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wish they would have come out with this last year b/4 I bought my 250.

Ford took to the 2017 North American International Auto Show to one-up its crosstown rival, General Motors. While both the 2017 Chevrolet Silverado and 2017 GMC Sierra match the Ford F-150 in more ways than not, the blue oval pulled a wild card out: the introduction of a 3.0-liter Power Stroke diesel engine.
With the introduction of the 3.0-liter Power Stroke V6 diesel engine, it leaves General Motors as the odd man out. Both Ford and Ram now offer a half-ton diesel powertrain for their bread and butter pickups
Ford Reveals 3.0L V6 Diesel F-150 | GM Authority
 

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If this engine works its way into either the new ranger or new bronco, I might have to abandon my 'no new trucks' rule. Although I agree that an expedition powered by a little diesel would be pretty awesome to. Other than my Deere, lawnmower, chainsaw, etc, we are a diesel family; I have my PowerStroke and Mrs. Evergreen drives a VW TDI. Once you go #2, you don't go back!

I see the initial cost of purchasing a diesel to pay for itself in the long run in many respects:
1) It is safer. Unlike gasoline, diesel won't burn/explode in a really bad crash. Apparently this is also one of the drawbacks for electric car batteries as well.
2) Better MPG than a comparable gasoline counterpart. I can get 20mpg highway in my truck (empty) and 15mpg highway with my slide in camper or while towing 10k pounds... compared to 12/7mpg in a gas SuperDuty. The wife can get 44mpg highway in her VW and it is a full-size Passat Station Wagon, not some little Golf or Jetta.
3) The power curve of a diesel is more efficient. A gas truck engine makes peak power near the top of its rev-range... Yes, it may make more power, but try driving for a day with the tach buried at 6k rpm and let me know how that turns out! A diesel makes its peak power in the middle of the rev range... Right where the engine is turning at highway speed. I bought a truck that makes 765 ft-lbs of torque, and at 65 mph I have access to each and every foot-pound without the need to downshift.
4) Diesels tend to last longer. Maybe it is because they are built out of beefier components. Maybe it is because most people who paid extra for a diesel power plant and have a reason to have them take better care of them. Whatever the reason, my experience has been that as long as the body holds together, a diesel truck is pretty hard to kill if you take care of it. (Note that the old Ford 300ci straight six is one of the few exceptions!)
5) Raw power... because I am a juvenile delinquent at heart. Once a diesel has spooled up its turbo, it transforms into a beast. I'm not into the whole blow-black-smoke thing, but it is great fun to blow the doors off a two-door hatchback with a vehicle capable of carrying said hatchback in its bed. Even our mild-mannered little VW is more than capable of fullsized burnouts... I found that out by accident one day while trying to merge into heavy traffic.
6) I don't have a child of my own yet, but if anyone knows of a faster way to make a kid fall asleep than to go for a ride in a diesel truck, I'm all ears. My sister-in-laws kid usually takes less than 4 miles before she is out like a light. This also works to calm down dogs who have anxiety problems, and I do have several of those.

I wish more auto makers would get on board with diesel powered vehicles of all kinds. Everywhere else in the world has embraced the Diesel engine, but for some reason the only segment that it hasn't really caught on in America is the automotive sector. It probably has something to do with the perception that diesel is a dirty fuel, and the Oldsmobile 350 diesel of the late 1970's/80's being such a flop... Only one of those is true!
 

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Maybe one of the refinery workers who are members can explain this better, but the transition to ultra low sulfur diesel fuel apparently adds additional refinement time and cost and has diesel selling for much more than regular unleaded gas. very difficult to get a return on the high cost of the diesel engine purchase now. Of course many are enthusiasts, including myself and sacrifice to purchase a diesel vehicle anyway.
 

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Maybe one of the refinery workers who are members can explain this better, but the transition to ultra low sulfur diesel fuel apparently adds additional refinement time and cost and has diesel selling for much more than regular unleaded gas. very difficult to get a return on the high cost of the diesel engine purchase now. Of course many are enthusiasts, including myself and sacrifice to purchase a diesel vehicle anyway.
Here is one reason!

