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Hello All!

Recently bought a used 2015 1025R with 36 hours on it. I love the tractor. It came with a bagger system, which is currently taking space up in the garage. If your in Michigan, and would be interested in it let me know! But the reason I am posting, I'm looking for everything I need to mount a front snow blade on the tractor. I know I know its rather early, but I'd rather be prepared, then trying to put it all together during hunting season. Does anyone have a parts list for the front snow blade. Sorry if this has already been discussed.

Thanks in advanced

Paul
 

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Thanks for the Welcomes. Look forward to getting to know everyone.

Driveshaft- I live north of Detroit an hour, I went to school in Big Rapids. :bigthumb:

Mark- Good Question. I want to mount it directly to the tractor. For my driveway, I think this is the best route to go.

Thanks,

Paul
 

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See my post here that I did in January 2019. I listed the part numbers and some helpful info. I just checked and the prices are still the same today. I did the 60" blade but a 54" is also available from Deere. And welcome from Grass Lake :thumbup1gif:

2018 1025r and 60" JD front plow parts needed
 

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One hand man, welcome to the forum. You’ll find the experience of the forum members invaluable.

If your sure you want a tractor mounted snow plow I’m confident you’ll get the answers you need quickly.

I went with a plow that mounts in place of the bucket on the FEL and I’m very pleased with it. If you change your mind and are interested in an FEL mounted plow I’ll be happy to share my experience.
 

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Kylew, Nice write up. I do like the 60" blade. How does your 1 series push the snow?

Sportshot. i'm not opposed to listening on your experience of a FEL snow blade. :) I can change my mind rather easily, that is why i'm starting to look now. I really would like power angle, growing up I plowed with a manual angling blade on the back of a "orange" tractor. I think i'm just worried about the cracks in my concrete driveway.

Paul
 

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I have the Frontier AF10 5 foot loader mounted plow. I have had it two winters and use it on the gravel driveway of my lake home. It's taken me two winters to learn how to use it. It's a battle maintaining steering. Using it in float is out of the question so you are not going to scrape a concrete driveway clean. If the snow is heavy you can't really take a full cut with the blade angled or it will just push the front end to the side. I plow with the gauge shoes pretty high and leave some snow to pack down. It does have the advantage of being able to raise the loader and push back piles of snow. I'm not thrilled about it, but it does what I need it to do and is pretty cost effective.

I did just put Rimgaurd in all 4 tires and I think that will be helpful. I had rear ballast but nothing on the front.

Snow pushers are the thing now and that is likely what I would look at if I didn't have this. Might not be so great on the long driveway but I would give it a look.
 

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RS America, those are some of the reasons why I think i want to go to a front snow blade frame mounted. My worries about a box type pusher is the tractor not having enough wait to make a long push.
 

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I'm looking to buy a snow blade before this winter also. These lists are far from complete but the highlights of my research so far. There's 2 primary directions you can go. One is with the Deere Quick Hitch. This uses the same blades and snow blowers as the X700 series.


c25g20a2.gif

Deere 54 Quick Hitch Snow Blade Installation & Review (Tractor Time with Time on Youtube)

Pros-
  • Doesn't need a 3rd hydraulic circuit to angle the blade
  • Can easily switch between snow blower and snow blade (Note: If you have the drive over auto PTO connect for your mower deck you need to remove that adapter from the tractor before connecting the snow blower PTO)
Cons-
  • A bit more manual labor involved on the install.
  • Blade lift is limited if you need to push tall piles.


The other option is to replace the loader bucket with a plow blade. Deere and several 3rd parties offer this type blade.

af10f_series_front_blades_r4g029838_rrd_1366x768_large_1e918a37bc38869b49d0b960ecdcc5a0801a4ab8.jpg

Pros-
  • Minimal labor involved
  • Blade can go full height of FEL to push tall piles
Cons-
  • Needs 3rd hydraulic circuit to angle blade unless you want to do that manually. Deere and several 3rd party options available
  • Snow blower options limited to rear 3PH or going with the quick hitch snow blower above. (In which case, might as well go with the QH Blade)
 

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Kylew, Nice write up. I do like the 60" blade. How does your 1 series push the snow?

