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Hey folks

The longer I get into this endeavor (nearly a whole two weeks now) with my 1025r, the more uses I'm finding for forks around the place.

From schlepping a cage with large rocks, to lifting out stakes already pounded into the ground, to stacking lumber, brush, moving a bagster to the curb.... its becoming very clear to me forks will be on the front of Bambi more than the bucket.

I know less about forks than I know about, well, pretty much anything other implement or attachment.

I see Artillian has several lengths. Moving pallets of stuff (feed, bricks, whatever) is very low on my list - they'll mostly be creating a platform to move other stuff, lift brush, trash, etc.

I also see they're now offering fork extensions - this I like very much, as I can get two lengths, essentially without the investment or space of two full sets.

I'd appreciate any thoughts on your experience with fork length... should I be looking at the full on serving forks, or will the salad forks work fine.

:)

- Ken
 

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I have the 36" forks. Ive had them for only a couple months but seem to be the perfect size. I've moved logs, pallets, brush and even done a little digging. The Artillian forks are awesome! They will stay on my tractor most of the time.
Everything Corey said, just the right size for the tractor and the Artillian forks are tops!!:bigthumb:

I had clamp on 4' forks before Artillian, too big and too far forward.

Just my opinion . . . . :cowboy:
 

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Titan sent me the 42" forks by mistake but now I'm glad they did. So far I have not run into a situation where the extra 6" is a problem.
 

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42" Titans on mine.
When unloading an actual pallet from the truck that length has been nice to have but has still been easy enough to maneuver inside my barn.
 

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I'd appreciate any thoughts on your experience with fork length... should I be looking at the full on serving forks, or will the salad forks work fine.
I have the Artillian setup with 42" forks. I would not want to go any shorter for my only set of forks. First, any shorter and it'd be hard to see the tips in a lot of cases. With the 42" forks, I can usually see the tips over the top of the back frame. Shorter forks would hide from me more often. Second, I picked up a pallet loaded with sandbags the other day that was slightly too far away for me to pick up properly. The last 8-10" of the pallet hung over the tips of the forks. Picked it up, backed up into a pretty big bump and the bounce caused the pallet to break. I put it down, slid all the way under the broken pallet, and was able to pick it back up and keep working. Couldn't do that with the 36" forks.

Now, I bolded "only" up there because I also want a set of 24" Landscaping forks. The 42" forks are a little cumbersome to use to pry stuff up and also are so long you don't have as much prying power as you would with the 24" forks. I definitely want to add the 24" forks as soon as I can afford to.
 

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I would get a set of long ones (I have the 42's from Artillian) and a set of shorts if you plan on using it as a pry bar to dig up roots/bushes etc. I use my forks primarily for moving pallets or big stuff I get from a store (think big heavy stuff like appliances or new attachments for my tractor etc) and do not want to man handle out of my truck. I think you find that you will use the forks to move pallets more than you think. The long ones are also good for moving brush/branches etc.

If most of your work is going to involve that sort of thing, you should look at a Artillian grapple. Yes, it is a lot more money than a set of forks but the use you get out of it for landscaping/brush removal/etc is way more than you would get from a set of forks. I have one of their grapples as well on a 2210 a forerunner of the 1 series. It works great and will cause you to think of more projects than you thought possible.

Bottom line is you won't be able to get one attachment to do it all so think carefully about what you do most and size the tool for the job, unless of course you don't mind spending money on green stuff. If that's the case then clear out Artillian's store, it will make the both of you happy...:laugh::laugh::laugh:
 

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I have a small(er) space, and when I do custom work, it is typically in small(er) yards. I have the 36" forks, and have never seen the need for the extra 6" (to 42").
There are times that even the 36" seem to "stick way out there" when trying to make a tight turn.

These tractors don't lift that much, especially on the tips of the forks way out in front of the tractor. I don't see the need for longer forks. Just adds weight, and makes it more difficult to turn in a tight space.

I know that others feel differently, but I'm not sure if any/many of them have used the 36" length. Is there REALLY a task which the 42" can accomplish which cannot be done with the 36"?

Bigger is not always better.

Tim
 

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I have a small(er) space, and when I do custom work, it is typically in small(er) yards. I have the 36" forks, and have never seen the need for the extra 6" (to 42").
There are times that even the 36" seem to "stick way out there" when trying to make a tight turn.

These tractors don't lift that much, especially on the tips of the forks way out in front of the tractor. I don't see the need for longer forks. Just adds weight, and makes it more difficult to turn in a tight space.

I know that others feel differently, but I'm not sure if any/many of them have used the 36" length. Is there REALLY a task which the 42" can accomplish which cannot be done with the 36"?

Bigger is not always better.

Tim
Tim summed up my feelings well. I also have 36" Artillian's.

Perfect length in my opinion. Lifts pallets, handles brush, easy in tight places, lighter that 42 for a bit more capacity.... \
That 6 inches can help in removing a pallet from a truck bed that is out of reach of 36 inch forks... I just use a chain and the slots on the Artillian frame if it is too far forward.
 

