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Hi all,
Last year I struggled with chains, trying to find a way to put them on the rear R4 tires that didn't completely suck. I failed (I put them on, but all the ways I used sucked). This year, I stumbled on a way that was amazingly easy. When I was done, I was like, "Wait, that's it? I'm done??"

The way is simple:

1. Jack up the rear of the 1025r (put jack stands in place for safety).
2. Engage the parking brake. This is the key!
3. Drape the chains over the tires, spread them out and fasten them.

The key is the parking brake. If you jack up the tractor without it, the tires will spin and the heavy chains will fall off when you try to put them on. This method is absurdly easy.

Hope this helps some of you.
 

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I do something similar with my 2720. I use a floor jack and only jack up one tire at a time and since it is only 2" off the ground I don't use jack stands. I'm never under any part of the tractor or tire. Instead of the parking brake I simply put the tractor in gear and that prevents the tire from spinning. I find it is easier to reach over and bump it into gear rather than trying to apply the parking brake with my hand. I lay the chain on the floor under the tire and then take a motorcycle tie-down strap, hook it to the ends of the chain and then just pull the chain up around the tire as it rotates. When it gets around to where I can latch it I bump the range selector into gear and that holds the tire in place.

I then lower the jack and repeat on the other tire.

My chains probably weigh 80+ lbs per tire and this is the easiest method I have come up with so far.
 

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I do something similar with my 2720. I use a floor jack and only jack up one tire at a time and since it is only 2" off the ground I don't use jack stands. I'm never under any part of the tractor or tire. Instead of the parking brake I simply put the tractor in gear and that prevents the tire from spinning. I find it is easier to reach over and bump it into gear rather than trying to apply the parking brake with my hand. I lay the chain on the floor under the tire and then take a motorcycle tie-down strap, hook it to the ends of the chain and then just pull the chain up around the tire as it rotates. When it gets around to where I can latch it I bump the range selector into gear and that holds the tire in place.

I then lower the jack and repeat on the other tire.

My chains probably weigh 80+ lbs per tire and this is the easiest method I have come up with so far.
Similar process here. No way I could even think about lifting those chains up over the tire.
 

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Been jacking my tractor up for the past 18 yrs, on wheel at a time off the ground .No jack stands , lift chains up over the tire, hook the inside of the chain together , then tighten the outside , put on spreaders, done.
 

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That all sounds like a lot of work! I took a piece of scrap OSB ad screwed some 2x3 pieces to it.

Lay the chain across through the gaps, back the tractor over it, flip the chain over the tire and hook together. Drive the tractor off and do the same thing on the other side. No jack required.

20171211_163521.jpg
 

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That all sounds like a lot of work! I took a piece of scrap OSB ad screwed some 2x3 pieces to it.

Lay the chain across through the gaps, back the tractor over it, flip the chain over the tire and hook together. Drive the tractor off and do the same thing on the other side. No jack required.

View attachment 506793
According to the picture shown you are about to put your chains on backwards (hooks facing inwards).
 

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That all sounds like a lot of work! I took a piece of scrap OSB ad screwed some 2x3 pieces to it.

Lay the chain across through the gaps, back the tractor over it, flip the chain over the tire and hook together. Drive the tractor off and do the same thing on the other side. No jack required.

View attachment 506793
Ain’t no flipping up over for me. i have to use the tire turing to feed the chain up over.
 

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Having/leaving two extra links on the outside side chain makes life good also. Hookup loose, tighten one link at a time as you adjust the chain set.
 

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According to the picture shown you are about to put your chains on backwards (hooks facing inwards).
I'm not putting them on. :laugh: I just laid chains out so people could see how the board works.
 

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I deflate the tire some put the chains on as tight as I can then air then back up.Never had a problem with loose chains.
 

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I deflate the tire some put the chains on as tight as I can then air then back up.Never had a problem with loose chains.
The bigger the tire the less effect that has. Plus R4 tires are a lot stiffer than turfs. But your method is sound for smaller tires for sure.
 

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Hi all,
Last year I struggled with chains, trying to find a way to put them on the rear R4 tires that didn't completely suck. I failed (I put them on, but all the ways I used sucked). This year, I stumbled on a way that was amazingly easy. When I was done, I was like, "Wait, that's it? I'm done??"

The way is simple:

1. Jack up the rear of the 1025r (put jack stands in place for safety).
2. Engage the parking brake. This is the key!
3. Drape the chains over the tires, spread them out and fasten them.

The key is the parking brake. If you jack up the tractor without it, the tires will spin and the heavy chains will fall off when you try to put them on. This method is absurdly easy.

Hope this helps some of you.
Yep pretty much how I do it except put in gear then I can bump in neutral to rotate tire. I also let air out and then re inflate to proper psi to get them tight.
 