The United States federal excise tax on gasoline is 18.4 cents per gallon and 24.4 cents per gallon for diesel fuel.
 

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Sweet, give it a year to work the bugs out, then throw it in the Expedition and I'm in.
By then the wife will need a new ride.
Betcha the same people that went after VW, Audi and Ram/Fiat SA for "emission cheating" already have their party planned for Ford.

It's tough to get the light duty Diesels to meet the ever tightening EPA regulations. The >8510 GVW pickups have a much easier time as the HD designation means a different set of standards.
 

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Betcha the same people that went after VW, Audi and Ram/Fiat SA for "emission cheating" already have their party planned for Ford.

It's tough to get the light duty Diesels to meet the ever tightening EPA regulations. The >8510 GVW pickups have a much easier time as the HD designation means a different set of standards.
Probably, and it seems to take Ford awhile to update the Expedition anyway.
I mean, they kept the 5.4L in it for 3-4 years after the Ecoboost and 5.0L were in the F150s. :banghead:
 

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maybe you wont have to pull the cab off to work on it:banghead:
 

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maybe you wont have to pull the cab off to work on it:banghead:
I follow a tech on the utubes that seldom lifts the cab. It is unreal what he goes through pulling the headlights, grill, multiple coolers and core supports to pull engines. I have a 6.7, and pray nothing ever goes wrong but man let me tell you the power is incredible.
 

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Probably, and it seems to take Ford awhile to update the Expedition anyway.
I mean, they kept the 5.4L in it for 3-4 years after the Ecoboost and 5.0L were in the F150s. :banghead:
A certain person I know in Michigan remarked to me that the market in the middle east demanded the 5.4 in the expedition. This same person was driving a 3.5L V6 ecoboost expedition at the time. This was back in 2011 or so. I almost bought a 5.4 2010 expedition. Sometimes I wish I had. I went with the F150 instead. I needed the bed.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I follow a tech on the utubes that seldom lifts the cab. It is unreal what he goes through pulling the headlights, grill, multiple coolers and core supports to pull engines. I have a 6.7, and pray nothing ever goes wrong but man let me tell you the power is incredible.
could you post the tech's name so I can follow a few, incredible power is not the word, I love when the turbo really spools up, sounds like a 4 barrel kicking in, does the same to the fuel tank as the 4 barrel did. :bigthumb:
 

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Betcha the same people that went after VW, Audi and Ram/Fiat SA for "emission cheating" already have their party planned for Ford.

It's tough to get the light duty Diesels to meet the ever tightening EPA regulations. The >8510 GVW pickups have a much easier time as the HD designation means a different set of standards.
I'm not a scientist, but there has to be a trade off between a little more tail pipe pollution and decreasing emissions from having to produce and refine significantly less oil. If we were to cut even 5% of oil consumption by switching to diesel, that has to be worth something. Right?
 

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could you post the tech's name so I can follow a few, incredible power is not the word, I love when the turbo really spools up, sounds like a 4 barrel kicking in, does the same to the fuel tank as the 4 barrel did. :bigthumb:
flmmaz is the tech who works in a old dirty dealership in the Carolina's I think. He has a lot of excellent video's and pulls a few diesels out of the front of the truck. He looks scattered, but if you watch him a bit you learn that he has been there and done that and has skills to share. He shows quite a bit of whatever Ford's laptop program is and the kind of information they can capture and diagnose with when they plug in.

Powerstroke tech talk w/Arod is another great utube channel. This youngster works at an immaculate Ford dealership and has a lot of good clean video's of diagnostics and component replacements. He shows work on other vehicles as well but he has a few good diesel part change procedures where he shows how to remove the minimum to get where you have to. You know how these trucks are built like jigsaw puzzles now. Modern diesels are truly engineering masterpieces these days. Most of what makes the interwebs are the problems so many folks don't have respect for them.
 
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