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Current tank is a 34 gal, steel/bladder tank, ~18 years old and needs to be replaced.
Fiberglass or Steel again?
 

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I don't see a benefit one way or the other. Don't they both have a rubber bladder anyway? My house is 6 yrs old and plumber installed two smaller pressure tanks instead of one large. I forget what his reasoning was but thought I'd mention it.

Mine is steel btw.
 

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The well guy installed fiberglass when my well was drilled 7 years ago. Still going strong. It's a Flexlite FL12 35 gallon tank. Other than it works exactly like it is supposed to and it's what the well driller installs as their standard brand of tank I cant say much more about it.

Another similar model would be a Wellmate WM12. That one is around 40 gallons.

Both look to be at least $100 more than the same sized standard steel X-trol tanks.

They both have a rubber diaphragm. The fiberglass tank makers will tell you theirs are better designed and last longer.

In some areas where the ground water has a low pH having a well tank that has no metal is a big positive.
 

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Current tank is a 34 gal, steel/bladder tank, ~18 years old and needs to be replaced.
Fiberglass or Steel again?
Here in Canada you can't find a galvanized tank anymore. The sales person told me it would cost 4 times as much as plastic. Kent
 

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I'd say if you're in an area with high salt in the air (ocean/ etc.) I'd likely go with fiberglass, but if not, I don't think it matters. We're on the original one (close to 20 years old now), steel.
 

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Just my quick opinion....

Are you having a plumber do this instal? If so I would just go with what he recommends or what he usually uses.

Just like buying equipment and vehicles - service after the sale is paramount. If he gets a tank from a supplier other than his usual he might have less success with any warranty issues.
 

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I replaced mine about fifteen years ago with a steel one, the bigger the better.
The larger the accumulator tank is the longer the pump has to run to charge it. Also it will hover at lower pressures longer before the pump kicks back on.

The smaller the tank is the quicker it fills and you don't stay at the low end pressure as long but the pump cycles on and off more frequently.

Tanks should be sized based on anticipated flow demand.

Typically for a residential home with up to 5 bedrooms a tank from 35 to 50 gallons is a very good fit for pressure performance of the plumbing system and keeping the cycling of the pump to a minimum.
 

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Current tank is a 34 gal, steel/bladder tank, ~18 years old and needs to be replaced.
Fiberglass or Steel again?
Probably doesn’t matter unless your water conditions don’t like metal. Did the bladder fail in yours? I replaced my 60 gal tank after 20 years, but it still worked fine, which was surprising since how I use mine is hard on the bladder. When I water the cows twice a day, I open the 1” yard hydrant. It flows more than the 15 gpm pump can supply, so the line pressure drops way below the bladder pre charge pressure...they tell me that stresses the bladder.

This is what I always have used. You will likely have to go to a supply house to get them.

The reason I replaced mine, is that I put in a variable speed system, and I just couldn’t get the speed control loop tuned out in the variable speed pump drive with the 60 gallon tank (It might have be an 80, I can’t remember).The larger size dampened the pressure changes out too much, and the drive was always a step behind the actual pressure.
I talked to an engineer at Pentair, and he schooled me up on sizing the tank, I put in a 20 gallon one, and was able to tune the drive to work great.
If you have a constant speed 40/60 psi setup, then bigger is better.
 

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The larger the accumulator tank is the longer the pump has to run to charge it. Also it will hover at lower pressures longer before the pump kicks back on.

The smaller the tank is the quicker it fills and you don't stay at the low end pressure as long but the pump cycles on and off more frequently.

Tanks should be sized based on anticipated flow demand.

Typically for a residential home with up to 5 bedrooms a tank from 35 to 50 gallons is a very good fit for pressure performance of the plumbing system and keeping the cycling of the pump to a minimum.
Pump flow rate is the major parameter in sizing the tank. You should size it where you get at least 2 min of runtime after cut-in...for sure you want to be greater than 1 minute runtime
 

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Are you having a plumber do this instal? If so I would just go with what he recommends or what he usually uses.
I am, this will be a first for me. I've done it twice before but we now have other issues. I've isolated a small leak someplace between the tank and the well pump. It takes between 45 minutes to an hour for the tank to drain down with no one using water. About a month ago we paid to have a new pump (like the tank, I've done it twice myself) installed which I thought was the problem with it leaking down, (bad check valve at the pump), I was wrong. Replacing the pump was a no brainier as it was really old like the fresh water tank.
The guy that put the pump in is going to pressurize the system to find the leak, how he does that, I have no clue. I do know all connection to the tank have to be taken apart, hence new tank.
I hope it's not the pitless adapter.


This is what I always have used. You will likely have to go to a supply house to get them.
We have that exact brand now and as of now we will be replacing it with the same brand. That is an excellent brand tank IMO.