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I just ordered 2-link chains this morning from www.tirechains.com for the 3720, just wanted to have them in case-I used the ones on my old 4110 a few times in really deep snow and they where great to have in addition to the tire grooving.

I just got a email from UPS that they should be delivered tomorrow-wow that's great service!

These will be the heaviest chains I've every wrestled, so any and all tricks I read are helpful!:

UPS Service:UPS GROUND
Number of Packages:3
Package Weight:206.0 LBS
Scheduled Delivery:12/12/2017
 

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JimR's block thing looks just plain silly!:lol::laugh::yahoo: (Although... I still have a 13 year old set of 'em!):laugh:

Since I only have non loaded tiny little 26x12x12 and 24x12x12's I still jack and block the machine by the receiver hitch and buzz the wheels off 1 at a time with my DeWalt 'lectric impact wrench. This year I reduced the air to 10psi and put the chains on... slightly easier to get the slack out (the tire did grow some going back to 20psi.)

With the tire on the ground I just drape the chains over the tire, hook the inside to pre marked links and then work the outside hook/adjuster to a pre marked link.

When removing the wheel, I used piece of thin wood about the same space as the chains will need when reinstalling the tire and drop the wheel onto it. Reinstalling the wheel on this spacer will line up lug holes much easier since the cross links will lift the tire up to the hub and it's easier to catch the first lug bolt.

I also tag my chains left and right when I take them off in the spring, the side chains work out to different lengths on each side. Tires ain't quite equal circumference by 2 links.

NOW... Does anyone else think JD could have given us mortals just a bit more hub to hang the wheel on? How much metal did they $ave flush fitting the hub in$ide the wheel....?:nunu:
 

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I just ordered 2-link chains this morning from www.tirechains.com for the 3720, just wanted to have them in case-I used the ones on my old 4110 a few times in really deep snow and they where great to have in addition to the tire grooving.

I just got a email from UPS that they should be delivered tomorrow-wow that's great service!

These will be the heaviest chains I've every wrestled, so any and all tricks I read are helpful!:

UPS Service:UPS GROUND
Number of Packages:3
Package Weight:206.0 LBS
Scheduled Delivery:12/12/2017
I thought Oops didn't deliver anything over 75-pounds. :dunno:
 

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I deflate the tire some put the chains on as tight as I can then air then back up.Never had a problem with loose chains.
I use the same method.:good2:
I air down to about 5 psi.
 

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Oddly enough I just put my chains on last night.
The method I used was.
Jack up the back of the tractor.
Then let all the air out of both tires.
Draped the end of one chain over the tire.
Spin the wheel front and back to get the chains even.
Hook the back and then latch the front.
Put the tires back to 10 psi.
Let the jack down.
 

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I have used the block method, and it does work. However, I find it quicker to jack up the tractor , lay the chain on the tire and roll the chain ends to the bottom of the tire and hook them there . This is on a concrete floor. When I have to install chains on soft ground will use a block or simply drive on the chains and do whatever it takes to get them on.
 

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JimR's block thing looks just plain silly!:lol::laugh::yahoo: (Although... I still have a 13 year old set of 'em!):laugh:

Since I only have non loaded tiny little 26x12x12 and 24x12x12's I still jack and block the machine by the receiver hitch and buzz the wheels off 1 at a time with my DeWalt 'lectric impact wrench. This year I reduced the air to 10psi and put the chains on... slightly easier to get the slack out (the tire did grow some going back to 20psi.)

With the tire on the ground I just drape the chains over the tire, hook the inside to pre marked links and then work the outside hook/adjuster to a pre marked link.

When removing the wheel, I used piece of thin wood about the same space as the chains will need when reinstalling the tire and drop the wheel onto it. Reinstalling the wheel on this spacer will line up lug holes much easier since the cross links will lift the tire up to the hub and it's easier to catch the first lug bolt.

I also tag my chains left and right when I take them off in the spring, the side chains work out to different lengths on each side. Tires ain't quite equal circumference by 2 links.

NOW... Does anyone else think JD could have given us mortals just a bit more hub to hang the wheel on? How much metal did they $ave flush fitting the hub in$ide the wheel....?:nunu:
Like your idea but sure seems like a lot more work .:dunno: .. With tractor (for me one side at a time) already lifted in the air lay chain over the wheel, have tractor in N spin the tire enough to reach behind the wheel to hook the back, then the front, done. :dunno:
 

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I also tag my chains left and right when I take them off in the spring, the side chains work out to different lengths on each side. Tires ain't quite equal circumference by 2 links.
Ditto. I tag my chains as well.

NOW... Does anyone else think JD could have given us mortals just a bit more hub to hang the wheel on? How much metal did they $ave flush fitting the hub in$ide the wheel....?:nunu:
My wish would be for lug NUTS instead of those darn lug bolts.

Oh, and while we're at it... about a bit more clearance under the fenders. These are tractors not low riders. :)
 
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