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Discussion Starter #1
Just about finished refurbishing an equipment trailer for hauling my 1025r. The trailer is a 78"x14' plus 2' dove tail 7000lb gvwr equipment trailer. It has stake pockets all around for securing loads.

I have plenty of 5/8" chain and binders and am just looking for input on how it gets chained to the trailer. Where you attach to the tractor, how many chains, etc.
 

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5/8" chain sounds like overkill to me. I use two 2 inch x 10 foot lengths of strapping on the front, with one end hooked over the front weight bar and then to the front corners of the trailer when hauling my 1025R. On the back, I use two 3 inch x 10 foot lengths of strapping hooked to the drawbar on one end and the other end hooked on the sides near the back of the trailer. All have ratchet tightening. This gives me cross bracing and front/rear bracing at the same time. If I had a loader (maybe someday), I would put another strap across the loader from side to side. The 3 inch straps were originally 30 feet long, but I cut hem down to a more manageable length.

Dave
 

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Ddinham's system is what I do with most equipment, and 5/16" chain should be plenty for your tractor.

For the 1025/6, they're light enough you would be okay with a single chain front and rear. Use a clevis in the drawbar and run the chain through that, and over the weight bracket or maybe behind the brush guard in front of you have a loader.
 

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I use two heavy duty ratchet straps when tying mine to the trailer. I install a clevis on the drawbar for the rear strap and the other strap goes on the front (been awhile since I've hauled so don't remember what I wrapped the strap around, sorry). It hasn't fallen off yet. :lol:
 
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In my state you are supposed to also secure any attachment. So something on the loader and hoe, be it straps or chain.
 

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I originally thought I would also use the clevis on the drawbar for the rear connections, but after considerable thought, I did not like the fact that the tractor could move side to side that way. So, I came up with the idea of putting the hook in one of the holes in the drawbar. This requires two straps on each end, instead of one, but I like it much better. I have the Omni Hitch drawbar with the 2 inch receiver and it also has two holes where I place the hooks.

So it takes me 4 straps to tie it down, but I feel much more confident this way.

Dave
 

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With the clevis in the drawbar and your chains pulling at the appropriate angle to the rear, sideways shifting shouldn't be a problem. More chains/ straps are better, but I've hauled a lot of equipment with a single chain across one end and never experienced a problem with shifting. It's even permissible by DOT regulations for equipment weighing less than 5,000 lbs to use a single chain per end, though DOT regs don't usually apply to private individuals.
 

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It might be overkill but since it is what I have, I use it. Four chains with binders, two on the front frame bracket left & right, two on the backhoe subframe left & right, pairs crossed & attached to the trailer tie down points. Then a 2" webbing strap across the fel bucket. Chains are two grade 70 5/16" and two grade 43 3/8", so working load limit is fairly comparable in that any one could hold the whole load...

Nick
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the replies. I like the clevis in the draw bar under the PTO but need to get the BH on to see if it is still accessible.

The other issue I am seeing is trying to keep chains off paint. I can hook to the weight bracket but either have to go over the bucket or around. Either will strip paint real quick.
 

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Chains are hard on paint, and there isn't a lot you can do if you're hooking the chain hook directly to the machine.

If the chain runs over part of the machine, you can put something between the chain and the equipment. Cardboard works okay, but I love used fire hose for that. Old, trashed fire hose cut into 6-8" pieces and slid over your straps and chains go a long way toward preventing finish damage on the equipment and excessive wear on cargo straps, especially when they have to cross sharp corners.
 

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I use 4 heavy duty ratchet straps with a short piece of chain on the ends. In front I hook to the frame/weight bracket. On the rear I hook to the frame/draw bar plate.
 

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While I don't tow my tractor much yet, I have towed my a Jeep all over the country. I had always ran 4 primary straps, all as short as possible and as straight as I can get it. If any of them break or loosen up the other three will keep the load still. Crossing straps or coming across the trailer at a sharp angle will just create a lot of slack if the other side fails. If it's going to be a long haul I also usually run a safety single to the rear receiver in case I need to stop quick.

The last couple years I have been running tire slings, one over each of the four tires and since them down tight directly to side rub rails. With this setup I always run the safety single strap to the receiver too.

$.02

Jim
 

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Here's a pic of the straps I'm talking about. Jeep is on 40's and the straps fit great.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1387247197.796141.jpg

Jim
 
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