Sportshot. i'm not opposed to listening on your experience of a FEL snow blade. :) I can change my mind rather easily, that is why i'm starting to look now. I really would like power angle, growing up I plowed with a manual angling blade on the back of a "orange" tractor. I think i'm just worried about the cracks in my concrete driveway.

Paul
Hi Paul, there is some misinformation listed in some responses. You don’t need a third function hydraulic to angle the FEL mounted plows. The angle function is handled by using the curl dump function connections. You run hydraulic hoses to the angle cylinders using the dump-curl outputs of the tractor. This gives you left and right angle and full height up and down with your normal controls. What it doesn’t allow for is the ability to add downforce to the plow. This can be accomplished with adding a third function hydraulic like those Artillian sells. Downforce is very useful with packed snow.

Advantages of FEL plows are numerous in my opinion. The QH mounted plows hang very low off the front of the tractor. I plowed with an x728 for many years and the only time I ever got stuck was when trying to pile snow. Running up the pile can get the QH and plow hung up. With the FEL plow this won’t happen because you can raise the plow full height. The FEL allows you to push snow back from the top of the pile where the QH plow only allows pushing near the bottom of the pile. Quick change to the bucket if necessary is also easy with the FEL plow. They call the frame mounted Quick Hitch or Quick tach, whatever, it really isn’t. There is no way to attach the plow without man handling it into position. The FEL plow on the other hand can be installed by just hooking into the JDQA. Both system do require you to attach hydraulic hoses. The QH mounted plow is barely off the ground when you have it angled and try to raise it full height. The FEL plow you can raise as high as you want.

The disadvantage of FEL mounted plows is the inability to put downforce on the plow without a third function kit. There is also the possibility of the plow tipping forward due to leak down of the curl-dump cylinders. I never had this problem before I added the third function Artillian kit. Some members strapped their plows to prevent that from happening.

My experience with plowing in Wisconsin has found that sometimes you can use float and sometimes you can’t. If the snow is deep and wet you probably will not be able to float the plow because the resistance of the weight of the plow and wet snow is greater than the available traction. You may need to keep the plow up slightly to keep the weight on the front end and allow you to steer. Most FEL mounted plows are heavier than the JD 54”-60” plows. This will also make a difference in heavy wet snow. With either type plow the amount of ballast weight will depend on plow weight and whether the snow is deep and wet or just fluffy.

Depending on your driveway you may want to consider a rubber or plastic plow wear bar. They are easy on blacktop and cement surfaces where the steel ones can cause some damage.

The learning curve for me with the FEL plow was relatively short until I added the Artillian third function. I then spent considerable time trying to decide if there was any benefit to plowing with different curl positions. I finally decided to just ignore the ability to curl the plow unless I wanted to push the very top of a pile over. The one thing the curl function does do is allow you to remove stuck on snow from the plow by raising the plow and then push the curl function to REGEN which allowed the plow to tip forward faster and jarred much of the snow from the plow just like it does with dirt in the bucket.
 

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Hi Paul, there is some misinformation listed in some responses. You don’t need a third function hydraulic to angle the FEL mounted plows. The angle function is handled by using the curl dump function connections. You run hydraulic hoses to the angle cylinders using the dump-curl outputs of the tractor. This gives you left and right angle and full height up and down with your normal controls. What it doesn’t allow for is the ability to add downforce to the plow. This can be accomplished with adding a third function hydraulic like those Artillian sells. Downforce is very useful with packed snow.

Advantages of FEL plows are numerous in my opinion. The QH mounted plows hang very low off the front of the tractor. I plowed with an x728 for many years and the only time I ever got stuck was when trying to pile snow. Running up the pile can get the QH and plow hung up. With the FEL plow this won’t happen because you can raise the plow full height. The FEL allows you to push snow back from the top of the pile where the QH plow only allows pushing near the bottom of the pile. Quick change to the bucket if necessary is also easy with the FEL plow. They call the frame mounted Quick Hitch or Quick tach, whatever, it really isn’t. There is no way to attach the plow without man handling it into position. The FEL plow on the other hand can be installed by just hooking into the JDQA. Both system do require you to attach hydraulic hoses. The QH mounted plow is barely off the ground when you have it angled and try to raise it full height. The FEL plow you can raise as high as you want.

