the plow will go deeper into the ground than the tiller, which makes it easier for deeper-rooted plants like carrots and potatoes to find nice areas to grow into.

An inexpensive plow, like a middlebuster or potato plow, would do very well in this application. Then if you decide to plant potatoes, you have the right tool to harvest them. :thumbup1gif:

Next is tilling depth. You kind of figure this out as you gain experience, but essentially this breaks down again to how deep the root system needs to anchor itself. Cabbage has a bit deeper root system than corn and beans, but I can usually till the areas for all of these veggies to around 4"-6" and everyone is happy. Till too deep and your corn will fall over at the first good gust of wind.

Finally, the way you are storing it is fine, if you don't have to "wiggle" it to get it lined back up to your 3PH when reattaching. I actually leave mine sit on the tines due to space constraints in my shed. Every little bit of wiggle room is needed.

Hope this helps...
 

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Good points. A plow makes a big difference. The first time I didn't own a plow and it was slow and hard. Eventually I got down 6 plus and everything was nice. I used a friends plow on my second garden and that was much easier for all the reasons mentioned. I have lots of rocks and it's nice to find them before the tiller does.
 

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Sorry, sorta off topic, but those that have recommended using a plow on virgin ground before 'tilling, would a single bottom plow also work well?
 

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Sorry, sorta off topic, but those that have recommended using a plow on virgin ground before 'tilling, would a single bottom plow also work well?
Absolutely would. Single bottom plows are quite a bit larger and require more ponies to pull, but it should work fine on a 1023/1025. I had only suggested the middlebuster or potato plow due to their relatively low cost (about $125-$150 at Tractor Supply).
 

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Till too deep and your corn will fall over at the first good gust of wind.
Don't worry about the corn. I had a big wind come through and flatten all my corn one year and in a few days the corn will stand right back up. It may have a crook in it on the bottom but it will stand back up.
 

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Till too deep and your corn will fall over at the first good gust of wind.
Don't worry about the corn. I had a big wind come through and flatten all my corn one year and in a few days the corn will stand right back up. It may have a crook in it on the bottom but it will stand back up.
I wasn't so lucky last year. Mine got flattened by 70+MPH winds and never popped back up.:cray:
 

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I don't have the 3 point tiller, just a front tine manual one.

I set out a new garden this year and used the backhoe to break up the ground and find the rocks. I tried tilling some additional area that I hadn't broken up and found it next to impossible with my heavy clay and rock.

Your best bet is as those above have indicated. Break your area up with something, then use the tiller to get it crumbled up.
 

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Here's my experience with my RT1150. I have broken ground for six neighbors for gardens since I've got my tiller. Never could use my midlebuster as for some reason the tip of the buster is horizontal with the ground and it will not dig in hard ground and my top link is as short as it can be. Anyway, it workout ok for me every-time. I had it set-up at maximum dept and use 540 pto speed every-time I use it. My first pass is usually a little faster and as I start breaking the surface then I move to a slower pace. Four to six passes is usually what I needed. Now that being said, I agree with every one else, if you could plow it first it would be the best way but not necessary. As for my garden I always use max dept and 540 pto speed and yes I do have corn and the big wind will partly flatten them but they usually come back up sometime with a little bit of help from me. :thumbup1gif:
 

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I don't have the 3 point tiller, just a front tine manual one.

I set out a new garden this year and used the backhoe to break up the ground and find the rocks. I tried tilling some additional area that I hadn't broken up and found it next to impossible with my heavy clay and rock.

Your best bet is as those above have indicated. Break your area up with something, then use the tiller to get it crumbled up.
I broke up my garden area in 2011 with my front tine tiller. Got the job done in four days and couldn't lift my arms for 10 days after that. It found all the big rocks but I still have rocks that I know will go through my tiller on the 1025r.

To the OP
Take it slow, make sure the slip clutch is setup correctly or if no clutch, have lots of shear pins on hand. The 3pt tillers, no matter the brand, can take some abuse. If you are worried about hitting something either carry the tiller on 3pt and make multiple passes or use the depth gauges on the tiller. Breaking up the ground with a plow of some type first will make tilling easier but the tiller should not have a problem going through sod.