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I have a small(er) space, and when I do custom work, it is typically in small(er) yards. I have the 36" forks, and have never seen the need for the extra 6" (to 42").
There are times that even the 36" seem to "stick way out there" when trying to make a tight turn.

These tractors don't lift that much, especially on the tips of the forks way out in front of the tractor. I don't see the need for longer forks. Just adds weight, and makes it more difficult to turn in a tight space.

I know that others feel differently, but I'm not sure if any/many of them have used the 36" length. Is there REALLY a task which the 42" can accomplish which cannot be done with the 36"?

Bigger is not always better.

Tim
I've said the exact same thing many times in fork threads around here.

One of the biggest arguments people have is reaching into the back of a pick-up. Well only have a 5'5" bed but I can easily reach and grab anything in the front of the bed. But if you had an 8' bed, it's so easy just to grab 1/2 the pallet, lift it an inch or so, and drag it back to where you can get a full bite.

On my 2520 I find the 36" a perfect size - they even look appropriate in length in comparison to the tractor. Seeing 42" & 48" forks on 1 series tractors just looks so out of balance - but that's just the way I look at things.....

P1330452.jpg
 

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Is there REALLY a task which the 42" can accomplish which cannot be done with the 36"?
Go up 3-ish posts and read my comments. Yes, I've run into a situation where I needed to support a pallet all the way to the far edge and that required the 42" tines. All depends on if you have enough pressure at the far edge of the pallet to risk breaking the pallet if you hit a bump and bounce.
 

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The 42" forks are a little cumbersome to use to pry stuff up and also are so long you don't have as much prying power as you would with the 24" forks.
I am not arguing that a set of 24" forks are not a good thing to have but I will disagree about the lower prying power. With the long forks you can stick half of them in the ground and then pry in the same manner as using a shovel - the fulcrum is halfway up the fork, not the pivot point of the loader. The longer the fork, the greater prying force you can get. With short forks the only prying power you get is from curling.
 

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I am not arguing that a set of 24" forks are not a good thing to have but I will disagree about the lower prying power. With the long forks you can stick half of them in the ground and then pry in the same manner as using a shovel - the fulcrum is halfway up the fork, not the pivot point of the loader. The longer the fork, the greater prying force you can get. With short forks the only prying power you get is from curling.
This is true
 

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I am not arguing that a set of 24" forks are not a good thing to have but I will disagree about the lower prying power. With the long forks you can stick half of them in the ground and then pry in the same manner as using a shovel - the fulcrum is halfway up the fork, not the pivot point of the loader. The longer the fork, the greater prying force you can get. With short forks the only prying power you get is from curling.
Except the point of application of load is then the tip of the fork (since it's stuck in the dirt). That makes a long lever from the tip of the fork to the pivot point where the back of the fork is rolling across the ground meaning that you lose mechanical advantage. In your scenario, the ratio of the distance from the ground-pivot to the tip vs the ground-pivot to the pivot pin for the curl action is what determines how much force you can exert. If you've stuck the forks down into the ground to get under something, the bad side of the teeter-totter is always going to have the fat kid sitting on it.
 

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...the point of application of load is then the tip of the fork (since it's stuck in the dirt). That makes a long lever from the tip of the fork to the pivot point where the back of the fork is rolling across the ground meaning that you lose mechanical advantage.
Just like with a shovel, the tip that is in the ground is where the force is realized - the back of the shovel (fork) acts against the ground making a fulcrum and the handle (tractor) is where the force is applied. You gain tremendous mechanical advantage. It's like instead of a person on the shovel handle you have an entire tractor.

You don't stick the forks in the ground and then just curl to get the job done, you use the weight of the tractor by lowering the boom - and a bit of curl. That's a much greater force than curling alone. If we were strictly curling then yes, long forks would be worse than short ones.
 
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Just like with a shovel, the tip that is in the ground is where the force is realized - the back of the shovel (fork) acts against the ground making a fulcrum and the handle (tractor) is where the force is applied. You gain tremendous mechanical advantage. It's like instead of a person on the shovel handle you have an entire tractor.

You don't stick the forks in the ground and then just curl to get the job done, you use the weight of the tractor by lowering the boom - and a bit of curl. That's a much greater force than curling alone. If we were strictly curling then yes, long forks would be worse than short ones.
Again, what you say is only true if the amount of fork in the ground is less than the amount of fork out of the ground. Basically, if the fat kid is sitting on your side of the see-saw. You compare the ratio of the length from the tip of the fork to where it exits the ground to the length from the point where it exits the ground back to the pivot point of the curl action to determine the mechanical advantage of the lever. If the bit in free air is longer, you have mechanical advantage. If the bit stuck in the ground is longer, you have mechanical disadvantage. To use your shovel analogy, if you've got the forks stuck half way into the ground, it's like trying to use a shovel where the handle is only as long as the blade (which wouldn't work very well). For the 42" long forks, if you've got them stuck more than 21" into the dirt, you'd be better off with the 24" forks and relying on straight curl since at least you wouldn't have mechanical disadvantage. For the 36" forks, that tipping point is just 18" of penetration. I guess it all depends on if you're trying to tip a paving stone (minimal penetration), or shove the forks clear under a bush (lots of penetration depth required).
 
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