The disadvantage of FEL mounted plows is the inability to put downforce on the plow without a third function kit. There is also the possibility of the plow tipping forward due to leak down of the curl-dump cylinders. I never had this problem before I added the third function Artillian kit. Some members strapped their plows to prevent that from happening.

My experience with plowing in Wisconsin has found that sometimes you can use float and sometimes you can’t. If the snow is deep and wet you probably will not be able to float the plow because the resistance of the weight of the plow and wet snow is greater than the available traction. You may need to keep the plow up slightly to keep the weight on the front end and allow you to steer. Most FEL mounted plows are heavier than the JD 54”-60” plows. This will also make a difference in heavy wet snow. With either type plow the amount of ballast weight will depend on plow weight and whether the snow is deep and wet or just fluffy.

Depending on your driveway you may want to consider a rubber or plastic plow wear bar. They are easy on blacktop and cement surfaces where the steel ones can cause some damage.

The learning curve for me with the FEL plow was relatively short until I added the Artillian third function. I then spent considerable time trying to decide if there was any benefit to plowing with different curl positions. I finally decided to just ignore the ability to curl the plow unless I wanted to push the very top of a pile over. The one thing the curl function does do is allow you to remove stuck on snow from the plow by raising the plow and then push the curl function to REGEN which allowed the plow to tip forward faster and jarred much of the snow from the plow just like it does with dirt in the bucket.
I have to disagree...so we don't add to any "misinformation" here...

If you don't have the 3rd function, then you loose the ability to adjust the vertical tilt angle of the plow, AKA angle of attack or "curl". You can still raise and lower the plow so you can indeed apply "down pressure" or "force" as you wrote) to it or "float" it, albeit with sacrificing staring ability.

Everything else, I will agree with :good2:
 

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Kylew, Nice write up. I do like the 60" blade. How does your 1 series push the snow?
For what I do, the blade works fine. My first year I lost traction on my neighbors drive plowing a part that was off camber but other than that, I typically don't lose traction. I put on the 72 lb starter wheel weights on and that made a big difference on that part of his driveway. Also, one time last year we got about 8-10 inches that was wet, slushy type snow and that was a joy to plow (insert favorite fecicous word here). I wasn't losing traction as much as I was losing steering, using float or not (most of the time I can use float). Usually I don't have rear ballast on but that time I tried putting on my ballast box for extra rear weight but it didn't help much. Steering was just tough in that snow.

I put a piece of 2" steel pipe over the cutting edge so I can plow my yard. I plow over 200' in my yard to make a turn around and a driveway to my barn. Also plow my gravel drive of about 100", our gravel private road of over 1/4 mile, and occasionally 2 or 3 neighbors gravel driveways. My situation doesn't typically call for me to have to pile the snow, as I can just push it further back off the road, and for the most part, off the edges of the driveways.

If there was a need to pile or remove/relocate a mass of snow, it's really no big deal to remove the blade & quick hitch and put the loader on. 10 minutes tops, including installing the Edge Tamers on the bucket. If you didn't know, Edge Tamers are accessories you can install on the buckets cutting edge that keeps the edge off the ground so you can skim over the surface and scoop up material without digging into the ground/surface. They work great in all seasons.

No disrespect, but I disagree that the blade has to be man-handled to be mounted. I keep my blade and quick hitch on a pallet, so when the time comes I fork it out to the floor of the barn. Once I install the QH & adaptor bracket, I slide the blade to the edge of the pallet and drive the tractor to it and pick it up (I keep the blade standing up on edge). Yes, it's a little bit of manual labor but it's not back-breaking.

I DO agree that the lift height of the QH is low. Lifted fully and angled, the tip of the blade only clears the barn floor by a couple inches. The barn floor is flat and level, whereas out plowing the terrain varies, and that couple inches typically becomes a couple/few inches to non-existent. I work around that 'fault' by straightening the blade before/during/after I raise it while plowing.

No piece of machinery is perfect, including the Quick Hitch or the Loader mounted blade setup. You'll have to decide what might work best for your situation.

It would be nice if SulleyBear would throw his 2 cents into this conversation. He's one of the resident experts on snow plowing with the 1025.

Hope this helps some.
 

