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I have a 1949 Ford 9N that had issues with sparking. I replaced the coil and everything in the distributor itself. Once I got the gap set to .015” I took a power probe and set the ground on the body and the power point in the screw that hold the condenser wire down. With the distributor out of the tractor whenn I rotate the crank shaft the ground never goes away wether the points are together or separated. I can’t figure out if this is normal or not but the tractor still has no spark. Any suggestions?
 

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Go here - there are manuals you can download: NTC Manual Library

BTW, Ford did not make a 9N in 1949. They were made from 1939 to 1941, and in 1942 they made the 2N, and in 1948, the 8N. Also, all 9Ns and 2Ns serial numbers started with "9N" or "9NAN".
 

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I have a 1949 Ford 9N that had issues with sparking. I replaced the coil and everything in the distributor itself. Once I got the gap set to .015” I took a power probe and set the ground on the body and the power point in the screw that hold the condenser wire down. With the distributor out of the tractor whenn I rotate the crank shaft the ground never goes away wether the points are together or separated. I can’t figure out if this is normal or not but the tractor still has no spark. Any suggestions?
We need a little better explanation of what you are trying to accomplish here. If you have the distributor out then turn the crankshaft nothing is going to happen. You could hook an ohm meter between the wire connection on the points and the distributor body and turn the distributor shaft and watch the meter. If the meter sweeps between 0 ohms and infinity as you turn the shaft the points are working. Did you have voltage to the distributor when the distributor was installed in the engine?
 
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