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Anyone know if these forks would work on an Artillian Frame for a JD 1025r? I know nothing about forks or anything. Are they all standard? I would imagine there are different sizes like cat0,1,2 on 3 point hitches?

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Fork dimensions

I think that's a class 3 fork based on the information here:
https://store.intellaliftparts.com/FAQS.html

Artillian probably states which class forks they use but I would bet on class 1 for compact/subcompact tractors.

Treefarmer
 
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Artillian lists their forks as "ITA Class II Type".

So I guess the starting point would be figuring out the ITA Class Type for your forks.
 
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Ahhh shoot. Looks like they won't work then! Was worth a shot! Thanks for the info!
 

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Here is the info on the Artillian frames: Technical Information

Those look super heavy, especially at 5” wide.
 

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Boy ... At 5" x 42" ... because of the weight, they would be a struggle just trying to manhandle them onto the frame, I'm thinkin :flag_of_truce: ...
 

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Boy ... At 5" x 42" ... because of the weight, they would be a struggle just trying to manhandle them onto the frame, I'm thinkin :flag_of_truce: ...
You are right about that. I originally had a set of 4" x 42" Cascade tines for my Artillian frame and at around 80 lbs. they were a handful. I suspect these 5" tines would be over 100 lbs.

However, there is a trick to installing tines without manually lifting them. It is used by forklift operators that have to manipulate heavy duty tines that weigh hundreds of pounds each.

You slide both tines to the middle of the frame so they are in front of the cutout on the lower part of the frame. Then lay something like a 4x4 out in front of the fork frame about 2/3 of the way out the tine, perpendicular to the tines. You then lower the fork frame and the forks will unhook themselves from the lower support. As you continue to lower the fork frame it will detach from the top hook on the tine. The tines will stay upright sitting on the floor waiting for you to reattach them in reverse order. If your fork frame only has a narrow notch on the bottom you will have to unhook one tine at a time.

I'm probably not explaining this correctly but I think you will get the idea.
 

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If your fork frame only has a narrow notch on the bottom you will have to unhook one tine at a time.

I'm probably not explaining this correctly but I think you will get the idea.
That was a good explanation!

With a narrow notch, I used to unhook the first tine and slide it over a bit to one side while still hooked on the top. Then move the second tine to the notch, and use the same technique as you described. Gotta be careful because the tines will be a slightly different angle. If you want to match the angle, then unhook the bottom of the second tine as you did the first and slide over a bit in the opposite direction. Sliding the tines while still hooked to the top is a lot easier than muscling them off.

Just my 2 lazy cents.
 

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You are right!

You are right about that. I originally had a set of 4" x 42" Cascade tines for my Artillian frame and at around 80 lbs. they were a handful. I suspect these 5" tines would be over 100 lbs.

However, there is a trick to installing tines without manually lifting them. It is used by forklift operators that have to manipulate heavy duty tines that weigh hundreds of pounds each.

You slide both tines to the middle of the frame so they are in front of the cutout on the lower part of the frame. Then lay something like a 4x4 out in front of the fork frame about 2/3 of the way out the tine, perpendicular to the tines. You then lower the fork frame and the forks will unhook themselves from the lower support. As you continue to lower the fork frame it will detach from the top hook on the tine. The tines will stay upright sitting on the floor waiting for you to reattach them in reverse order. If your fork frame only has a narrow notch on the bottom you will have to unhook one tine at a time.

I'm probably not explaining this correctly but I think you will get the idea.
You've explained it well and the technique works well unless you bump a tine and it falls over or, you have to drop the tines on a soft surface and . . . (drum roll) it falls over.

Don't ask me how I know about those experiences. . . Let's just say sometimes my life doesn't go perfectly.

Treefarmer
 
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