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Here's my experience with my RT1150. I have broken ground for six neighbors for gardens since I've got my tiller. Never could use my midlebuster as for some reason the tip of the buster is horizontal with the ground and it will not dig in hard ground and my top link is as short as it can be. Anyway, it workout ok for me every-time. I had it set-up at maximum dept and use 540 pto speed every-time I use it. My first pass is usually a little faster and as I start breaking the surface then I move to a slower pace. Four to six passes is usually what I needed. Now that being said, I agree with every one else, if you could plow it first it would be the best way but not necessary. As for my garden I always use max dept and 540 pto speed and yes I do have corn and the big wind will partly flatten them but they usually come back up sometime with a little bit of help from me. :thumbup1gif:
I'm like you, I only use the tiller when breaking ground. To get it to look like you have in the pics I have to till usually 4 to 6 times on fresh unbroken ground. I'll till one way then cross ways and do it again till I get it looking like your pics. As for your mid-buster, mine is a lot longer then yours, probably at least a foot or more. I've never used it to break ground but I think I'll try it as I going to break new ground next spring. Thinking about using the box blade with the hooks all the way down and see if will do any good. Kind of like chisel plowing. Who knows, might work. Be that time of the year where I'll be wanting a lot of seat time.:thumbup1gif: By the way Henri88, are you Superman? I don't see any tracks of your leaving the tractor. That ground is to soft for you not to leave tracks. Just say'in...
 

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I use my tiller to break ground all the time. One pass and it looks fluffy and ready to be planted. A word of advise. Have your tractor in 4x4. If the tiller wants to it'll push into your tractor picking the rear end up as you go. It'll surprise you and propel you forward quicker than you think. Lifting the 3 point stops the problem, but it can catch you off guard and put you into a bad situation.

-636
 

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I'm like you, I only use the tiller when breaking ground. To get it to look like you have in the pics I have to till usually 4 to 6 times on fresh unbroken ground. I'll till one way then cross ways and do it again till I get it looking like your pics. As for your mid-buster, mine is a lot longer then yours, probably at least a foot or more. I've never used it to break ground but I think I'll try it as I going to break new ground next spring. Thinking about using the box blade with the hooks all the way down and see if will do any good. Kind of like chisel plowing. Who knows, might work. Be that time of the year where I'll be wanting a lot of seat time.:thumbup1gif: By the way Henri88, are you Superman? I don't see any tracks of your leaving the tractor. That ground is to soft for you not to leave tracks. Just say'in...
I have a reverse rotation tiller. Only one time have I ever had to use something else to break the ground, and the ground was literally concrete, it will go to full depth on the first pass. I only have to go twice if I want a finer finish or if I really want to bury some trash. I've had packed caliche on a driveway that was way softer than this ground. Anyway, I used the box blade with the rippers down all the way. I went over it twice with the second time crossways. It worked great. They won't go as deep as a plow so it doesn't help the roots out any, but they do go deep enough to get a tiller through it. Again, I've inly had one place that I couldn't till and I till 2-3 houses a week.


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Well, maybe I'm mistaken about the plowing first, however I have very rocky ground here in Lancaster (my 3000 sq. ft house was built with the rocks found on our property in 1852). Anyway,I've found plowing new ground prior to tilling made the job go quick, since I'd only needed to go through 2 passes with the tiller after plowing and the plow would always find the "clunker's". Never broke a tine or shear pin yet.
 

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I'm like you, I only use the tiller when breaking ground. To get it to look like you have in the pics I have to till usually 4 to 6 times on fresh unbroken ground. I'll till one way then cross ways and do it again till I get it looking like your pics. As for your mid-buster, mine is a lot longer then yours, probably at least a foot or more. I've never used it to break ground but I think I'll try it as I going to break new ground next spring. Thinking about using the box blade with the hooks all the way down and see if will do any good. Kind of like chisel plowing. Who knows, might work. Be that time of the year where I'll be wanting a lot of seat time.:thumbup1gif: By the way Henri88, are you Superman? I don't see any tracks of your leaving the tractor. That ground is to soft for you not to leave tracks. Just say'in...
Nope, not Superman, but the jump was really something. :laugh:
 
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