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Hauling my 3046r w/front loader and box blade to our new place 400+ miles away. Have a 22' finish line BP tilt bed and 3/4 GMC 6l. Are there easy ways to figure out the best placement of the tractor on the trailer?

Rear tires are fluid filled on tractor - how does that change the equations?
 

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This is one of those "fly by the seat of your pants" thing. Best you can do is make sure you keep significant weight on the tongue. Measure the drop at the hitch of the tow vehicle before and after loading to get an idea of the weight added. Better a little too much tongue weight than too little.

Dave

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With my 955 with loaded tires on my 14' trailer without the FEL, I center the tractor rear axle just ahead of the tandem axle centerline, not quite over the front axle. With the FEL, I have to load it backwards, and place the center of the tractor over the front axle. With the box blade, you may want to move it ahead slightly, but i wouldn't go too far. As the previous poster noted this is a seat of your pants thing until you get comfortable with it.

You have the advantage of a long deck that I don't have but wish I had with my trailer.

Dave
 

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This is one of those "fly by the seat of your pants" thing. Best you can do is make sure you keep significant weight on the tongue. Measure the drop at the hitch of the tow vehicle before and after loading to get an idea of the weight added. Better a little too much tongue weight than too little.

Dave

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Agreed.
 

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This is one of those "fly by the seat of your pants" thing. Best you can do is make sure you keep significant weight on the tongue. Measure the drop at the hitch of the tow vehicle before and after loading to get an idea of the weight added. Better a little too much tongue weight than too little.
Measure the "squat" in the rear of the tow vehicle by measuring the height of the rear wheel wells. Also measure the change in height of the front wheel wells.

You want the tongue weight to be as "correct" as possible - too little and you're going to have problems with acceleration and the rear end of the tow vehicle being stable. Too much and you're going to have issues with steering and braking.

You'll need to load it up and drive it to see how it feels unless you can get everything to a set of scales.
 

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I like the scale.

I learnt to cross, but not to twist, safety chains later in life, contrary to how the U-Haul guy once connected their trailer to our truck.

https://mechanicalelements.com/twisting-safety-chains/
Thanks. I tow this trailer with 3 different vehicles. This is the shortest chain length, the other two vehicle chain hook points require longer safety chains. Ideally, I'd need three sets of safety chains, and would have to unbolt one set and bolt on a new set every time I changed tow trucks.

I checked on line about regulations and recomendations, and using a pair of zip ties to shorten the chains without twisting is a recommended way.

Is this OK?

IMG-1085.JPG
 

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I have a tilt deck trailer, 20ft. Like most tilt trailers I have seen the wheels are placed farther forward on the frame to allow a better pivot point for the tilt. This means that the load has to be placed farther forward than normal. Too little tongue weight on my trailer and it tows like crap, too much, well, I don't think I've ever had too much with that trailer......

As long as the rear wheels of the tractor are equal or forward of the rear most trailer axle you should be good to go.
 
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