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It would be nice if SulleyBear would throw his 2 cents into this conversation. He's one of the resident experts on snow plowing with the 1025.
Wow, my reputation precedes me........But plowing for over 30 years and the last several years, nearly 1,000 driveways a year with the tractor does add a lot of practical experience. Thanks Kyle, I appreciate the respect for my viewpoint, the confidence in my opinions and of course, our GTT friendship........:good2: By the way, I don't know how I ever got along without my 3ph position control lever stop plate. It took the OEM control and made it as it should have been and now will always be. Correct and functioning outstanding, no lever side flex or pushing the stop bolt out of the way......Thanks again and I really appreciate your prompt fabricating it and sending it to me.

Number one thing I would begin with on plowing snow is 95% of the success or failure with any piece of equipment is the operator. Like anything, practical experience and a vast number of different challenges and experiences help you really understand how to use any piece of equipment. Knowing it's strengths, understanding it weaknesses and most importantly, learning how to get 110% out of the equipment.

This begins with acknowledging that all snow falls are not the same. You have to adapt to the conditions and your equipment selections must provide you and your machine the greatest tools for the project. Snow which makes it easy to make snowballs and to create great snow people (gender neutral snow men and women in this PC culture) makes for tougher plowing. The colder it is, the better the snow plowing, the better the traction, the better the results. The closer it is to freezing or above, the worse the traction, the tougher it is to plow, pile, push and even blow snow. It's imperative to learn how to best adapt to these changes. You adapt in the amount of snow you push, where you push it, the ballast you use and how you drive the tractor and operate the plow.

Personally, I have no use for a snow pusher on a SCUT or CUT, unless you were exclusively plowing parking lots or commercial sidewalks straight back and forth with no snow piling location options. All the snow goes one place, all season. If you are planning on it for your driveway, it's going to be slower, provide less options and dramatically limit how you plow snow. Personally, I wouldn't own a snow pusher. It offers no benefits you can't get in a plow, and it limits your use of the implement to straight forward pushing. It's not really even designed to back drag, unless you get that specific option on some brands.

Hydraulic blade angling is critical. While you can plow without it, effectively you are reducing your plows capabilities to that of a snow pusher. Manual angling is not only slower, it requires you to get on and off the tractor much more often, or to dramatically compromise your plowing efforts. More importantly, it alters how you plow snow, which slows you down. Last but not least it means climbing on and off the tractor more often, which every single time is an opportunity to get hurt, possibly seriously in a slip and fall. Actually, if you are going to have a plow blade and not have hydraulically angled blade, you might as well have snow pusher and really limit your plowing options, at least that way, you won't be inclined to get off the machine so you are less likely to get hurt.

Whether the plow blade is Quick Hitch mounted to the front of the tractor or to the FEL arms really is a matter of personal preference. I have plowed a lot of snow very successfully with the Quick Hitch. For my machine the way its set up, the extra length of the machine using the FEL arms on which to mount a plow means it won't fit in the garage stall without rearranging the garage and changing parking stalls, moving freezers, etc. So for that reason, I don't use a FEL mounted plow.

Also, since I don't park a SUV in that garage bay, I have installed an entire wall of floor to ceiling oak cabinets with a work counter. So now this bay is really too narrow to fit a full sized SUV (Ford Expedition, Mercedes Benz GLS) If I didn't have the constraints of the parking arrangement, I would likely try the FEL mounted plow arrangement and see if there are any specific advantages or disadvantages for my equipment and plowing projects. I would measure the time efficiency and see if it helped or hurt my plow time. Time is money and the more efficiently I can plow snow while doing an excellent job, the more interested I am in leaning about the system.

In order to give the OP the most helpful information, I would need to know if he has ever plowed snow with a tractor. Wow, I have put as many hours on my tractor in one weekend as he has in total on his machine. That is a like new machine with such low hours....

Make sure to read the Air Cleaner Threads about the air cleaner on your machine before you get too far. I would strongly encourage you to upgrade to the new Air Cleaner setup at a cost of $150 to prevent any issues from occurring down the road with engine damage. Please make sure to read the stickies and then we will answer whatever questions or concerns you might have. This is a very important issue.


It would be very handy to see several pictures of his driveway to get a feel for its layout and the particular challenges he is facing. He is an hour north of Detroit so he likely gets similar snowfall to the central, lower Peninsula areas like JDMich and other GTT friends......

