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Discussion Starter #1
Just added a new 54” front mounted snowblower and was going to install chains on the front wheels to get better traction . Called the dealer and they do not recommend front wheel chains for 2 reasons . They say that it is very hard on the drive gears and that they will rub on the knuckle of the wheel housing. Looking for advise from anyone running front wheel chains . Thanks !
 

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I can't give you a personal suggestion as I've never ran front chains on any tractor I've had or used, but I did find some other threads where it was discussed and it seems to be a few good arguments against them, and a few good reasons to use them. Personally, I've never felt a need for any chains on the 1025R, and when I did use rear chains on a lighter tractor (X730) I tore up some of my asphalt driveway (again, not suggested to use them on asphalt but many have done it with no issues) and gained absolutely no traction on ice.

https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/75585-1026r-front-tire-chains.html

https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/2764-chains-front-tires-1026r.html

https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/11419-any-one-running-front-chains.html
 

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I can't give you a personal suggestion as I've never ran front chains on any tractor I've had or used, but I did find some other threads where it was discussed and it seems to be a few good arguments against them, and a few good reasons to use them. Personally, I've never felt a need for any chains on the 1025R, and when I did use rear chains on a lighter tractor (X730) I tore up some of my asphalt driveway (again, not suggested to use them on asphalt but many have done it with no issues) and gained absolutely no traction on ice.

https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/75585-1026r-front-tire-chains.html

https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/2764-chains-front-tires-1026r.html

https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/11419-any-one-running-front-chains.html
Hi,
I have a set that I run on my 1025R, same machine basically. You have to limit the front turning on the left side, due to the hydraulic fitting on the steering cylinder. I also cusomized a set of chains that I had from an old tractor that were basically new. I ran them several years. Not running any as yet this year, testing my groved tires. The chains I made are very tight. I did not have issues with the nuckles or the hydraulic fitting. Rarely used 4x4, only when I stuck it. I only used it for increased steering traction, 95% of the time. I have pics on here someplace with regard to exhaust diversion which shows the chains on. I'll see if I can locate them.
Bill

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks

I can't give you a personal suggestion as I've never ran front chains on any tractor I've had or used, but I did find some other threads where it was discussed and it seems to be a few good arguments against them, and a few good reasons to use them. Personally, I've never felt a need for any chains on the 1025R, and when I did use rear chains on a lighter tractor (X730) I tore up some of my asphalt driveway (again, not suggested to use them on asphalt but many have done it with no issues) and gained absolutely no traction on ice.

https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/75585-1026r-front-tire-chains.html

https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/2764-chains-front-tires-1026r.html

https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/11419-any-one-running-front-chains.html
Thanks for the links to other threads , gives me lots of options to think about . As a first step I’ll add ballast to the back and forget about the chains until I see if I really need them . First storm was about 8” of wet snow and icy underneath and with no ballast slid around a fair bit . Again thx for taking the time to dig up the attached links
 

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Long straight runs and some gentle turns are probably harmless. But turning has numerous expensive risks as outlined in all those other threads. So the real question is this:
A) Do you actually have a demonstrated need for the front chains yet? If not, wait and see if you actually need it first.
B) Do you trust yourself to not blow the front driveline up while making sharp turns forgetting about it? (I do not trust me)
 

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Thanks for the links to other threads , gives me lots of options to think about . As a first step I’ll add ballast to the back and forget about the chains until I see if I really need them . First storm was about 8” of wet snow and icy underneath and with no ballast slid around a fair bit . Again thx for taking the time to dig up the attached links
I am in upstate also inside the snowbelt had 155"+ last year. My driveway is straight up a hill and usually I plow or rear snow blow in just 2wd. I have never even been close to needing chains for anything at most I go to AWD on occasion. You are correct about everything being balanced well with you ballast I am running a front plow and rear 3 point blower on the rear that gives plenty of weight for great tractive effort.

I did have a Kubota b6200 when I first moved here that just had a rear blower and I had to have chains on it to even make it back up the hill, that was solely due to all the weight on the rear with nothing on the front.

just my 2 cents, good luck.
 

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1026/54 plow w/wings and rubber cutting edge.

Driveway hill, no chains-no plow performance! I got by with the loader last week since I was caught minus my trousers by the snow and still doing leaves...

I chain up both my GX335 rear wheel GT/snowblower and my 1026 4WD w/plow because I've stuck them both once. Get a little too deep into the side of the pavement and the snow can easily cause a spin out trying to back up.