Pump flow rate is the major parameter in sizing the tank. You should size it where you get at least 2 min of runtime after cut-in...for sure you want to be greater than 1 minute runtime
Exactly right. High pump gal/min. does not make for a better system.
 

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Probably doesn’t matter unless your water conditions don’t like metal. Did the bladder fail in yours? I replaced my 60 gal tank after 20 years, but it still worked fine, which was surprising since how I use mine is hard on the bladder. When I water the cows twice a day, I open the 1” yard hydrant. It flows more than the 15 gpm pump can supply, so the line pressure drops way below the bladder pre charge pressure...they tell me that stresses the bladder.

This is what I always have used. You will likely have to go to a supply house to get them.

The reason I replaced mine, is that I put in a variable speed system, and I just couldn’t get the speed control loop tuned out in the variable speed pump drive with the 60 gallon tank (It might have be an 80, I can’t remember).The larger size dampened the pressure changes out too much, and the drive was always a step behind the actual pressure.
I talked to an engineer at Pentair, and he schooled me up on sizing the tank, I put in a 20 gallon one, and was able to tune the drive to work great.
If you have a constant speed 40/60 psi setup, then bigger is better.
I put in a variable speed constant pressure drive as well, and I've gotta say, I love it. My tank now is 4 gallons, and mounted to the wall. My pump no longer cycles when I do extended watering in my little fields.
 

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It takes between 45 minutes to an hour for the tank to drain down with no one using water. About a month ago we paid to have a new pump (like the tank, I've done it twice myself) installed which I thought was the problem with it leaking down, (bad check valve at the pump), I was wrong. Replacing the pump was a no brainier as it was really old like the fresh water tank.
I had the same thing going on. Pump would kick on every 20-30 minutes without using and water. Luckily I have a jet pump in the basement so I can hear it when it runs.

I spent over a month trying to find a leak. Finally I decided to change out the check valve before the pump and that was it.

———————

When every one is talking about the size of these pump tanks. There is an important criteria you need to pay attention to. The capacity in gallons of the tank is not the same as the draw down capacity.

For example a very common size household size well tank is a WX-202 - I used to sell this stuff. While the capacity of the tank is 20 gallons the draw down capacity is 6.2 gallons at 30#-50# pressure. That means that when you use up about 6 gallons the pump comes on to refill it.

Another way to look at it is there is a rubber bladder in the tank. The lower part of the tank holds water within the bladder and the top of the tank is filled with air to pressurize the water.

If you reference a 60 gallon tank it actually holds only 19 gallons.

780521
 

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I had the same thing going on. Pump would kick on every 20-30 minutes without using and water. Luckily I have a jet pump in the basement so I can hear it when it runs.

I spent over a month trying to find a leak. Finally I decided to change out the check valve before the pump and that was it.

———————

When every one is talking about the size of these pump tanks. There is an important criteria you need to pay attention to. The capacity in gallons of the tank is not the same as the draw down capacity.

For example a very common size household size well tank is a WX-202 - I used to sell this stuff. While the capacity of the tank is 20 gallons the draw down capacity is 6.2 gallons at 30#-50# pressure. That means that when you use up about 6 gallons the pump comes on to refill it.

Another way to look at it is there is a rubber bladder in the tank. The lower part of the tank holds water within the bladder and the top of the tank is filled with air to pressurize the water.

If you reference a 60 gallon tank it actually holds only 19 gallons.

View attachment 780521

Yes that is a good point to bring up. In your example, a 19 drawdown would be a good match for a 10-12 gpm pump. 15 gpm would be pushing it, but probably still kinda OK.
Also, you can see from the chart that the drawdown drops substantially when you go from a 30-50 to a 40-60 setup.
 

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Another way to look at it is there is a rubber bladder in the tank. The lower part of the tank holds water within the bladder and the top of the tank is filled with air to pressurize the water.
We are currently running a WX-205 30-50 psi.
I was told the fiberglass tanks have a so called balloon in the tank vs a bladder. The water cavity is all around the balloon, air is held in the center.
 

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We are currently running a WX-205 30-50 psi.
I was told the fiberglass tanks have a so called balloon in the tank vs a bladder. The water cavity is all around the balloon, air is held in the center.
That’s pretty neat.

It was 30-40 years ago when I was in the supply house business. The only thing we carried were Well-X-Trol tanks and Goulds pumps.
 

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I can’t get one to last more than a few years. i have replaced mine at least 3 times . I don’t think any of them made it to the ten year mark. Mine have all rusted out. theres Usually no warning, water just starts spraying out at the worst possible time. So I end getting whatever Menards or Fleet Farm has in stock.

I didn’t know that plastic was an option. Mine have all been painted steel. At least on the outside.
 

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My setup.

PXL_20210327_202351100.jpg


PXL_20210327_202400595.jpg
 
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