Kyle, just like your location and my location are nearly perfectly due east and west of one another, with probably 80 miles between us, the snow accumulation totals are quite different as are the issues with lake effect snow, wind, etc. The real devil is in the details......

I would also like to know the OP's general age. If he is near retirement, like I am, that's one thing, if he is a youngster, like you are, that's another. Is he dealing with any physical or health issues? That makes a difference.

Looks like he has concrete drive, Does he have any Gravel drive or asphalt areas or private roads, etc as that, also make a huge difference in how to plow and what to plow with.

Is he planning on plowing for others, or just his own drives, etc.?

The more the OP can tell and show us about his plowing site, himself and his other relevant information which I need to be aware of, the more helpful information we can provide to him............

So, not only do I welcome him to GTT, I encourage him to share the details and his answers to the questions which I have highlighted........Looking forward to helping him make the best decisions for his needs.......

(I went back and re-read the entire thread to try and pick up some of the answers to questions which I had, so if the post seems chopped up, its because I deleted the questions I was posing once I learned of the answers...)
 

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I have to disagree...so we don't add to any "misinformation" here...

If you don't have the 3rd function, then you loose the ability to adjust the vertical tilt angle of the plow, AKA angle of attack or "curl". You can still raise and lower the plow so you can indeed apply "down pressure" or "force" as you wrote) to it or "float" it, albeit with sacrificing staring ability.

Everything else, I will agree with :good2:
Hi Kenny,

My experience with my plow was that it never seemed to allow me to get down pressure no matter what I tried I have the 66” CTA plow and I tried numerous times to lift the front tires and couldn’t do it. My inexperience with the new set up could be a factor and I was just not doing it right. Possible, but I found using the curl-dump function lifted the front end the most when I had the bucket on.

The angle of attack after installation of the Artillian kit added another learning curve. We had a lot of snow late in the winter and changing the attack angle created other issues. If the plow was angled the blade didn’t lay flat for the whole 66” width. For me I found it best to set the attack angle with the bucket level rod and never change it unless I wanted to push a very tall pile a little farther over the back of the pile. When I tried changing the attack angle to scrape hard packed snow it didn’t seem to do any better. Possibly if I had the metal scraper blade instead of the plastic one it may have improved hard pack scraping.

I readily admit that someone else may operate my equipment better than I do but in the end I was very pleased with how the 1025r and 66” CTA plow handled the fourth snowiest winter since records have been kept in MN-WI.
 

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Sportshot, what you are describing sounds like issues with the geometry of the CTA blade specifically, other FEL blades may not have those problems.
 

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I understand what Sportshot's talking about with regards to the geometry. I have the same behavior (I avoided the use of the word "issue" as I don't consider it an issue) with my FEL mounted blade.

Depending on how the FEL is "curled" (either forward or back) is going to change the axis angle of the pivot point for the blade. Not an "issue", it's just geometry. (Damn that guy, Pythagoras! :laugh:) If I adjust the curl so that the pivot-pin is pretty much straight-vertical, than I can adjust the blade angle and the cutting edge will stay parallel to the driveway. But if the curl has the pivot-pin leaning forward or backwards, then when the blade swings one way or the other, one edge will hit the driveway and the other edge will be high in the air.

I need to move my blade in the next day or two to mow around where I have it stored. Should I do a video on this to illustrate it?

I don't think that this is blade brand specific.
 

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I understand what Sportshot's talking about with regards to the geometry. I have the same behavior (I avoided the use of the word "issue" as I don't consider it an issue) with my FEL mounted blade.

Depending on how the FEL is "curled" (either forward or back) is going to change the axis angle of the pivot point for the blade. Not an "issue", it's just geometry. (Damn that guy, Pythagoras! :laugh:) If I adjust the curl so that the pivot-pin is pretty much straight-vertical, than I can adjust the blade angle and the cutting edge will stay parallel to the driveway. But if the curl has the pivot-pin leaning forward or backwards, then when the blade swings one way or the other, one edge will hit the driveway and the other edge will be high in the air.

I need to move my blade in the next day or two to mow around where I have it stored. Should I do a video on this to illustrate it?

I don't think that this is blade brand specific.
I’d like to see a video. Maybe I’ll learn something new. Sounds like you experienced the same thing I found. I finally just came to the conclusion that just because you can change the angle doesn’t mean I should.
 
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