DON'T FORGET your DIFFERENTIAL LOCK PEDAL!!!
With a fully angled blade of snow going uphill mine will track mostly straight all the way up the hill until 2-3 passes when I have to reduce the cut taken. Handy thing that DIFLOCK!
 

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I do a lot of plowing and have not seen the need for rear chains, let alone front chains. The proper a ballast makes a ton of difference on the tractor. I would work towards the correct rear ballast before even thinking about adding chains on the rear, let alone the front.

Several of the driveways I plow are very steep grades and several of them require me to push all the snow up the driveways and to designated areas, which is the toughest requirement of the plow. Here is a picture of one driveway I plow so you can get a feel for the grade, etc. As I mentioned, I do not use front or rear tire chains on my 1025R. Note in the photo my tractor is sitting near the front of the house, to give you a feeling for the scale, etc.

Also, I plow with a rubber squeegee on my plow which really cleans the driveway surface, which adds to the overall traction on the surface.

Please keep in mind that some situations are not going to be ideal for traction, but they are usually the exception and not the rule. Nothing improves traction on glare ice other than steel tire chains. But the same chains will tear up the sealant level on asphalt and score both the black top and even the concrete and leave the driveway surface compromised. Concrete always has better traction than blacktop. Blacktop which has recently been sealed with have the slickest surface. Add glare ice on recently sealed black top and you will have poor traction under most equipment.



Also, make sure your front traction issues are not from too much front down pressure on the snow blower when on your tractor. Not only will too much front down pressure with the snow blower cause steering issues, it will also cause traction issues. Personally, I would suggest finding the rear ballast and watching the front down pressure and I am confident you will find you don't need the front chains.

I live in an area where we get a lot of lake effect snow and I plowed 45 times last season. When I plow, it takes me anywhere from 2.5 to 4 hours each plow outing as I am plowing about 2 dozen residential driveways and at times, up to 1.5 miles of private roads which are 33' wide.

The snow blower should be easier to regulate the down pressure than is the plow because you aren't raising and lowering the snow blower nearly as much as you would the plow.

If you are new to plowing / snow blowing with this equipment, I would give yourself some time to get accustomed with this equipment and make sure that you are comfortable and getting the most out of your machine before making changes or adding traction aids.

Also, if for some reason you find there is a need for something on the front axle, consider "Terra Grips" as an alternative as they are less likely to cause damage to either the tractor, the driveway and dmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm (evidence that turkey does make you sleepy, I just dozed off while typing my response and the result is the dmmmmmmm you see.....)

Superior-Tech | Rubber Tire Chains

I used Terra Grips extensively on my 2 wd 455 tractor and was very pleased with the results. I prefer these to tire chains as the cross links don't fail, the drive doesn't get scored up and they don't have the noise and vibration which can accompany some tire chains. Make sure to use the cross tensioners to keep them really
tight. I found these to be very beneficial. I run two tensioners per rear wheel and crossed them in the center. No problems, no issues.


Amazon.com: Security Chain Company QG20032 Quik Grip Medium Tire Traction Chain Rubber Tightener - Set of 2: Automotive
 

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I have run front chains on my 1026r without any issues. I run v-bar chains on the rear, twist link on the front. I do not have a paved driveway. My driveway typically has packed snow or a ice covering. Chains are pretty much a must have for me. The front chains go on and off pretty easy, so l only use them for heavy snowfalls. Haven’t put them the last couple of winters due to lack of snow. Rear chains go on when I take the mmm off the week before thanksgiving and stay on until Easter.
 

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I bought my 1025 with rear chains and after the first year never used them again. In 4wd with a heavy ballast box and R4 tires, I've yet to need any chains to snow blow.
 

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I don't own a 1026r but I've been using front and rear chains for over 30 years. Rear chains on year round, front chains (most years) for winter snow plowing.
I do find, using rear chains a lot of times 4WD is not needed.
 

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I have found the need to use rear tire chains on my 1025R once. That is when we got the 25" of snow about three years ago. For normal snows, I never put them on.

My driveway is paved and steep. If you are on the level, I see no reason a 1 series would need tire chains and especially on the front.

Personally, I would try everything else before putting tire chains on the front wheels on a 1 series. I found the rear tire chains make a huge difference, when needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Made a Decision

To start thx for all the input on chains and the need for them . I decided on a $150 tractor supply 3 point carrier and a sheet of 3/4" plywood . I'll put a couple of pails of sand in it and also works great to bring the winters wood to the garage . Hopefully this does the trick . Let it snow !!!!
 

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Just make sure your pails are secured and you always check when backing up and yep, weight in any form will work.
 
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